Moths of North Carolina
50 most recent updates
Return Max of 200
sciNametaxonomic_commentsid_commentshabitatfoodobservation_methodsstate_protectionNHP_ranksstatus_comments
Homaledra sabalella
Palm Leaf Skeletonizer Moth
MONA_number: 1422.00
This is a distinctive moth with the head, antenna, thorax, and forewing all uniformly coffee-cream colored to darker grayish tan. The thorax has a tiny black dot at the posterior tip, and the forewing...Our two records for this species come from sites along the coast where Sabal minor occurs but where Sabal palmetto is only present as cultivated specimens. Its presence at our one natural stand of Sab...This species was described by Chambers (1880) from specimens collected from Palmettos. Although Sabal palmetto appears to be the main host, Howard and Abreu (2007) have now documented it on 78 species......Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.GNR S1S3...
Mompha terminella
MONA_number: 1456.00
The genus Mompha consists of around 46 described species in North America. In addition, numerous species remain to be described that are centered in the southwestern US (Bruzzese et al., 2019). The adults are small moths that have two or more tufts of raised scales on each forewing. The larvae either mine leaves, or bore into the stems, flower buds, flowers, or fruits of their hosts. The majority of species feed on members of the Onagraceae, but others feed on species in the Cistaceae, Lythraceae, Melastomataceae, and Rubiaceae.The following is primarily based on the description in Forbes (1923). The head and thorax are lead-colored to dark brown, while the antenna is dark brown with a whitish tip. The forewing has rather co...Broadleaf Enchanter's-nightshade is the most important host in North Carolina. This species is found in mesic, nutrient-rich hardwood forests, including in bottomland hardwood forests, cove forests, a...The two known hosts are Small Enchanter's-nightshade (Circaea alpina) and Broadleaf Enchanter's-nightshade (Circaea canadensis). ...The adults occasionally visit lights and are sometimes seen resting on vegetation during the day. The conspicuous blotch mines are easy to spot on the leaves of Enchanter's-nightshade....Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.GNR [SU]This species is at the southern limit of its range in western North Carolina, where it is seemingly uncommon....
Mompha stellella
MONA_number: 1455.00
The genus Mompha consists of around 46 described species in North America. In addition, numerous species remain to be described that are centered in the southwestern US (Bruzzese et al., 2019). The adults are small moths that have two or more tufts of raised scales on each forewing. The larvae either mine leaves, or bore into the stems, flower buds, flowers, or fruits of their hosts. The majority of species feed on members of the Onagraceae, but others feed on species in the Cistaceae, Lythraceae, Melastomataceae, and Rubiaceae.The following description is based primarily on the original description by Busck (1906). The antenna is uniformly dark brown. The labial palp is whitish ocherous with scattered black scales, and have...Mompha stellella appears to be monophagous on Common Evening-primrose (Oenothera biennis), which is an early successional species that exploits open, disturbed habitats. Typical habitat...Common Evening-primrose (Oenothera biennis) is the only known host. ...The adults are attracted to lights. We recommend searching for the distorted flowers on Evening-primroses and rearing the adults. ...GNR SUThis species was only recently documented in the state and may be more common than previously thought based on our recent success in locating populations based on the presence of distorted Oenother...
Mompha murtfeldtella
MONA_number: 1448.00
The genus Mompha consists of around 46 described species in North America. In addition, numerous species remain to be described that are centered in the southwestern US (Bruzzese et al., 2019). The adults are small moths that have two or more tufts of raised scales on each forewing. The larvae either mine leaves, or bore into the stems, flower buds, flowers, or fruits of their hosts. The majority of species feed on members of the Onagraceae, but others feed on species in the Cistaceae, Lythraceae, Melastomataceae, and Rubiaceae.The following is based in part on the description by Chambers (1875b). The head and thorax are silvery white and the antenna brown. The labial palp is silvery white, with the second joint brown on the...The larvae feed on evening-primroses, but the specific hosts and habitat requirements in North Carolina are undocumented. ...Murtfeldt (as cited in Chambers, 1879) noted that the larvae feed on both cultivated and wild species of Oenothera, particularly Missouri Evening-primrose (O. macrocarpa). This species d...The adults occasionally visit lights. We also recommend inspecting the flowers and developing buds of native Oenothera species and rearing the adults in order to better document host use within...Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.GNR [SU]As of 2021, we have only two site records for North Carolina. We are uncertain if this represents true rarity, or undercollecting. ...
