Butterflies of North Carolina:
their Distribution and Abundance

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Scientific Name begins with:
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Once on a species account page, clicking on the "View PDF" link will show the flight data for that species, for each of the three regions of the state.
Other information, such as high counts and earliest/latest dates, can also been seen on the PDF page.

Related Species in HESPERIIDAE:
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Common NameSouthern Broken-dash by Roger Rittmaster => Durham Co.
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[Google Images]     BoA [Images ]
Scientific NamePolites otho
Link to BAMONA species account.
MapClick on a county for list of all database records for the species in that county.
DistributionDISTRIBUTION: Throughout the Coastal Plain and Piedmont; scattered in the mountains. Possibly absent in some mountain counties, though likely present in all counties downstate. The lack of records for some of the middle Coastal Plain is certainly due to poor coverage in this region.
AbundanceABUNDANCE: Fairly common over most of the Coastal Plain and the eastern Piedmont. Uncommon in the central Piedmont, rare in the western Piedmont, and very rare in the mountains. In the mountains, probably absent above 3500 feet.
FlightFLIGHT PERIOD: Two broods downstate; mid-May to mid-June, and mid- or late July to late September, very rarely to early October. The few records from the mountains suggest flight periods from mid-May to late June, and mid-August to early September; but many more records are needed to be certain, especially for the second brood.
HabitatHABITAT: The species has a tendency to occur in or near wetlands, but not in truly wet places. Typical habitats are the edges of bottomlands or pocosins, marsh borders, moist powerline clearings, and particularly savannas. It can be seen in drier places, but it is not to be intentionally searched for in uplands. In fact, it can be locally numerous in some gardens/arboretums, as long as the foodplants are nearby.
See also Habitat Account for General Open, Wet Forblands
PlantsFOOD AND NECTAR PLANTS: Various crowngrasses (Paspalum spp.) are the foodplants. The species nectars on many plants, such as forbs growing in savannas -- blazing-stars (Liatris spp.), etc. Individuals even visit gardens and nurseries, such as the Raulston Arboretum in Raleigh and the Sarah Duke Gardens in Durham.
CommentsCOMMENTS: This is a widespread, though seldom very numerous, species of damp places in the Coastal Plain and lower Piedmont. Savannas are the best places to look for them, but I have seen them on a number of occasions along powerline clearings where the ground is damp. Though similar in pattern to the Northern Broken-dash, I have seldom had trouble distinguishing the two (unless they are very worn), as the Southern Broken-dash has a rich or warm rusty color, as opposed to a cold or dull brown of the Northern Broken-dash.


State RankS5
State Status
Global RankG5
Federal Status
SynonymWallengrenia otho
Other NameBroken Dash, Southern Broken-Dash


Links to other butterfly galleries: [Cook] [Lynch] [Pippen] [Pugh]
Photo Gallery for Southern Broken-dash
Photo by: Shay Garriock
Comment: 22-Aug-2007; Columbus Co.
Southern Broken-dash - Click to enlarge
Photo by: Randy Newman
Comment: Fort Macon State Park, Carteret Co.; 2017-Nov-22
Southern Broken-dash - Click to enlarge
Photo by: Richard Stickney
Comment: female. October 3, 2014, Durham Co.
Southern Broken-dash - Click to enlarge
Photo by: Richard Stickney
Comment: male. July 30, 2010
Southern Broken-dash - Click to enlarge
Photo by: Sven Halling
Comment: May 31, 2013, Pilot Mountain State Park, Surry County
Southern Broken-dash - Click to enlarge
Photo by: Salman Abdulali
Comment: 2012-July-12. Pitt County Arboretum, Pitt Co.
Southern Broken-dash - Click to enlarge
Photo by: Salman Abdulali
Comment: 2012-July-12. Male. Pitt County Arboretum, Pitt Co.
Southern Broken-dash - Click to enlarge