Moths of North Carolina
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View PDFGeometridae Members: 91 NC Records

Chlorochlamys chloroleucaria (Guenée, [1858]) - Blackberry Looper


Taxonomy
Superfamily: Geometroidea Family: GeometridaeSubfamily: GeometrinaeTribe: HemitheiniP3 Number: 910654.00 MONA Number: 7071.00
Comments: One of four species in this genus recorded in North America and the only one found in North Carolina.
Identification
Field Guide Descriptions: Covell (1984); Beadle and Leckie (2012)Online Photographs: MPG, BugGuide, iNaturalist, Google, BAMONATechnical Description, Adults: Forbes (1948); Ferguson (1969, 1985)Technical Description, Immature Stages: Forbes (1948); Ferguson (1969, 1985); Wagner et al. (2001); Wagner (2005)                                                                                 
Adult Markings: A small gray-green or yellowish-green Emerald with white striae and fairly broad, cream-colored antemedian and postmedian lines. The postmedian on the forewing is fairly straight and even. The antemedian is convex on the forewing and missing on the hindwing. The fringes and costa are yellowish and the front is either yellowish or rusty-orange (Ferguson, 1985).
Forewing Length: 8-11 mm, males; 9-11.5 mm, females (Ferguson, 1985)
Adult Structural Features: Antennae of the males are broadly pectinate at the base, gradually tapering towards the apex. Only a single pair of spurs is present on the hind tibiae of the male, distinguishing them from Nemoria, Dichorda, and Synchlora, all of which have two pairs, as do females of Chlorochlamys. Male genitalia have characteristic large socii and uncus (see Ferguson, 1985, for details and illustrations).
Adult ID Requirements: Identifiable from good quality photos of unworn specimens.
Immatures and Development: Larvae are smoothly cylindrical, lacking the dorsolateral projections and spines found in Nemoria, Dichorda, and Synchlora. The head is bifid, with two angular, forward-projecting points; two similar points are also found on the anterior edge of the prothorax (Forbes, 1948; Ferguson, 1985). Larvae of the Pistachio Emerald (Hethemia pistaciaria) are similar but have longer and more pointed horns (Ferguson, 1985; Wagner, 2005).
Larvae ID Requirements: Identifiable from good quality photos, especially where associated with known host plants.
Distribution in North Carolina
Distribution: Probably occurs statewide, from the Barrier Islands to the High Mountains
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Flight Dates:
 High Mountains (HM) ≥ 4,000 ft.
 Low Mountains (LM) < 4,000 ft.
 Piedmont (Pd)
 Coastal Plain (CP)

Click on graph to enlarge
Flight Comments: Adults fly nearly continuously from March to September in the Coastal Plain; records from the Piedmont and Mountains are insufficient to determine a pattern.
Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Like our flower-feeding species of Synchlora, most of our records for Chlorochlamys come from open, forb-rich habitats. These include old fields and disturbed areas but also natural habitats such as maritime dunes and marshes; Longleaf Pine savannas, flatwoods, and sandhills; and lake and river shorelines. Very few of our records come from deep within closed-canopy forests, especially where herbaceous species are scarce.
Larval Host Plants: Polyphagous, feeding on the flowers and berries of many species of forbs and shrubs. Blackberries (Rubus spp.) are commonly used (Forbes, 1984), but Ferguson (1985) and Wagner (2005) list many species of Composites as well as representatives of several other families.
Observation Methods: Comes well to blacklights but we have no records from bait or flowers.
Wikipedia
See also Habitat Account for General Successional Fields and Forblands
Status in North Carolina
Natural Heritage Program Status:
Natural Heritage Program Ranks: G5 [S5]
State Protection: Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.
Comments: This species is widespread, polyphagous on a extensive range of common plants, and occupies a broad set of habitats, including disturbed areas. Consequently, it appears to be secure within our state.

 Photo Gallery for Chlorochlamys chloroleucaria - Blackberry Looper

Photos: 28

Recorded by: tom ward on 2021-05-10
Buncombe Co.
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Recorded by: Dean Furbish on 2021-04-30
Wake Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2021-04-28
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2021-04-28
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: Dean Furbish on 2021-04-20
Wake Co.
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Recorded by: Dean Furbish on 2021-04-16
Wake Co.
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Recorded by: Dean Furbish on 2021-04-13
Wake Co.
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Recorded by: Steve Hall and Bo Sullivan on 2021-04-06
Moore Co.
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Recorded by: Dean Furbish on 2021-03-31
Wake Co.
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Recorded by: Dean Furbish on 2021-03-31
Wake Co.
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Recorded by: Steve Hall on 2020-06-22
Orange Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2020-05-16
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Owen and Pat McConnell on 2020-04-26
Durham Co.
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Recorded by: Mark Shields on 2020-03-18
Onslow Co.
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Recorded by: Simpson Eason on 2019-08-29
Durham Co.
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Recorded by: Simpson Eason on 2019-05-03
Durham Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2018-09-26
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Salman Abdulali on 2018-04-14
Scotland Co.
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Recorded by: K. Bischof on 2017-05-03
McDowell Co.
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Recorded by: K. Bischof on 2017-04-27
McDowell Co.
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Recorded by: j.wyche on 2016-05-04
Gates Co.
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Recorded by: Paul Scharf on 2016-04-23
Warren Co.
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Recorded by: Darryl Willis on 2015-04-30
Cabarrus Co.
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Recorded by: Paul Scharf on 2015-04-09
Warren Co.
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Recorded by: L. Amos on 2014-05-02
Warren Co.
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Recorded by: K. Bischof on 2014-04-30
McDowell Co.
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Recorded by: Paul Scharf on 2014-04-21
Warren Co.
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Recorded by: Paul Hart on 2006-06-20
Harnett Co.
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