Moths of North Carolina
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Inga cretacea
Chalky Inga Moth
MONA_number: 1035.00
Clarke (1941). The labial palps, head, and forewing is white to sordid white and more or less sprinkled with small brown scales. The basal two-fifths of the second segment of the labial palp is brown ............Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands....
Glenoides texanaria
Texas Gray Moth
MONA_number: 6443.00
The genus is limited to North America with two species, one of which occurs in North Carolina.This species is small, but patterned like several other species loosely termed the Grays. In fresh specimens look for the reddish-orange band between the medial and postmedial lines. Glenoides is mos...Found in nearly all natural habitats in the state, ranging from maritime scrub and forests on the Barrier Islands, deep swamps, peatlands and Longleaf Pine habitats in the Coastal Plain, to bottomland...For many years the life history has been a mystery. However, Dale Habeck reared G. texanaria from lichens associated with Crateagus, Quercus, and Ceratiola in Florida (Matthews, et al. 2014). Wagner ...Adults are attracted to lights. Caterpillars should be sought by brushing the lichens on the host trees. Like some of the other lichen feeders, they may also be collected by beating the lichen encru...Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.G5 [S5]Broadly distributed across the state and found in a very wide range of habitats, this species appears to be quite secure in the state....
Inga sparsiciliella
Black-marked Inga Moth
MONA_number: 1034.00
This species is distinctive in having sharply contrasting black marks on a white or light yellowish white background. The detailed description that follows is primarily based on Clarke (1941). The gro...The larvae have never been discovered and the habitats are poorly documented. Many of our records are from semi-wooded residential neighborhoods. Others include an old field, a pasture and forest inte...Despite being widespread and somewhat common in the eastern US, the hosts have never been discovered. This is the case for almost every Inga species in North America. Hodges (1974) noted that ...The adults are attracted to lights. ...Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.GNR [S4S5]This species occurs statewide and is seemingly secure. ...
Gonioterma mistrella
MONA_number: 1032.00
Gonioterma is a small genus with around 35 recognized species that are mostly neotropical. There are only two described species in North America. Gonioterma mistrella was previously placed in the genus Stenoma until it was recently split off as a separate genus. The following is based primarily on descriptions by Busck (1907) and Duckworth (1964). The face, head, and thorax are light ocherous. The long, recurved labial palp is smooth and light fuscous, and th...The habitats are poorly documented. This species appears to use introduced pasture grasses as hosts, and presumably other undocumented native grasses in the Poaceae. Our one site record as of 2020 i...The only recorded hosts are two exotic grasses: Common Timothy (Phleum pratense) and Kentucky Bluegrass (Poa pratensis).......Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.GNR SUAs of 2020, we have only a single site record for this species that is from a residential neighborhood. We need additional information on this species distribution and abundance within the state befo...
Rectiostoma xanthobasis
Yellow-vested Moth
MONA_number: 1026.00
This is a boldly marked moth with black and lemon-yellow patterning on the basal third that is diagnostic. The following detailed description is based on that of Duckworth (1964). The face and labial ...The larvae exploit a variety of oaks that grow in habitats ranging from moist bottomland forests and mesic slopes to dry ridges and south-facing slopes. Many of our records are from semi-wooded reside...The larvae are specialists on oaks (Robinson et al., 2002; Marquis et al., 2019). The reported hosts include White Oak (Quercus alba), Laurel Oak (Q. laurifolia), Chinquapin Oak (Q. m...The adults are attracted to lights. ...Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.GNR [S4S5]This oak specialist occurs statewide and populations appear to be secure. ...
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Menesta melanella
MONA_number: 1031.00
This is one of only two species of Menesta that occur north of Mexico, and both occur in the eastern US. Adults are readily identified by the conspicuous whitish triangular mark that occurs about midway on the costa of each forewing. A small white dot occurs near the tip of each triangular mark. The frin...The larvae are most commonly found on two species of oaks that are associated with dry, upland forests or xeric habitats such as sandhills, south-facing slopes, dry ridges and rocky bluffs. ...This species is a specialist on oaks. Post Oak (Q. stellata) and Black Oak (Q. velutina) appear to be important primary hosts (Murtfeldt, 1890; Duckworth 1964; Marquis et al., 2019). Oth...Adults are attracted to blacklights. ...Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.[GNR] [SU]We have only a few records for NC as of 2019 even though the host plants are relatively abundant within the state. This species appears to be generally uncommon throughout its range, with most states...
Caloptilia ostryaeella
MONA_number: 618.00
Caloptilia is a large genus with nearly 300 described species; 64 species have been described in North America north of Mexico. The larvae begin as leaf-mining sap-feeders, but the latter instars usually exit the mines and feed within a conical roll that begins at the leaf apex or at the tip of a leaf lobe.This species is unusual among our Caloptilia in showing seasonal dimorphism that involves summer and autumn color morphs that differ markedly in patterning and coloration (Braun, 1912). In the ...This species is restricted to habitats that support Ostrya and Carpinus. These small, deciduous trees generally prefer alluvial forests and stream bank habitats (Carpinus) or ric...American Hop-hornbeam (Ostrya virginiana) and American Hornbeam (Carpinus caroliniana) are the only known host plants. ......Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.GNR SU...
Caloptilia negundella
Boxelder Leafroller Moth
MONA_number: 615.00
The following is based primarily on descriptions in Forbes (1923) and Chambers (1876a). The head, thorax and ground color of the forewing are light tawny brown to golden brown. The face is pale below ...Local populations are dependent on Box-elder. This species is common in alluvial forests and along streambanks in the mountains and Piedmont. It also can occasionally be found in upland sites with nu...This species is monophagous on Box-elder (Acer negundo)....The adults are attracted to lights, and the leaf blotch mines and rolled leaflets are easy to spot on Box-elder. ...Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.GNR SUWe currently do not have sufficient information on the distribution and abundance of this species to assess its conservation status. ...
Lomographa glomeraria
Gray Spring Moth
MONA_number: 6668.00
...Wagner et al. (2001) list shrubby fields, woodlands, and forest as habitat for this species. Our records come mainly from montane hardwood forests but there are also a few from mixed habitats, includi...Larvae feed on Cherry, Hawthorn, and possibly other species in the Rosaceae (Wagner et al., 2001)......Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.G5 S4S5...
Antaeotricha albulella
MONA_number: 1024.00
The genus Antaeotricha is endemic to the New World and includes nearly 400 species of mostly neotropical species. Twenty species are currently recognized in North America. The following is based on the description by Duckworth (1964). The face is white and the labial palp is white with dusky scales on the exterior sides in the male. The legs are white and speckled with ...The larvae appear to be specialists on oaks, and primarily on species that inhabit dry to xeric habitats. Our records include costal dune scrub and maritime forest habitats. The habitats that are use...Hosts that were reported by Hayden and Dickel (2015) for Florida specimens included Bluejack Oak (Q. incana), Turkey Oak (Quercus laevis), Myrtle Oak (Q. myrtifolia), Water Oak (...The adults are attracted to lights. ...Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.GNR SUWe currently do not have sufficient information on the distribution and abundance of this species to assess its conservation status. ...
sciNametaxonomic_commentsid_commentshabitatfoodobservation_methodsstate_protectionNHP_ranksstatus_comments
Antaeotricha humilis
Dotted Anteotricha Moth
MONA_number: 1019.00
The genus Antaeotricha is endemic to the New World and includes nearly 400 species of mostly neotropical species. Twenty species are currently recognized in North America. The following is based primarily on descriptions by Forbes (1923) and Duckworth (1964). The face is white and sprinkled with brown, while the labial palp is similar but only sprinkled with brown exter...This species is an oak specialist and uses numerous species that inhabit a diversity of habitats. The host species inhabitat sites that range from wet bottomland forests, to sandy, xeric sites in the ...The larvae specialize on oaks and use numerous species. Hosts listed by Robinson et al. (2010), Heppner (2003) and Marquis et al. (2019) include White Oak (Quercus alba), Bear Oak (Q. ilici...The adults are attracted to lights. ...Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.GNR [S4S5]Populations occur statewide and appear to be secure. ...
Antaeotricha decorosella
MONA_number: 1016.00
The genus Antaeotricha is endemic to the New World and includes nearly 400 species of mostly neotropical species. Twenty species are currently recognized in North America. The following is based on the description by Busck (1908) and Duckworth (1964). The face and head are whitish ocherous. The labial palp is brownish ocherous, with the tip of the second joint and base...The habitats are poorly documented. The known oak hosts are associated with dry to xeric forested habitats such as south-facing slopes or dry rocky ridge lines. ...Duckworth (1964) listed Bear Oak Quercus ilicifolia and Blackjack Oak Q. marilandica as hosts. ...The adults occasionally visit lights. ...Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.GNR SHWe have only a single historical record from the vicinity of Tryon in Polk County. ...
