Butterflies of North Carolina:
their Distribution and Abundance

Common Name begins with:
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Scientific Name begins with:
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Once on a species account page, clicking on the "View PDF" link will show the flight data for that species, for each of the three regions of the state.
Other information, such as high counts and earliest/latest dates, can also been seen on the PDF page.

Related Species in HESPERIIDAE:
comNameBrazilian Skipper by Randy Newman => 2003-09-24, Ft. Macon State Park
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Click to enlarge
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sciNameCalpodes ethlius
Link to BAMONA species account.
mapClick on a county for list of all database records for the species in that county.
distributionDISTRIBUTION: Primarily a migrant from farther south, but which oviposits in the state and produces one or two additional broods in late summer and fall. Widely scattered records throughout the Coastal Plain and the southeastern half of the Piedmont, with a first record for the foothills (McDowell County) in 2012. A belated record from the mountains, in Ashe County, was made in 2014 (but not reported until two years later). It has been found on the Outer Banks. It was recorded in three new counties (Alamance, Cleveland, and Richmond), all well inland, in 2018.
abundanceABUNDANCE: Rare, but somewhat erratic in numbers from year to year. In most years, a few are reported, but a population boom in the Eastern US was noted in 2018 and a remarkable 40 records were made in NC in that year. As might be expected, it is more frequently reported from the extreme southern coast (Brunswick and New Hanover counties) than elsewhere.
flightFLIGHT PERIOD: This migrant occurs mostly in late summer and fall, from mid-July to early December. Quite amazing was an individual photographed on April 28, 2006, by Randy Newman; this is our first spring record. The Ashe County sighting was on July 10, one of the earliest records in the state. In 2018, enough adults had emerged in some areas by July that one or two additional broods were noted; for example, at the Raulston Arboretum in Raleigh, there was a strong brood of adults in August, and another brood of fresh adults was seen in October.
habitatHABITAT: This species is found in the usual places for southern migrants -- weedy fields, roadsides, gardens, and other sunny and disturbed places. Stands of canna are the best places to look for the species; as this plant isn't native to NC, residential areas, golf courses, nurseries, arboretums, etc., that have canna patches are additional places to search.
plantsFOOD AND NECTAR PLANTS: The foodplants are well known to be robust herbs in the canna family (Marantaceae), especially Canna flaccida. The adults nectar on many flowers; males often patrol stands of canna when in bloom.
commentsCOMMENTS: This is a large, robust species that can scarcely be confused. Some, or perhaps most, of the individuals seen in NC have been fresh. They might have come from eggs laid in the state. Obviously, complete details of the flight period and life history of the species are not well known in NC. Some of the records are based on caterpillars found on cannas. In fact, searching for caterpillars is the easiest way to document the presence of the species, and the 2003 records for Durham, Orange and Scotland counties are based on such larval records. John Dole's report of five adults flying around canna stands at a nursery in Wake County in August 2002 was the precursor of a good fall season. Jeff Pippen and I, while scanning mostly lantanas at a golf course near Sunset Beach for southern strays, stumbled onto adult Brazilian Skippers "guarding" most sizable stands of canna along the roadsides, in September 2002. Our count of 13 adults has been the highest count reported in NC. Jamie Cameron made a remarkable discovery of an adult seen at a garden at Lake James State Park in McDowell County on August 24, 2012. Unfortunately, no adult Brazilian Skippers were reported in the state in 2013. Thankfully, despite a very poor year for migrant species (in general), there were 11 reports of adults in 2014, including three reports from the Piedmont. Also, 2016 was a rather good year for them, with nine reports, from both the Piedmont and the Coastal Plain. As mentioned above, there were an amazing 40 reports in the state in NC in 2018, which amounted to nearly half of all previous state reports (93) through 2017!
state_statusSZB
fed_statusG5
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page_num174
sort_order174.0

Links to other butterfly galleries: [Cook] [Lynch] [Pippen] [Pugh]
Photo Gallery for Brazilian Skipper
Photo by: Tom Stock
Comment: Duck, Dare County, on August 15, 2006
Brazilian Skipper - Click to enlarge
Photo by: Tom Stock
Comment: Duck, Dare County, on August 15, 2006
Brazilian Skipper - Click to enlarge
Photo by: Salman Abdulali
Comment: Chrysalis - 2018-06-17 at the Pitt County Arboretum.
Brazilian Skipper - Click to enlarge
Photo by: Rob Van Epps
Comment: Sep 12, 2003. Mecklenburg Co.
Brazilian Skipper - Click to enlarge
Photo by: Rob Van Epps
Comment: Sep 12, 2003. Mecklenburg Co.
Brazilian Skipper - Click to enlarge
Photo by: John Ennis
Comment: 8/18/12 Tinga Nursery, Castle Hayne, New Hanover County, NC
Brazilian Skipper - Click to enlarge
Photo by: Salman Abdulali
Comment: Pitt County Arboretum, first county record - 2012-06-28
Brazilian Skipper - Click to enlarge