Mompha cephalonthiella
Buttonbush Leafminer Moth
MONA_number: 1433.00
The genus Mompha consists of around 46 described species in North America. In addition, numerous species remain to be described that are centered in the southwestern US (Bruzzese et al., 2019). The adults are small moths that have two or more tufts of raised scales on each forewing. The larvae either mine leaves, or bore into the stems, flower buds, flowers, or fruits of their hosts. The majority of species feed on members of the Onagraceae, but others feed on species in the Cistaceae, Lythraceae, Melastomataceae, and Rubiaceae.The following description is based on accounts by Chambers (1871) and Wagner et al. (2004). The frons is shiny white and the labial palp grayish above. The antenna is annulated with pale and dark brow...Local populations are only found in association with Buttonbush, which is a wetland species that is found in sunny to partially shaded wetlands. Typical habitats include pond and lake margins, marshes...This species only feeds on Buttonbush (Cephalanthus occidentalis)....The adults appear to rarely visit lights and are best obtained by rearing them from leaf mines. ...GNR SUWe currently do not have sufficient information on the distribution and abundance of this species in North Carolina to accurately assess is conservation status. ...
sciNametaxonomic_commentsid_commentshabitatfoodobservation_methodsstate_protectionNHP_ranksstatus_comments
Mompha brevivittella
MONA_number: 1430.00
The genus Mompha consists of around 46 described species in North America. In addition, numerous species remain to be described that are centered in the southwestern US (Bruzzese et al., 2019). The adults are small moths that have two or more tufts of raised scales on each forewing. The larvae either mine leaves, or bore into the stems, flower buds, flowers, or fruits of their hosts. The majority of species feed on members of the Onagraceae, but others feed on species in the Cistaceae, Lythraceae, Melastomataceae, and Rubiaceae.This is a small moth with an overall brownish wash, and three short, longitudinal dark streaks. The detailed description that follows is based on the descriptions by Clemens (1864) and Forbes (1923). ...Local populations depend on evening-primroses as hosts, particularly Common Evening-primrose. This species is common in open, sunny habitats such as roadsides, powerline corridors, old fields, and wo...This species uses Common Evening-primrose (Oenothera biennis) as its primary host, and presumably other Oenothera species. ...The adults are attracted to lights, and the larvae are often common in the developing fruits of the hosts. We recommending searching for the larvae in hosts and rearing the adults in order to better d...Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.GNR [SU]As of 2021, we have only two site records. This species is presumably more common than our records suggest. ...
Mompha bottimeri
Bottimer's Mompha Moth
MONA_number: 1429.00
This is a rather distinctive species, with a pure white basal half of the wing that contrasts sharply with fawn-brown markings on the posterior half. The following detailed description is based on tha...The larvae feed on frostweeds. The two known hosts are found in sandy soils and dry habitats. They can be found in openings in maritime forests, and in pine forest habitats such as dry pine flatwoods ...This species is a specialist on frostweeds (Crocamthemum spp.), where it exploits the seed pods (Busck, 1940; Bottimer, 1942). The known hosts include Coastal Sand Frostweed (C. arenicolaThe adults are attracted to lights and have been reared from Crocamthemum. ...GNR [S1S2]As of 2021, we have only one record for the state. This species is likely rare due to the fact that its known host plants are also rare in North Carolina. ...
Mompha argentimaculella
MONA_number: 1426.00
The genus Mompha consists of around 46 described species in North America. In addition, numerous species remain to be described that are centered in the southwestern US (Bruzzese et al., 2019). The adults are small moths that have two or more tufts of raised scales on each forewing. The larvae either mine leaves, or bore into the stems, flower buds, flowers, or fruits of their hosts. The majority of species feed on members of the Onagraceae, but others feed on species in the Cistaceae, Lythraceae, Melastomataceae, and Rubiaceae.Mompha argentimaculella is variable in coloration and patterning, in part due to bluish iridescence that may or may not be seen depending on the light angle. The following description is based ...Local populations are dependent on evening-primroses and their relatives. The known hosts are often found in open, sunny or partially shaded habitats such as forest openings, rock outcrops, roadsides,...The documented hosts are all species of Oenothera, including Common Evening-primrose (O. biennis), Narrowleaf Sundrops (O. fruticosa), Biennial Beeblossom (O. gaura), and P...The adults appear to only rarely visit lights and all of our records are based on leaf mines and reared adults. We recommend searching for occupied leaf mines on Oenothera and rearing the adult...GNR [SU]We have only four site records as of 2021, but this species has undoubtedly been undercollected within the state. ...
Mompha annulata
MONA_number: 1425.00
The genus Mompha consists of around 46 described species in North America. In addition, numerous species remain to be described that are centered in the southwestern US (Bruzzese et al., 2019). The adults are small moths that have two or more tufts of raised scales on each forewing. The larvae either mine leaves, or bore into the stems, flower buds, flowers, or fruits of their hosts. The majority of species feed on members of the Onagraceae, but others feed on species in the Cistaceae, Lythraceae, Melastomataceae, and Rubiaceae. Braun (1923) described Mompha annulata based on two specimens that she collected in Ohio. The following is based on her description. The labial palp is silvery white inwardly and fuscous outwa...Houstonia purpurea is the only known host species. This species is common in the Piedmont and mountains where it occurs in dry to moist forests, as well as a variety of disturbed habitats such ...Larvae have been found feeding on Houstonia purpurea in North Carolina. The leaf mines found by Tracy Feldman in 2018 appear to represent the first known host plant record for this species....Attempts should be made to locate leaf mines on Houstonia purpurea during the summer months. ...[GNR] SUMompha annulata appears to be rare in the eastern US based on the scarcity of records on MPG, BugGuide, BAMONA, and BOLD. Although we currently have only one record for North Carolina, more in...
Mompha passerella
MONA_number: 1450.00
The genus Mompha consists of around 46 described species in North America. In addition, numerous species remain to be described that are centered in the southwestern US (Bruzzese et al., 2019). The adults are small moths that have two or more tufts of raised scales on each forewing. The larvae either mine leaves, or bore into the stems, flower buds, flowers, or fruits of their hosts. The majority of species feed on members of the Onagraceae, but others feed on species in the Cistaceae, Lythraceae, Melastomataceae, and Rubiaceae.The following description is primarily based on that of Busck (1909a) and Forbes (1923). The labial palp is long, recurved, and white with a gray spot or ill-defined brown annulation at the end of th...The larvae feed on frostweeds and pinweeds, which are members of the Cistaceae. These are commonly found in relatively dry, sandy, open habitats. The only documented host in North Carolina is Hairy Pi...The known hosts include species of Crocanthemum and Lechea. Hairy Pinweed (Lechea mucronata) is the only documented host within the state, but other species in the Cistaceae are ...The adults occasionally visit lights. We recommend searching for the leaf mines and rearing adults to better document host use in North Carolina. ...GNR [SU]As of 2021, we have only five site records. We are uncertain if the paucity of records reflects true rarity or the undercollecting of specimens. ...
sciNametaxonomic_commentsid_commentshabitatfoodobservation_methodsstate_protectionNHP_ranksstatus_comments
Mompha eloisella
Red-streaked Mompha Moth
MONA_number: 1443.00
The genus Mompha consists of around 46 described species in North America. In addition, numerous species remain to be described that are centered in the southwestern US (Bruzzese et al., 2019). The adults are small moths that have two or more tufts of raised scales on each forewing. The larvae either mine leaves, or bore into the stems, flower buds, flowers, or fruits of their hosts. The majority of species feed on members of the Onagraceae, but others feed on species in the Cistaceae, Lythraceae, Melastomataceae, and Rubiaceae.This is an easily recognizable species that has bold black spotting on the distal half of an otherwise silvery white body, tawny coloration and streaking on the apical third, and a black, tail-like st...Common Evening-primrose is presumed to be the primary host in North Carolina. This species is found in sunny to partially sunny habitats such as infrequently mowed roadsides, abandoned fields, powerli...The two known hosts are Common Evening-primrose (Oenothera biennis) and Bigfruit Evening-primrose (O. macrocarpa). ...The adults are attracted to lights. The larvae can be found in the overwintering stalks of evening-primroses, and the adults easily reared from the overwintering stalks. ...Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.GNR [SU]As of 2021, we have only a few scattered records from across the state. This species is probably more common than our records suggests. ...
Mompha circumscriptella
Circumscript Mompha Moth
MONA_number: 1434.00
The genus Mompha consists of around 46 described species in North America. In addition, numerous species remain to be described that are centered in the southwestern US (Bruzzese et al., 2019). The adults are small moths that have two or more tufts of raised scales on each forewing. The larvae either mine leaves, or bore into the stems, flower buds, flowers, or fruits of their hosts. The majority of species feed on members of the Onagraceae, but others feed on species in the Cistaceae, Lythraceae, Melastomataceae, and Rubiaceae.This is a very small moth that has a distinctive white hourglass-like mark when a resting moth is viewed from above with its wings closed. The following detailed description is based primarily on that...The larvae feed on evening-primroses, particularly species that occur in sunny or partially sunny sites. Typical habitats include roadsides, old fields and meadows, powerline corridors, and the edges ...The larvae use Evening-primroses (Oethothera spp.) as hosts, including Common Evening-primrose (O. biennis) and Cutleaf Evening-primrose (O. laciniata). ...We recommend rearing adults from Oethothera fruits. The fruits do not show any externally-visible signs of infestation or damage, so the best strategy is to collect and cage entire clusters of ...Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.GNR [SU]This species is probably more common that our records suggest given that the adults are generally inactive except during the breeding season and many records are based on rearing the adults from seed ...
Coleotechnites macleodi
Brown Hemlock Needleminer
MONA_number: 1819.00
The following is based mostly on the original description by Freeman (1965). The antenna is alternately marked with ocherous and brown bands. The labial palp is light ocherous, and the second joint h...This species has only been observed feeding on Eastern Hemlock, which is most commonly found in cool, moist forested sites. ...Eastern Hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) is the only known host, but Carolina Hemlock (Tsuga caroliniana) could potentially be a host for southern Appalachian populations. ...We recommend searching for the webbed leaves during winter and spring. The color of the caterpillars should be checked to verify that they are brown with dark brown heads and thoracic shields. Col...GNR S2S3This species was only recently discovered in North Carolina, and more information is needed on its distribution and abundance before we can assess its conservation status. This and other species that ...
Eriocraniella mediabulla
MONA_number: 13.10
Eriocraniella is a genus of primitive moths with eight described Nearctic species that specialize on oaks. Eriocraniella mediabulla is a small moth with shiny black to dark fuscous wings. The forewings are uniformly black with a distinct golden to sometimes bluish luster. The hindwings are slightly ...Populations are found in coastal hardwood forests with oaks. Populations in Florida appear to rely primary on Quercus nigra, which is associated with bottomland forests. One of our NC records i...Eriocraniella mediabulla has been reared from Water Oak (Quercus nigra), and the mines have been found on Sand Laurel Oak (Q. hemisphaerica), Southern Red Oak (Q. falcata),...This species appears to be at the northern edge of its range in North Carolina. Searching for active mines may be the best way to document populations, but rearing is challenging since the adults req...GNR S2S4Eriocraniella mediabulla was previously known to occur no further north than Florida and Georgia, which suggest that our North Carolina populations may be disjunct from the main range to the so...
Dyseriocrania griseocapitella
Chinquapin Leaf-miner Moth
MONA_number: 3.00
Dyseriocrania is a small genus of primitive moths. There are only two recognized species in North America, and only one in North Carolina. The following description of the adults is based on the comprehensive revision of the superfamily Eriocranioidea by Davis (1978). The face, upper head, and thorax are covered with long, predominantly ...Populations are found in a wide variety of habitats with oaks and chestnuts. ...Larvae are rather generalized leaf-miners on members of the Fagaceae. The known hosts include American Chestnut (Castanea dentata), Chinese Chestnut (C. mollissima), Chinkapin (C. pum...The adults are attracted to UV-lights. Populations can also be documented by locating the mines on expanding, tender leaves. The oviposition site often forms a hole as the leaf expands, and the frass ...Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.GNR S2S4...
sciNametaxonomic_commentsid_commentshabitatfoodobservation_methodsstate_protectionNHP_ranksstatus_comments
Argyresthia apicimaculella
MONA_number: 2438.00
...............
Bucculatrix unidentified species
MONA_number: 582.11
Bucculatrix is a large genus of small leaf-mining moths, with around 300 species worldwide. A total of 103 Nearctic species have been described, and many others will likely be described in the future. Braun (1963) covered 99 species in her monograph, and four additional Nearctic species have been described since then. We have several forms from North Carolina that are difficult to assign to currently recognized species. ...............
Bucculatrix pomifoliella
MONA_number: 577.00
Bucculatrix is a large genus of small leaf-mining moths, with around 300 species worldwide. A total of 103 Nearctic species have been described, and many others will likely be described in the future. Braun (1963) covered 99 species in her monograph, and four additional Nearctic species have been described since then. This is a minute brownish white moth with a dark oval patch on the dorsal surface of the forewings when held at rest. The ground color of the forewing, the head, and thorax is white and dusted with br...The habitats are rather poorly documented in North Carolina, but include an old apple orchard and a high elevation forest. Given the large number of hosts, this species undoubtedly occurs in a wide ra...Larvae are polyphagous and feed on a variety of trees and shrubs in the Rosaceae. The known hosts include species of Amelanchier, Chaenomeles, Crataegus, Cydonia, Malus<...The adults occasionally visit lights and the mines are easy to identify on Black Cherry, apples, and other rosaceous species. ...Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.GNR [SU]As of 2021, we have only a few records for this species. This minute species is easily overlooked, and is probably more widespread and common than our records suggest....
Bucculatrix ainsliella
Oak Skeletonizer Moth
MONA_number: 572.00
Bucculatrix is a large genus of small leaf-mining moths, with around 300 species worldwide. A total of 103 Nearctic species have been described, and many others will likely be described in the future. Braun (1963) covered 99 species in her monograph, and four additional Nearctic species have been described since then. This is a minute whitish but heavily dusted moth with a well-defined oval patch of dark brown scales that is visible on the dorsal surface when the wings are closed. The following detailed description...Local populations are generally associated with habitats with upland oaks, particularly Northern Red Oak. Many of our records are from intermediate to higher elevations in the mountains where this spe...The larvae specialize on oaks and perhaps American Chestnut (Braun, 1963; Eiseman, 2019). They appear to be stenophagous, feeding primarily on Northern Red Oak (Quercus rubra) and to a lesser ...The adults occasionally visit lights, and the mines and coccons are often readily evident on Northern Red Oak and perhaps other hosts. ...Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.GNR [SU]As of 2021, we have only a few records of this species in North Carolina. Given its host plant preferences, it may turn out to be fairly common in the Blue Ridge. ...
Bucculatrix locuples
MONA_number: 571.00
Bucculatrix is a large genus of small leaf-mining moths, with around 300 species worldwide. A total of 103 Nearctic species have been described, and many others will likely be described in the future. Braun (1963) covered 99 species in her monograph, and four additional Nearctic species have been described since then. This is a tiny black moth with a conspicuous dark head tuft, along with two costal and two dorsal spots. The following detailed description is based on that of Braun (1963). The face is lustrous pale ...The larvae are specialists on alders, and presumably only use Hazel Alder in North Carolina. This species is a wetlands species that can be found is a variety of wet settings, particularly where there...The known hosts are the introduced Gray Alder (Alnus incana) farther north, and our native Hazel Alder (A. serrulata). The latter is the presumed host in North Carolina, and our only lar...The adults appear to only very rarely visit lights and most records are for leaf mines or adults reared from mines. We recommend searching alders for the mines during the summer and fall months. ...GNR SUAs of 2021, we have only two site records. Additional information is needed on the distribution and abundance of this species within the state before we can assess its conservation status. ...
sciNametaxonomic_commentsid_commentshabitatfoodobservation_methodsstate_protectionNHP_ranksstatus_comments
Bucculatrix recognita
MONA_number: 564.00
Bucculatrix is a large genus of small leaf-mining moths, with around 300 species worldwide. A total of 103 Nearctic species have been described, and many others will likely be described in the future. Braun (1963) covered 99 species in her monograph, and four additional Nearctic species have been described since then. This is a minute yellowish-brown moth. The head is cream white, with a dorsal tuft that is variably shaded with brown or ocher. The following detailed description is from Braun (1963). The eye-cap is ...Braun (1963) did not describe the habitat where she collected North Carolina specimens, but Montane Oak-Hickory Forest seems likely, with White Oak the most likely host plant....The hosts are poorly documented. Larvae use Bur Oak (Quercus macrocarpa) in Canada, and presumably use other members of the White Oak group such as White Oak (Q. alba) or Chestnut Oak (<...The adults are attracted to lights. ...Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.GNR [SH]This species is known in North Carolina only from historic records from a single site. Its suspected host plants, however, are common and widespread, and the same may eventually be found to be true fo...
Bucculatrix luteella
MONA_number: 563.00
Bucculatrix is a large genus of small leaf-mining moths, with around 300 species worldwide. A total of 103 Nearctic species have been described, and many others will likely be described in the future. Braun (1963) covered 99 species in her monograph, and four additional Nearctic species have been described since then. The head is white, and the tuft white with a few yellow hairs in darker specimens. The eyecap is white, and the antennal stalk white with distinct brown annulations (pale females often have very obscu...The hosts are poorly documented, with White Oak being the only definitive host. This common and widely distributed species is found in mesic to somewhat drier conditions, particularly in the Piedmont ...This is an oak specialist. The only documented host is White Oak (Quercus alba), but other members of the white oak group are likely used. ...The adults appear to rarely visit lights. ...Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.GNR SUThere are very few records for this species in the eastern US, and only two site records for North Carolina. It is uncertain if this reflects the fact that adults are not attracted to lights, or true ...
Bucculatrix canadensisella
Birch Skeletonizer Moth
MONA_number: 560.00
Bucculatrix is a large genus of small leaf-mining moths, with around 300 species worldwide. A total of 103 Nearctic species have been described, and many others will likely be described in the future. Braun (1963) covered 99 species in her monograph, and four additional Nearctic species have been described since then. This is a minute, dark brown and white streaked moth. The following description is based on that by Braun (1963). An even more detailed description is in Friend (1927). The face is whitish to grayish ...Records from North Carolina, as well as records from Tennessee and Kentucky, come from elevations above 4,000 ft. The host plants in those areas were Yellow Birch in stands of northern hardwoods (Shaf...The larvae specialize on birches (Braun, 1963; Eiseman, 2019). The known hosts include European white birch (Betula pubescens), Yellow Birch (Betula alleghaniensis), Sweet Birch (B. l...The adults are attracted to lights. Friend (1927) noted that the adults often rest on ground vegetation such as ferns during the day and can be easily collected by sweep-netting. They make daily migra...Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.GNR [SU]Based on the few records collected so far, this species appears to be associated with high elevation stands of Northern Hardwoods, where it may be one of a number of Pleistocene relicts that persist i...
Bucculatrix coronatella
MONA_number: 559.00
Bucculatrix is a large genus of small leaf-mining moths, with around 300 species worldwide. A total of 103 Nearctic species have been described, and many others will likely be described in the future. Braun (1963) covered 99 species in her monograph, and four additional Nearctic species have been described since then. This is a tiny moth with three costal streaks and one tornal streak, a black raised scale patch, a black apical spot, and a black apical ciliary line. The following detailed description is based on Br...This species appears to rely heavily on River Birch, and at least two of our records come from river and lake shorelines in the Piedmont and Coastal Plain where River Birch is common. ...Larvae are leafminers on River Birch (Betula nigra), although other birches may be possible hosts (Braun, 1963)....All of our records come from lights. We recommend searching for leaf mines on River Birch and other birches to better document host use in North Carolina. ...Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.GNR S4S5This small moth that is easily overlooked. It appears to be both common and widespread based on the number of state records, its host plants, and habitat associations. ...
Bucculatrix quinquenotella
MONA_number: 555.00
Bucculatrix is a large genus of small leaf-mining moths, with around 300 species worldwide. A total of 103 Nearctic species have been described, and many others will likely be described in the future. Braun (1963) covered 99 species in her monograph, and four additional Nearctic species have been described since then. This is a tiny moth with an ocherous forewing that has three costal and two dorsal silvery spots. The silvery spots are usually broad and brilliantly lustrous. The following detailed description is fr...The habitats are poorly documented. The only documented host is Northern Red Oak, which is commonly found in rich hardwood forests at mesic to somewhat drier sites. ...Northern Red Oak (Quercus rubra) is the only documented host. ...The adults regularly visit lights. ...Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.GNR [SH]We only have historical records from Highlands from 1958. ...
sciNametaxonomic_commentsid_commentshabitatfoodobservation_methodsstate_protectionNHP_ranksstatus_comments
Bucculatrix sexnotata
MONA_number: 529.00
Bucculatrix is a large genus of small leaf-mining moths, with around 300 species worldwide. A total of 103 Nearctic species have been described, and many others will likely be described in the future. Braun (1963) covered 99 species in her monograph, and four additional Nearctic species have been described since then. This is a tiny, dark brown to blackish moth with oblique, silvery streaks. The head has an orange-red to dark brown tuft. The following description is from Braun (1963). The face is shining yellowish ...Leaf mines of this species were abundant along a high ridge in the Great Smoky Mountains between 5,000 and 6,000 ft where they fed solely on E. divaricata (Braun, 1963). This host species is fa...The larvae feed on several species of asters (Eurybia; Symphyotrichum). The documented hosts include White Wood-aster (E. divaricata), Heartleaf Aster (S. cordifolium) New ...The adults rarely visit lights, and many records are based on leaf mines or adults that were reared from mines. We recommend searching the undersides of leaves of E. divaricata or other fall as...Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.GNR [SH]This species has not been recorded in North Carolina since 1953. There is a possibility that this species is a rare northern disjunct, but the distribution of its host plant suggests that it could be ...
Bucculatrix eupatoriella
MONA_number: 525.00
Bucculatrix is a large genus of small leaf-mining moths, with around 300 species worldwide. A total of 103 Nearctic species have been described, and many others will likely be described in the future. Braun (1963) covered 99 species in her monograph, and four additional Nearctic species have been described since then. This is a minute brown and silver moth with a reddish brown tuft on its head. The following description is based on that of Braun (1963). The face is yellow and the tuft light reddish brown. The eye-...The larvae feed on Eupatorium perfoliatum (Braun, 1963). This species is associated with wet habitats, including marshes, swamps, bogs, and wet pastures (Weakley, 2015). It is found widely thro...The only known host is Common Boneset (Eupatorium perfoliatum). ...The adults appear to rarely visit lights. We recommend searching Common Boneset for larvae during the summer months and rearing the adults....Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.GNR [SH]This species is known in North Carolina only from a single, historic record. Its known host plant, however, is common and widespread in wetlands, and the same may eventually be found to be true for th...