Antaeotricha osseella
MONA_number: 1015.00
The genus Antaeotricha is endemic to the New World and includes nearly 400 species of mostly neotropical species. Twenty species are currently recognized in North America. The following description is primarily from Duckworth (1964). The face, labial palps, and dorsum of the head are whitish and sprinkled with brown scales. The thorax and forewing are concolorous and va...Local populations are found in forested habitats with oaks. Most of the host species are found in mesic to dry habitats such as oak-hickory forests, mesic upland slopes, and rocky, dry ridges. ...The larvae appear to only feed on oaks (Robinson et al, 2010; Marquis et al., 2019). The known hosts include White Oak (Quercus alba), Scarlet Oak (Q. coccinea), Shingle Oak (Q. imbri...The adults are attracted to lights, and individuals have been successfully reared from larvae in tied oak leaves. ...Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.GNR SHWe have only three historical records for this species from two sites in the mountains. ...
Antaeotricha leucillana
Pale Gray Bird-dropping Moth
MONA_number: 1014.00
The genus Antaeotricha is endemic to the New World and includes nearly 400 species of mostly neotropical species. Twenty species are currently recognized in North America. This species is very similar to A. schlaegeri and the two cannot be reliably separated using photographs. The following description is based in part on the description by Duckworth (1964) and a...The larvae are polyphagous and use numerous species of hardwood trees. Local populations occur in wooded residential neighborhoods as well as natural communities such as bottomland forests, mesic har...The larvae feed on a diverse group of hardwood trees, and do not strongly depend on oaks as is the case with A. schlaegeri. The known hosts (Robinson et al., 2010) include Red Maple (Acer ru...The adults occasionally visit lights....Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.GNR [S3-S5)Populations appear to be locally common where suitable hardwood forests are present. ...
Antaeotricha schlaegeri
Schlaeger's Fruitworm Moth
MONA_number: 1011.00
The genus Antaeotricha is endemic to the New World and includes nearly 400 species of mostly neotropical species. Twenty species are currently recognized in North America. The following description is based in part on the description by Duckworth (1964). The face is white and the labial palp is white with a sprinkling of gray to dusky scales. The thorax is white dorsall...This species is strongly dependent for oaks as hosts for the larvae. Local populations occur in wooded residential neighborhoods as well as in a variety of mesic to drier forests with oaks. Populatio...Oaks are the primary hosts, although there is one record of larvae using Paper Birch (Betula papyrifera) in Canada (Robinson et al. 2010). Oak hosts (Marquis et al., 2019) include White Oak (<...The adults are attracted to UV lights; larvae need to be reared to distinguish them from A. leucillana. ...Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.GNR [S4S5]This species appears to be relatively common in the mountains and Piedmont where oaks are important components of hardwood forests. ...
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Tetanolita mynesalis
Smoky Tetanolita Moth
MONA_number: 8366.00
...This species has one of the widest habitat ranges of any of our species, occurring in maritime grasslands and forests on the barrier islands to high elevation forests on the top of Grandfather Mountai.........Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands....
Cossula magnifica
Pecan Carpenterworm Moth
MONA_number: 2674.00
A resident of the southeastern U.S., this is the sole representative of the genus in North America.Distinctive. The basal three-quarters of the forewing is powdery-gray (lightest subterminally) with fine black striations, heaviest at the base. The end of the forewing bears a creamy-brown elliptical...North Carolina records for this species come from a wide range of woody habitats, including maritime forest and scrub, xeric Carolina bay rims and sandhills, mesic hardwood slopes and ridges, reservoi...Larvae are borers in oaks and hickories, including Live Oak (Bailey, 1892). Pecan and Persimmon have also been specifically as hosts used by this species (Covell, 1984), as have Southern Red Oak and C...Attracted to lights but since the mouthparts of the adults are rudimentary, they do not feed and consequently do not come to bait or visit flowers....Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it in state parks and on other public lands.G5 [S4]Uncommon to locally common in the Coastal Plain and Piedmont but apparently rare in or absent from the Mountains....
Cisthene packardii
Packard's Lichen Moth
MONA_number: 8072.00
One of twenty species in this genus that occur in North America, five of which have been recorded in North CarolinaSimilar to but slightly larger than Cisthene subjecta. Dark gray with a thin yellow or gray line along the costa and a similarly colored submedian band located parallel to but above the inner margin;...Our records come from virtually all types of forests and shrublands found in the state, from maritime scrub, peatlands, and Longleaf Pine savannas and sandhills in the Coastal Plain to riparian hardwo...Like most Lithosiines, probably feeds on lichens, bark algae, and Cyanobacteria (Covell, 1984; Wagner, 2005)...Comes well to blacklights; none of our records come from bait...Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public landsG5 [S5]As a common, widely distributed species occupying an extremely broad set of habitats, this species appears to be secure in the state...
Acleris nivisellana
Snowy-shouldered Acleris Moth
MONA_number: 3510.00
......Larvae feed on a number of species of the Rosaceae, including Hawthorn, Apple, Ninebark, Cherry, and Mountain-ash (Brown et al., 2008)......Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.GNR SU...
Taniva albolineana
Spruce Needleminer Moth
MONA_number: 2745.00
...Our one recent (2002) record for this species comes from the Spruce-Fir zone at the summit of Clingman's Dome...Larvae feed on Spruce (Picea sp.) and Fir (Abies sp.) (Brown et al., 2008)......Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.GNR S1S3...
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Psilocorsis quercicella
Oak Leaftier Moth
MONA_number: 955.00
Psilocorsis is a small genus with around 15 described species and several undescribed forms. They range from southeastern Canada to northern South America, but appear to be absent from the West Coast (Hodges, 1974). Seven species occur in North America north of Mexico (Pohl et al., 2016), three of which have been recorded in North Carolina.The following is primarily based on descriptions in Forbes (1923) and Clarke (1941). The head and thorax are dark yellowish brown and the labial palp is slender, strongly recurved, and pointed. The se...This species is dependent on hardwoods for successful reproduction, and appears to rely more on oaks than any other group of hardwoods (Marquis et al., 2019). Most of our records are from the Piedmon...Oaks appear to be the primary hosts (Clarke, 1941; Hodges, 1974, Robinson et al. 2010; Marquis et al., 2019), but the larvae also feed on American Chestnut (Castanea dentata) and American Beech...The adults are attracted to lights, and the larvae can be found beneath the tied leaves of oaks, American Beech and other host plants. ...Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.GNR S3S5Populations appear to be widespread and somewhat common in the Piedmont and lower mountains despite the fact that many hardwood forests have been timbered and replaced with agricultural lands or stand...
Platynota idaeusalis
Tufted Apple Budmoth
MONA_number: 3740.00
.........Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands....
Antaeotricha unidentified species
MONA_number: 1025.11
The genus Antaeotricha is endemic to the New World and includes nearly 400 species of mostly neotropical species. Twenty species are currently recognized in North America. ...............
Caloptilia triadicae
MONA_number: 644.10
This species was only recently described by Davis et al. (2013).This species has distinctive markings that readily distinguish it from our native Caloptilia. The forewing has two slightly oblique whitish stripes that begin near the costa and a third oblique...This species is monophagous on Chinese Tallow-tree, which is an introduced species that has a tendency to become invasive. This species is often seen in moist to wet habitats that are sunny to partly ...In North Carolina, Caloptilia triadicae only feeds on the Chinese Tallow-tree (Triadica sebifera). ...Adults are attracted to UV-lights, and the leaf mines and rolled leaves are conspicuous on Triadica sebifera. ...GNR [SNA]We have no conservation concerns about this species since it is introduced and restricts its feeding on a host plant that is also introduced. Caloptilia triadicae may prove to be beneficial is...
Acleris ptychogrammos
MONA_number: 3509.00
............Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands....
sciNametaxonomic_commentsid_commentshabitatfoodobservation_methodsstate_protectionNHP_ranksstatus_comments
Eucirroedia pampina
Scalloped Sallow
MONA_number: 9952.00
A genus with one moderately large species from eastern and central North America. Apparently, it is not closely related to any other genus of the “glaeas”.This brightly colored orange moth is not likely confused with any other species flying at the same time. Anomis privata has a similar appearance but the cross lines and spots are very different....This species appears to occupy a wide range of forest and woodland habitats in North Carolina. Our records from the Coastal Plain come from Longleaf Pine sandhills and probably dry sand ridges at Merc...In the field, larvae have been found on Wild Strawberry and Lowbush Blueberry (Wagner et al, 2011) but plants used in North Carolina are unknown....Adults come to light and like other “glaeas” probably are attracted to bait, although we have not observed it. Usually collected as singletons in light traps in the early Fall. ...Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.G5 [SU]Possibly more common than it seems but very little is known of its preferred habitats or foodplants....
Bucculatrix pomifoliella
MONA_number: 577.00
One of 103 species in this genus that occur in North America north of Mexico (Pohl et al., 2016), twelve of which have been recorded in North CarolinaA minute brownish white moth with a dark oval patch on the dorsal surface of the forewings when held at rest. The ground color of the forewings, the head, and thorax is white but somewhat dusted with ...The habitats are unrecorded where this species has been collected in North Carolina but probably include both mesic forests and old fields, based on the host plants reported for this species....Larvae are probably polyphagous, feeding on a variety of trees and shrubs in the Rosaceae, including Amelanchier, Prunus, Crataegus, Malus, and Physocarpus (Braun, 1963). ...Probably most easily detected as larvae...Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.GNR [SU]We have only a couple of historical records for this species but given its host plant range, it is likey to be fairly common, at least in the Mountains....
Mompha eloisella
Red-streaked Mompha Moth
MONA_number: 1443.00
The genus Mompha consists of around 46 described species in North America. In addition, numerous species remain to be described that are centered in the southwestern US (Bruzzese et al., 2019). The adults are small moths that have two or more tufts of raised scales on each forewing. The larvae either mine leaves, or bore into the stems, flower buds, flowers, or fruits of their hosts. The majority of species feed on members of the Onagraceae, but others feed on species in the Cistaceae, Lythraceae, Melastomataceae, and Rubiaceae.............Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands....
Autosticha kyotensis
Kyoto Moth (Introduced, Japan)
MONA_number: 1010.10
The following is based on the description by Ueda (1997). The head is grayish buff and the individual scales are tipped with pale fuscous. The antenna is yellowish ocherous with narrow pale fuscous an...The hosts plants in the US are unknown. Most of our records are from residential neighborhoods. ...This species uses Deodar Cedar (Cedrus deodora) and Japanese Apricot (Prunus mume) in Japan (Ueda, 1997). The hosts that are used in the US are unknown. ...The adults are attracted to lights. ...Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.GNR SNAThis is an introduced species that does not merit protection....
Mompha brevivittella
MONA_number: 1430.00
The genus Mompha consists of around 46 described species in North America. In addition, numerous species remain to be described that are centered in the southwestern US (Bruzzese et al., 2019). The adults are small moths that have two or more tufts of raised scales on each forewing. The larvae either mine leaves, or bore into the stems, flower buds, flowers, or fruits of their hosts. The majority of species feed on members of the Onagraceae, but others feed on species in the Cistaceae, Lythraceae, Melastomataceae, and Rubiaceae.............Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands....
sciNametaxonomic_commentsid_commentshabitatfoodobservation_methodsstate_protectionNHP_ranksstatus_comments
Mompha circumscriptella
Circumscript Mompha Moth
MONA_number: 1434.00
The genus Mompha consists of around 46 described species in North America. In addition, numerous species remain to be described that are centered in the southwestern US (Bruzzese et al., 2019). The adults are small moths that have two or more tufts of raised scales on each forewing. The larvae either mine leaves, or bore into the stems, flower buds, flowers, or fruits of their hosts. The majority of species feed on members of the Onagraceae, but others feed on species in the Cistaceae, Lythraceae, Melastomataceae, and Rubiaceae.............Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands....
Mompha bottimeri
Bottimer's Mompha Moth
MONA_number: 1429.00
...............
Erannis tiliaria
Linden Looper
MONA_number: 6665.00
This genus, comprising some 9-12 species depending upon how various subspecies are treated, is limited to the northern parts of America, Europe, Turkey and Japan, with most species concentrated in Russia. One species occurs in North America, including North Carolina.The male is a large brown, almost translucent species unlike anything else in our fauna. The female is virtually wingless, black and white. ...The majority of our records come from the Mountains at relatively low elevations, with habitats consisting primarily of hardwood forests growing on slopes and ridges. One record also comes from aroun...Polyphagous, feeding on a wide range of woody shrubs and trees (Wagner, 2005)...Males come to light readily but we have no records of them coming to bait. The wingless females should be looked for on the trunks of trees....Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.G4? [SU]We have relatively few records for this species, possibly due to its late flight period. It does not appear to be a strong habitat specialist, however, and apparently uses a wide range of host plants....
Glyphidocera dimorphella
MONA_number: 1143.00
.........Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands....
Psilocorsis reflexella
Dotted Leaftier Moth
MONA_number: 957.00
Psilocorsis is a small genus with around 15 described species and several undescribed forms. They range from southeastern Canada to northern South America, but appear to be absent from the West Coast (Hodges, 1974). Seven species occur in North America north of Mexico (Pohl et al., 2016), three of which have been recorded in North Carolina.The head is ferruginous-brown and the labial palp is light ochreous with dark stripes. The second segment has some fuscous shading exteriorly. The thorax and forewing are ochreous and sometimes strong...The larvae are polyphagous and require hardwoods as hosts. Our records come from wooded residential neighborhoods as well as more natural habitats such as upland hardwood slopes in the mountains. Loca...Larvae feed on a wide range of hardwood trees and shrubs, including maples, birches, hickories, hazelnuts, beech, poplars, willows, basswoods and oaks (Forbes, 1974; Robinson et al., 2010; Marquis et ...The adults are attracted to lights. We need data on host use in North Carolina, and encourage naturalists to search for the larvae and document the larval ecology. ...Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.GNR S4S5Populations are common and appear to be secure in the Piedmont and mountains. The status of Coastal Plain populations is less certain. ...
sciNametaxonomic_commentsid_commentshabitatfoodobservation_methodsstate_protectionNHP_ranksstatus_comments
Psilocorsis cryptolechiella
Black-fringed Leaftier Moth
MONA_number: 956.00
Psilocorsis is a small genus with around 15 described species and several undescribed forms. They range from southeastern Canada to northern South America, but appear to be absent from the West Coast (Hodges, 1974). Seven species occur in North America north of Mexico (Pohl et al., 2016), three of which have been recorded in North Carolina.The following description is primarily based on descriptions in Forbes (1923), Clarke (1941), Hodges (1974). The head and thorax are dark yellowish brown and the labial palp is slender, strongly recur...The larvae are polyphagous and feed on a variety of hardwoods, particularly oaks (Marquis et al., 2019). Many of our records come from wooded residential neighborhoods, and a few are from rich upland ...The larvae are polyphagous and utilized a variety of hardwood trees. The principal host plants are various species of oaks (Hodges, 1974; Marquis et al., 2019), but the larvae also feed to a lesser ex...The adults are attracted to lights. We have little data on the host plants that are used in North Carolina, so we encourage naturalists to search for the leaf-bound nests on oaks, beeches and other h...Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.GNR [S3S5]Too little is currently known about the distribution, habitat associations, and host plant range to make any estimate about this species conservation status in North Carolina. ...
Machimia tentoriferella
Gold-striped Leaftier Moth
MONA_number: 951.00
The following description is primarily based on that of Clarke (1941). The labial palp is pale yellowish white, and the second segment is strongly suffused with blackish fuscous exteriorly on the basa...Populations are dependent on hardwoods as a food source. They occur in a variety of habitats ranging from wooded residential neigborhoods to hardwood and mixed pine-hardwood forests. ...The larvae are highly polyphagous and feed on numerous hardwoods (Baker, 1972; Clarke, 1941; Robinson et al., 2010). The known hosts include dogwoods, birches, ashes, maples, oaks, chestnuts, hickorie...The adults are attracted to lights. ...Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.GNR [S4-S5]This is a common and widespread species that is apparently secure in the state. ...
Scythropiodes issikii
MONA_number: 1066.10
............[GNR] SNAExotic in North Carolina; introduced from East Asia...
Eupragia hospita
MONA_number: 953.00
Eupragia is a genus with four species that are found in northern South America, Central America, and the southern US. Two species occur in the US and only one in the Southeast. The following is based in part on the original description by Hodges (1969) based on three males from Florida. The maxillary palp, frons, and vertex are white. The whitish labial palp is long and recu...The preferred habitats are poorly resolved. Hodges (1969) collected specimens from a near pure stand of Bald Cypress, but it is uncertain if this species is used as a host. ...The hosts are undocumented and in need of study. ...The adults are attracted to lights. ...GNR SUAs of 2020, we have a single record from Jones Co. and it is uncertain whether a local breeding population exists at the site. More data on the distribution and abundance of this species is needed bef...
Semioscopis packardella
Packard's Concealer Moth
MONA_number: 912.00
Semioscopis is a small genus with 13 recognized species, six of which occur in North America. The following is based on the description in Clarke (1941). The labial palp is sordid white and the second segment is overlaid with blackish fuscous exteriorly, except at the base and apex. The third ...The specific habitat requirements are poorly documented. ...The hosts are unknown, but Hodges (1974) surmised that the larvae feed on Crataegus, Prunus, and Sorbus species based on the close similarity of this species to a European species...The adults are attracted to lights....Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.GNR SU. Semioscopis packardella is near the southern limit of its range in western North Carolina and appears to be uncommon in the western mountains. We need additional data on its distribution and a...
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Caloptilia violacella
MONA_number: 644.00
Caloptilia is a large genus with nearly 300 described species; 64 species have been described in North America north of Mexico. The larvae begin as leaf-mining sap-feeders, but the latter instars usually exit the mines and feed within a conical roll that begins at the leaf apex or at the tip of a leaf lobe.The ground color of the head, upper thorax, antenna, and forewing is light bronze brown to pale violet brown. The face is pale yellowish and the labial palps are yellowish white with brown tips. An ex...This species uses a variety of herbaceous legumes as hosts. Many of the host species prefer sunny to partially shaded habitats in disturbed or early successional habitats, but some can tolerate more ...Caloptilia violacella specializes on members of the Phaseoleae clade of legumes. Species of Desmodium appear to be the primary hosts, including D. paniculatum, D. perplexumAdults are attracted to UV lights. Searching for the tentiform mines on host plants is an effective way to document new locality records. ...Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.GNR S4S5This species is found statewide and populations appear to be secure....
Coleophora unidentified species
MONA_number: 1398.01
The genus Coleophora contains a large number of very small moths that have been taxonomically challenging for experts. There are many undescribed species in North America, and dissections of genitalia are required for most species. Jean-Francois Landry, who is an authority on the group, communicated the following to us: "Identifying Coleophora from external aspect is usually unwarranted, save for a few exceptions. Categories like white-winged and brown-streaked may be useful at a general level but not much beyond. Larval cases and host plants are very useful. Genitalia must be examined to recognize the majority of species. Moreover, specific differences are often subtle so high-quality dissections are necessary in which delicate membranous structures are preserved intact. Rearing adults from feeding larval cases, although oftentimes arduous, provides the best source of information. The taxonomy of Nearctic species remains largely unresolved, the number of undescribed species being at least three times that of named ones.” Coleophora species frequently occur at UV-lights and we have numerous records that currently cannot be placed beyond the genus level. Some of these are undoubtedly undescribed species. The larvae produce cases that are often distinctive. When combined with knowledge of the host plant, they often provide the best way to identify native species. ...............
Agonopterix argillacea
MONA_number: 889.00
Agonopterix is a large holarctic genus with more than 125 species, with most occurring in the Palearctic Region. Currently, there are 47 recognized species in North America. Our species are largely confined to the western mountains. The following is primarily based on the description by Clarke (1941) and Hodges (1974). The labial palp, antenna, head, thorax, and forewing is pale grayish ochreous. The second segment of the labial...The habitats that are used in North Carolina are largely unknown. We have only two records for North Carolina as of 2020, with no information of specific habitats. ...The larvae are polyphagous (Robinson et al. 2010, Hodges, 1974), with the known host including willows (Salix spp., including S. lasiolepis and S. bebbiana), Paper Birch (Betul...The adults are attracted to lights. The larval life history is poorly documented, so we encourage individuals to search for larvae on willows or other potential hosts....Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.GNR SUWe currently do not have sufficient information on the distribution and abundance of this species in North Carolina to assess its conservation status. ...
Agonopterix thelmae
Thelma's Agonopterix Moth
MONA_number: 884.00
Agonopterix is a large holarctic genus with more than 125 species, with most occurring in the Palearctic Region. Currently, there are 47 recognized species in North America. Our species are largely confined to the western mountains. The following is based primarily on descriptions in Clarke (1941) and Hodges (1974). The labial palp is whitish ochreous, with the second segment irrorated exteriorly with reddish fuscous. The third s...The hosts and specific habitat requirements are unknown. Many of our records are from wooded, residential neighborhoods. ...The hosts are unknown. Hodges (1974) surmised that this species may use legumes since it is closely related to A. robiniella. ...The adults are attracted to lights....Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.GNR SUWe have only five site records for this species as of 2020, which suggests that it is uncommon in western North Carolina. Additional information is needed on its distribution and abundance before we ...
