Hoppers of North Carolina:
Spittlebugs, Leafhoppers, Treehoppers, and Planthoppers
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MEMBRACIDAE Members: NC Records

Hebetica sylviae - No Common Name



© Scott Bolick- note shape and color

© Scott Bolick

© Scott Bolick

© Scott Bolick- nymph, note legs
Taxonomy
Family: MEMBRACIDAESubfamily: DarninaeTribe: Darnini
Taxonomic Author: McKamey & Sullivan-Beckers, 2019
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide, GBIF                                                                                  
Description: A brownish-green species, with the pronotum a unicolorous green or pale brown color with a darker apex and black pronotal pits. The legs are pale brown except that the femora are dorsally black for most of their length. Short, numerous setae cover the pronotum. Adult males are 7.5-8.2 mm long and 4.5 mm wide, females are 8.9-10.0 mm long and 5.0 mm wide. (McKamey & Sullivan-Beckers, 2019)

For more images of this species, see: BG.

Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Distribution: Southeastern United States (BG)
Abundance: Rare, recorded from a single county so far in the Piedmont.
Seasonal Occurrence
Jan
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Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Woodland
Plant Associates: Unclear, perhaps oaks (Quercus spp.); in NC, has been found on white mulberry.
Behavior:
Comment: This species was only officially described in 2019 from Kentucky, and has since been documented across the Southeast. It is the easternmost species of Darnini in the United States and the only member of Hebetica in the country, with the other described Hebetica species in South America and the other Darnini taxa belonging to Stictopelta. This new species could be exotic and have been introduced in the United States, since it went undiscovered for so long until recently (and there appears to be an increase over time in the detection of this species in the Southeast) (McKamey & Sullivan-Beckers, 2019).

The wasp Hoplosoides costalis is a frequent predator of this species, with it burying specimens in its subterranean burrows for its larvae (McKamey & Sullivan-Beckers, 2019).

Status: Native
Global and State Rank:

Species Photo Gallery for Hebetica sylviae No Common Name

Photo by: Scott Bolick
Forsyth Co.
Comment: unid_treehopper
Photo by: Scott Bolick
Forsyth Co.
Comment: unid_treehopper
Photo by: Scott Bolick
Forsyth Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Scott Bolick
Forsyth Co.
Comment: unid_treehopper - unid_treehopper
Photo by: Scott Bolick
Forsyth Co.
Comment: unid_treehopper - unid_treehopper
Photo by: Scott Bolick
Forsyth Co.
Comment: unid_treehopper - unid_treehopper
Photo by: Scott Bolick
Forsyth Co.
Comment: unid_treehopper - unid_treehopper
Photo by: Scott Bolick
Forsyth Co.
Comment: State record
Photo by: Scott Bolick
Forsyth Co.
Comment: State record
Photo by: Scott Bolick
Forsyth Co.
Comment: State record
Photo by: Scott Bolick
Forsyth Co.
Comment: State record