Moths of North Carolina
Scientific Name:
Common Name:
Family (Alpha):
« »
View PDFMegalopygidae Members: 15 NC Records

Norape ovina (Sepp, 1848-52) - White Flannel Moth


Taxonomy
Superfamily: Zygaenoidea Family: MegalopygidaeP3 Number: 660068.00 MONA Number: 4650.00
Comments: One of three members of this genus in North America and the only eastern representative.
Identification
Field Guide Descriptions: Covell (1984)Online Photographs: MPG, BugGuide, BAMONATechnical Description, Adults: Forbes (1923)Technical Description, Immature Stages: Wagner (2005)                                                                                 
Adult Markings: Smaller than other flannel moths and slimmer in build. Wings are broad, shiny, satiny-white, as are the body, legs, and hindwings; long, white, silky tufts are located at the bases of the forewings and tufts on the head and the first abdominal segment are often tinged with pale yellow. If not examined closely, ovina could easily be passed off as Hyphantria cunea or any of several species of Spilosoma (unmarked forms). Separated from those species by proportionally shorter wings, long, straight hairs that protrude upward from the thorax, as well as orange, pectinate antennae.
Wingspan: 30 mm (Forbes, 1923)
Adult Structural Features: Antennae of the males are broadly pectinate and orange in color.
Adult ID Requirements: Identifiable from good quality photos of unworn specimens.
Immatures and Development: Larvae are strikingly different than other flannel moths by lacking the long, dense body hairs. The caterpillar is black with orange thoracic segments and distinct rows of yellow spots along the dorsum and sides, from which protrude stinging hairs (Wagner, 2005).
Larvae ID Requirements: Identifiable from good quality photos, especially where associated with known host plants.
Distribution in North Carolina
Distribution: Our records are so far confined to the Piedmont, although the host plants used by this species occupy a much wider range across the state
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Flight Dates:
 High Mountains (HM) ≥ 4,000 ft.
 Low Mountains (LM) < 4,000 ft.
 Piedmont (Pd)
 Coastal Plain (CP)

Click on graph to enlarge
Immature Dates:
 High Mountains (HM) ≥ 4,000 ft.
 Low Mountains (LM) < 4,000 ft.
 Piedmont (Pd)
 Coastal Plain (CP)

Click on graph to enlarge
Flight Comments: Has a single flight, with all of our records coming from the end of July and the beginning of August
Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Our few records come primarily from riparian habitats or lake shorelines.
Larval Host Plants: Forbes (1923) reported that Hackberry (Celtis spp.) is used as a host plant. Wagner (2005) lists a number of other wood species, including Redbud, Black Locust, Greenbriar, and Elm, with White Oak accepted in captivity.
Observation Methods: Almost all of our records come from the use of blacklights (one from building lights), but very few from traps as opposed to sheets. This suggests that it may settle fairly quickly once drawn into a light source and may be significantly undersampled where traps are used alone. Adults of this family have reduced mouth parts and probably do not feed; consequently, we have no records from bait or flowers.
Wikipedia
See also Habitat Account for Rich Wet-Dry Hardwood Forests
Status in North Carolina
Natural Heritage Program Status:
Natural Heritage Program Ranks: G4 [SU]
State Protection: Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it in state parks and on other public lands.
Comments: We have few records for this species but this may be due to our reliance on blacklight traps in most of the surveys conducted over the state. Larval searches or more extensive use of sheet sampling may turn up more populations, allowing a more accurate assessment to be made of its conservation status.

 Photo Gallery for Norape ovina - White Flannel Moth

Photos: 16

Recorded by: Kyle Kittelberger on 2020-07-12
Wake Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: David L. Heavner on 2019-07-11
Buncombe Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: David L. Heavner on 2019-07-11
Buncombe Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: Parker Backstrom on 2017-07-28
Chatham Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: Paul Scharf on 2015-08-06
Warren Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: Paul Scharf on 2015-08-06
Warren Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: B. Bockhahn, P. Coin, C. Sorenson on 2015-07-24
Orange Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: B. Bockhahn, P. Scharf, S. Hall on 2015-07-22
Stanly Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: T.Phillips on 2014-09-24
Rutherford Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: Lenny Lampel on 2014-07-27
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: Lenny Lampel on 2014-07-26
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: Darryl Willis on 2014-07-04
Cabarrus Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: Paul Scharf on 2011-08-02
Warren Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: Parker Backstrom on 2011-07-25
Chatham Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: Kyle Kittelberger on 2011-07-25
Wake Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2009-09-12
Madison Co.
Comment: