Moths of North Carolina
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View PDFGelechiidae Members: 33 NC Records

Coleotechnites quercivorella (Chambers, 1872) - No Common Name


Taxonomy
Superfamily: Gelechioidea Family: GelechiidaeSubfamily: GelechiinaeTribe: GelechiiniP3 Number: 420747.00 MONA Number: 1828.00
Comments: The genus Coleotechnites includes 49 very small species that occur in North America. Most species are specialists on conifers and tend to use on a single genus of host plant. Many of the Coleotechnites species have almost identical genitalia that are not very useful in delineating closely related forms (Freeman, 1960; 1965). Freeman (1960) noted that host plants and the mining characteristics often provide the most reliable way to identify closely related species.
Identification
Field Guide Descriptions: Online Photographs: MPG, BugGuide, iNaturalist, Google, BAMONA                                                                                 
Adult Markings: The antenna is dark brownish black with faint lighter bands. The terminal joint of the labial palp is white with two dark rings. Individuals vary in general body patterning, but most have a band of grayish white to dirty white coloration that extends from the vertex to the thorax, and then as a narrow, wavy light stripe that extends along the dorsal margin from the wing base to near the apex. The thorax is often heavily dusted and on some individuals appears darker than the head. The remainder of the wing is heavily dusted with dark brown or blackish scales. Very heavily dusted individuals, which tend to prevail in North Carolina specimens, may have most of the area beneath the dorsal light stripe almost entirely black. There are three equally-spaced patches of dark, raised scales along the inner margin at about one-fourth, one-half, and three-fourths that are centered on the indentions on the dorsal stripe. On many individuals these are completely masked by the heavy black dusting. Lightly dusted individuals often show evidence of three blackish, diffuse, oblique bars that begin along the costa at about one-fourth, one-half, and three-fourths, but these are usually not evident due to the heavy black dusting on the wing. The dark bars are sometimes separated by dusted whitish blotches near the costa, but these are usually masked by the heavy black dusting on the forewing. A faint whitish costal spot is sometimes evident at about four-fifths, but is not prominant. The hindwing is silvery gray, and the fringe on both wings is mostly light gray. The front and middle legs are black with white banding, while the hind leg is creamy-white with black bands. Coleotechnites florae is a closely related species that closely resembles C. quercivorella. Both may be members of a species complex involving these two species and closely related genetic lineages (BOLD). They are most reliably determined by rearing adults from host plants, as is the case with many Coleotechnites species (Freeman, 1961). In North Carolina populations, C. quercivorella tends to be darker overall and lacks a well-developed whitish costal spot at about four-fifths that is present in C. florae. Intermediates are sometimes found that are difficult to place.
Adult ID Requirements: Identifiable from good quality photos of unworn specimens.
Distribution in North Carolina
Distribution: As currently recognized, Coleotechnites quercivorella is a wide-ranging species that appears to be a member of a species complex (seven BINS on BOLD). Populations that conform to this species have been found in many area of North America, including California, portions of southern Canada (British Columbia; Manitoba; Ontario; Quebec; Nova Scotia), and much of the eastern US westward to eastern Texas, Oklahoma, Wisconsin, and Minnesota.
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Flight Dates:
 High Mountains (HM) ≥ 4,000 ft.
 Low Mountains (LM) < 4,000 ft.
 Piedmont (Pd)
 Coastal Plain (CP)

Click on graph to enlarge
Flight Comments: Adults have been found from March through November in areas outside of North Carolina, with a seasonal peak in April and May.As of 2021, our records extend from late March through early September, with the main breeding bout during April and May.
Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Populations rely on oaks as host plants and can be found in a variety of hardwood and mixed conifer-hardwood forests, as well as semi-wooded residential neighborhoods with oaks.
Larval Host Plants: The larvae are known to use oaks (Marquis et al., 2019; Forbes, 1023), but details about host species are largely lacking. Northern Red Oak (Quercus rubra) and White Oak (Q. alba) are two of the known hosts, but other species are likely used.
Observation Methods: The adults are attracted to lights. More detail is needed on host plant use and the larval ecology, so we encourage individuals to search for and rear this and other oak feeders.
Wikipedia
See also Habitat Account for General Oak-Hickory Forests
Status in North Carolina
Natural Heritage Program Status:
Natural Heritage Program Ranks: GNR S4S5
State Protection: Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.
Comments: This species appears to be relatively secure within the state, given its wide distribution and use of oaks as hosts.

 Photo Gallery for Coleotechnites quercivorella - No common name

37 photos are available. Only the most recent 30 are shown.

Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2021-04-08
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2021-03-23
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2021-03-23
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2021-03-11
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2021-03-11
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2021-03-09
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Steve Hall on 2020-05-24
Orange Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2020-05-03
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2020-05-03
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2020-04-05
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2020-04-05
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2020-03-26
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2020-03-26
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2019-11-05
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2019-11-05
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2019-11-05
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2019-09-19
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2019-09-19
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2019-08-25
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2019-08-25
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2019-05-18
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2019-05-18
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2019-05-08
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2019-05-06
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2019-05-06
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: Darryl Willis on 2019-05-03
Cabarrus Co.
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Recorded by: Darryl Willis on 2019-05-01
Cabarrus Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2019-04-30
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2019-04-30
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2019-04-24
Madison Co.
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