Agonopterix canadensis
Canadian Agonopterix Moth
MONA_number: 878.00
Agonopterix is a large holarctic genus with more than 125 species, with most occurring in the Palearctic Region. Currently, there are 47 recognized species in North America. Our species are largely confined to the western mountains. The following description is based primarily on Clarke (1941). The labial palp is pale ochreous-white and the second segment is evenly sprinkled with blackish fuscous exteriorly. The third segment ha...The habitats and host plants are poorly documented for eastern populations. Many of our records are from semi-wooded residential neighborhoods and other sites with a mixture of forests and edge habita...This species is polyphagous, but the hosts that are used in the eastern US are poorly documented. Records from Canada (Robinson et al., 2010) include Paper Birch (Betula papyrifera), Balsam Po...The adults are attracted to lights. ...Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.GNR SUPopulations appear to be restricted to the mountains in North Carolina, where they are sometimes locally common. The southern Appalachians appear to be at the southern limit of this species range and ...
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Agonopterix atrodorsella
MONA_number: 864.00
Agonopterix is a large holarctic genus with more than 125 species, with most occurring in the Palearctic Region. Currently, there are 47 recognized species in North America. Our species are largely confined to the western mountains. The following is based on descriptions by Clemens (1863), Clarke (1941) and Hodges (1974). Agonopterix atrodorsella is a distinctive species that has a pale-yellow to yellow-ocherous forewing ...This species uses Sweet-fern and several species of composites that are generally found in open, sunny habitats. Representative habitats include moist ditches and other low-lying areas, and fields, me...Hodges (1974) reported that the adults have been reared from Thoroughworts (Eupatorium spp.,) Tickseeds (Coreopsis spp., including C. tripteris), Devil's Beggar-ticks (Bidens f...The adults are attracted to UV lights. ...Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.GNR SUWe have only three site records as of 2020, which suggests that this species is uncommon within the state. More data are needed on its distribution and abundance before we can assess its conservation...
Caloptilia juglandiella
MONA_number: 610.00
Caloptilia is a large genus with nearly 300 described species; 64 species have been described in North America north of Mexico. The larvae begin as leaf-mining sap-feeders, but the latter instars usually exit the mines and feed within a conical roll that begins at the leaf apex or at the tip of a leaf lobe.Chambers (1872) original description is as follows: Palpi white, flecked with dark brown, and second and third palpal joints tipped with brown. Face white; antennae faintly annulate with whitish, an...Strongly affiliated with Black Walnut, so this species should be expected to occur in streamside habitats and alluvial forests. In the mountains, Black Walnut also occurs at the bases of mesic slopes....Caloptilia juglandiella is only known to feed on Black Walnut (Juglans nigra). ...Given its presumed rarity in North Carolina, This species is perhaps best sought after by searching Black Walnuts for leaflets that are folded on the upper surface, then rearing individuals to adults....Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.GNR SUWe have one historical record for this species in the state and no recent records. ...
Coleophora xyridella
MONA_number: 1396.10
The following is from a detailed description by Landry (2005). The head is white, except for the frons and vertex that are pale buff. The labial palp is also white, except for a pale brown streak tha...The larvae apparently feed on Yellow-eyed Grasses, which are commonly found in Coastal Plain habitats that vary from wet to drier sites. Many of our native species are found at wet sites such as ditc...Landry (2005) found cases attached to the fruiting heads of a Yellow-eyed Grass (Xyris sp.), which is the presumed host. This is the only Coleophora that is known to feed on Xyris......GNR SUWe have recent records from the Sandhills that appear to be northern disjuncts from this otherwise southern coastal species. Additional data are needed on the distribution and abundance of this specie...
Bibarrambla allenella
Bog Bibarrambla Moth
MONA_number: 911.00
Bibarrambla is a monotypic genus. Its sole member (B. allenella) was initially placed in the genus Semioscopis, then moved by Forbes (1923) to Agonopterix. Clarke (1941) later removed it from Agonopterix based on external anatomical and genitalic differences. The following is primarily based on the description by Clarke (1941). The labial palp is sordid white and lacks a brush. The second segment is shaded or speckled with fuscous and has a narrow, incompl...Local populations are associated with hardwood forests or mixed pine-hardwood forests. Our records are mostly from lower to mid-elevations in the mountains, and in habitats that range from floodplai...This species is polyphagous and feeds on a variety of hardwoods. Hodges (1974), Baker (1960), and Robinson et al. (2010) list alders (including Gray Alder, Alnus incana), birches that include ...The adults are attracted to lights. ...Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.GNR SU As of 2020, we have seven site records. This species appears to be locally common, but more information is needed on its distribution and abundance before we can assess its conservation status. ...
Ascalapha odorata
Black Witch Moth
MONA_number: 8649.00
............Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.G5 SNAThis spectacular species occurs in North Carolina only as a stray...