Arachnids of North Carolina
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View Trachelidae Members: NC Records

Trachelas tranquillus - Broad-faced sac spider


Taxonomy
Order: ARANEAEInfraorder: AraneomorphaeFamily: Trachelidae                                                                                 
Comments: Originally described as Clubiona tranquilla by Hentz in 1847, it was officially placed in the Clubionidae in 1867, where it remained until it officially became a corinnid in 1967. When the genus was revised in 1974, it reverted to being a clubionid until it was moved again to the Corinnidae in 1995. Most recently, the corinnid subfamily, Trachelinae, was raised to family rank in 2014, though further work suggests that the genus may belong in the Gnaphosoidea. Watch this space!
Identification
Online Description/Photos: The tan/grey abdomen and dark red cephalothorax of this spider lend an appearance similar to that of Dysdera crocata (q.v.), but the latter have notably large, forward-projecting chelicerae. Furthermore Trachelas is often found in a silken retreat on foliage, while Dysdera is usually found in duff, where it feeds on isopods. BugGuide, Google Images, WikipediaTechnical Description: (1) Dondale, C. D. & Redner, J. H. (1982). The insects and arachnids of Canada, Part 9. The sac spiders of Canada and Alaska, Araneae: Clubionidae and Anyphaenidae. Research Branch Agriculture Canada Publication 1724: 1-194.1 1 111
Distribution in North Carolina
Comments:
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Adult phenology:
 High Mountains (HM) ‚Č• 4,000 ft.
 Low Mountains (LM) < 4,000 ft.
 Piedmont (Pd)
 Coastal Plain (CP)

Click on graph to enlarge
Habitats and Life History
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Behavior: "Spiders of the genus Trachelas characteristically have shiny red carapaces
and sterna that contrast strikingly with their pale abdomens. They spend
considerable time in silk retreats spun in rolled leaves, under loose bark, or on
objects on the ground, and are sometimes collected by sweeping or beating'
Maturity is apparently attained in autumn, when individuals may be seen in
houses, and the eggs are laid in white sacs during the same season. Some have been
known to bite when handled; the venom causes local swellings and lesions with
severe pain."(1)
Status in North Carolina
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Photo Gallery for Trachelas tranquillus - Broad-faced sac spider

Recorded by: Donald ZEPP
Johnston Co.
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Recorded by: Donald ZEPP
Johnston Co.
Comment: This young lady was walking on the edge of the dishpan with which I was working in my kitchen.
Recorded by: Donald ZEPP
Johnston Co.
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Recorded by: Donald B. ZEPP
Johnston Co.
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Recorded by: Donald B. ZEPP
Johnston Co.
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Recorded by: Donald B. ZEPP
Johnston Co.
Comment: Male and female captured together
Recorded by: Donald Zepp
Johnston Co.
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Recorded by: Vin Stanton
Buncombe Co.
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Recorded by: Barbara McRae
Macon Co.
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Recorded by: Steve Hall
Orange Co.
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Recorded by: Steve Hall
Orange Co.
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Recorded by: Steve Hall
Orange Co.
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