Moths of North Carolina
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33 NC Records

Choristoneura fractivittana (Clemens, 1865) - Broken-banded Leafroller Moth


Taxonomy
Superfamily: Tortricoidea Family: TortricidaeSubfamily: TortricinaeTribe: ArchipiniP3 Number: 620297.00 MONA Number: 3632.00
Identification
Field Guide Descriptions: Covell (1984); Beadle and Leckie (2012)Online Photographs: MPG, BugGuide, iNaturalist, Google, BAMONA, GBIF, BOLDTechnical Description, Adults: Forbes (1923)Technical Description, Immature Stages: Chapman and Lienk (1971)                                                                                 
Adult Markings: The following description is based in part on that of Forbes (1923). The head, palps, antennae, and thorax vary from orangish-yellow to light yellowish-brown. The forewing ground is orangish-yellow to olivaceous and is overlain by a brown, posteriorly oblique band that extends from the costa near the middle to the inner margin at about two-thirds. The band fades or is broken by ground color near the middle and is two or more times wider on the dorsal half compared with the costal half. The other prominent mark is a dark brown, semi-oval costal spot at around three-fourths. Relative to the general ground color, the costal margin is lighter-colored between the median band and costal spot, and between the median band and the basal one-fourth. In addition to these marks, patches of light brown scaling is often present at the wing base and along the inner margin between the median band and the wing base. The fringe varies from light brown to orangish-brown. The hindwing of the male is uniformly dark fuscous, while that of the female is fuscous with a yellowish or tan apical region. The males has small costal fold at about one-fourth.
Wingspan: 18-28 mm (Forbes, 1923)
Adult Structural Features: Dang (1992) has detailed descriptions and illustrations of the male genitalia.
Adult ID Requirements: Identifiable from good quality photos of unworn specimens.
Immatures and Development: The larvae are polyphagous and mostly feed on deciduous trees, including apples. The following account of the larval life history is based on that of Chapman and Lienk (1971) in New York and Hall (1934) in Ontario. This species overwinters as half-grown larvae that complete their development during the spring warm-up. The larvae construct leaf shelters on the host trees, but very few specifics have been reported on the larval life history. Pupation occurs at the final feeding sites and the adults emerge in about 10 days or more. The females lay patches of dull orange eggs on the upper surfaces of host leaves and the eggs hatch in about 10 days. The larvae feed on the leaves until they reach the mid-instar stages, then construct hibernacula for overwintering. Chapman and Lienk (1971) surmised that the larvae often leave the leaves much like C. rosaceana and construct overwintering cocoons or hibernacula in bark crevices or other protected sites, but this needs to be verified with direct observations.
Larvae ID Requirements: Identifiable only through rearing to adulthood.
Distribution in North Carolina
Distribution: Choristoneura fractivittana occupies much of the eastern US and adjoining areas of southern Canada (Manitoba eastward to Nova Scotia). In the US the range extends from Maine southward to northern Florida, and westward to eastern Texas, eastern Oklahoma, Missouri, eastern Nebraska, Minnesota and eastern North Dakota. This species occurs statewide in North Carolina.
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Flight Dates:
 High Mountains (HM) ‚Č• 4,000 ft.
 Low Mountains (LM) < 4,000 ft.
 Piedmont (Pd)
 Coastal Plain (CP)

Click on graph to enlarge
Flight Comments: The adults have been documented from March through August in different areas of the range, with a seasonal peak typically from April through June. Poplations in North Carolina are univoltine, which appears to be the case for populations in most of the range. As of 2023, our records extend from late-March through early June.
Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Local populations are generally found in bottomland and mesic deciduous forests, as well as wooded residential neighborhoods.
Larval Host Plants: The larvae are polyphagous and mostly feed on deciduous trees (Baker, 1972; Freeman, 1958; Heppner, 2007; Marquis et al., 2019; Prentice, 1966; Robinson et al., 2010; Wagner et al., 1995), although they occasionally found on brambles (Rubus). Trees that are used include Red Maple (Acer rubrum), Sugar Maple (A. saccharum), Silver Maple (A. saccharinum), Paper Birch (Betula papyrifera), American Beech (Fagus grandifolia), domesticated apples (Malus domestica), pears (Pyrus), White Oak (Quercus alba), Scarlet Oak (Q. coccinea), Northern Red Oak (Q. rubra), Black Oak (Q. velutina) and American Elm (Ulmus americana). - View
Observation Methods: The adults are attracted to lights.
Wikipedia
Status in North Carolina
Natural Heritage Program Status:
Natural Heritage Program Ranks: GNR [S4-S5]
State Protection: Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.
Comments: This species is widespread within the state and there is no evidence of marked population declines.

 Photo Gallery for Choristoneura fractivittana - Broken-banded Leafroller Moth

33 photos are available. Only the most recent 30 are shown.

Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2024-05-20
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: David George, Jeff Niznik on 2024-04-29
Chatham Co.
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Recorded by: David George, Stephen Dunn, Jeff Niznik on 2024-04-29
Chatham Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2023-05-26
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2022-06-07
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: Darryl Willis on 2021-06-01
Cabarrus Co.
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Recorded by: tom ward on 2021-05-24
Buncombe Co.
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Recorded by: David L. Heavner on 2021-04-27
Chatham Co.
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Recorded by: Mark Shields on 2021-04-27
Onslow Co.
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Recorded by: Erich Hofmann on 2021-04-15
New Hanover Co.
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Recorded by: Erich Hofmann on 2021-04-15
New Hanover Co.
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Recorded by: Mark Shields on 2020-05-01
Onslow Co.
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Recorded by: Erich Hofmann on 2020-04-24
Craven Co.
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Recorded by: Mark Shields on 2020-04-18
Onslow Co.
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Recorded by: Mark Shields on 2020-04-03
Onslow Co.
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Recorded by: Ken Kneidel on 2019-05-31
Yancey Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2019-05-11
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2019-05-11
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: Vin Stanton on 2018-05-18
Buncombe Co.
Comment: Male, showing costal fold
Recorded by: Vin Stanton on 2018-05-18
Buncombe Co.
Comment: Male, showing costal fold
Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2018-05-17
Madison Co.
Comment: Male, showing costal fold
Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2018-05-17
Madison Co.
Comment: Male, showing costal fold
Recorded by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn on 2017-05-02
Stokes Co.
Comment: Male, showing costal fold
Recorded by: B. Bockhahn; P. Scharf, L. Amos on 2015-05-12
Warren Co.
Comment: Male, showing costal fold
Recorded by: B. Bockhahn on 2015-04-23
Stokes Co.
Comment: Male, showing costal fold
Recorded by: Lenny Lampel on 2012-04-19
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: Male, showing costal fold
Recorded by: T. DeSantis on 2011-04-29
Camden Co.
Comment: Male, showing costal fold
Recorded by: Lori Owenby on 2011-04-29
Catawba Co.
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Recorded by: Harry Wilson on 2011-04-27
Wake Co.
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Recorded by: Lori Owenby on 2011-03-21
Catawba Co.
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