Bucculatrix staintonella
MONA_number: 513.00
Bucculatrix is a large genus of small leaf-mining moths, with around 300 species worldwide. A total of 103 Nearctic species have been described, and many others will likely be described in the future. Braun (1963) covered 99 species in her monograph, and four additional Nearctic species have been described since then. This species is variable in coloration and patterning. The following description is based from Braun (1963). The face and head are white, while the tuft is typically white, but usually with ocherous ...The preferred habitats are poorly delineated. Our two records from Scotland County are from Yellow Sneezeweed, which is typically found in open, sunny habitats such as roadsides, heavily grazed pastu... The documented hosts include species of aster (Symphyotrichum), including Heartleaf Aster (S. cordifolium), and Yellow Sneezeweed (Helenium amarum). ...Adults occasionally visit lights. We also recommend searching for the leaf mines and rearing the adults to better document the habitat requirements and host use in North Carolina. ...GNR [SU]As of 2021, we have only two records for the state. This species has likely been widely overlooked within the state and additional information is needed on its distribution and abundance before we has...
Bucculatrix cuneigera
MONA_number: 499.00
Bucculatrix is a large genus of small leaf-mining moths, with around 300 species worldwide. A total of 103 Nearctic species have been described, and many others will likely be described in the future. Braun (1963) covered 99 species in her monograph, and four additional Nearctic species have been described since then. This is a minute black and white moth. The face and thorax are white and the tuft on top of the head is either entirely white or with a variably brown center. The ground color of the forewing is dark ...The preferred habitats are poorly defined. This species commonly uses Short's Aster farther north, which is found in mesic to upland forests, rocky open woodlands and slopes, and woodland borders. Ha...This species specializes on asters (Symphyotrichum spp.). Short's Aster (S. shortii) was used at Braun's (1963) study sites in Ohio, but other Symphyotrichum species are likely us...The adults are attracted to lights, and the larval mines are often conspicuous in the autumn. ...Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.GNR [SU]We currently have very few records for this primarily northern species in North Carolina. More information is needed on its distribution, host plants, and habitat associations here in this state befor...
Bucculatrix inusitata
MONA_number: 496.00
Bucculatrix is a large genus of small leaf-mining moths, with around 300 species worldwide. A total of 103 Nearctic species have been described, and many others will likely be described in the future. Braun (1963) covered 99 species in her monograph, and four additional Nearctic species have been described since then. Braun's (1963) monograph on North American species of Bucculatrix remains the authoritative work on this group. The following is based on her study of specimens from throughout the range of thi...The hosts are unknown and the habitat requirements are undocumented. ...There is one record of this species being raised from Juniperus communis based on a museum label, but Braun (1963) questioned the validity of this since this species belongs to a group of Bu...The adults appear to rarely visit lights. ...GNR SUAs of 2021 we currently have only one record for the state. Additional data are needed on the distribution and abundance of this species before we can assess its conservation status. ...
sciNametaxonomic_commentsid_commentshabitatfoodobservation_methodsstate_protectionNHP_ranksstatus_comments
Bucculatrix montana
MONA_number: 486.00
Bucculatrix is a large genus of small leaf-mining moths, with around 300 species worldwide. A total of 103 Nearctic species have been described, and many others will likely be described in the future. Braun (1963) covered 99 species in her monograph, and four additional Nearctic species have been described since then. This is a small white moth (large for the genus) with ocherous, tan, or sometimes dark brown streaks. The following description is based on Braun (1963). The head is white, with a few fuscous hairs in...The North Carolina record comes from a stand of Northern Hardwoods. ...The hosts appear to be undocumented. Beadle and Leckie (2012) state that Sweet Gale (Myrica gale) is used, but we are unaware of the source for this statement. Sweet Gale is an extreme disjunc...The adults are attracted to lights. ...Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.GNR [SU]This species is poorly known in general, without any information on its host plants or habitats. It appears to be scarce in the Southeast, and we have just a single record as of 2021. Far more needs t...
Parornix unidentified species
MONA_number: 686.01
The genus Parornix contains around 70 species of small moths that are mostly found in north temperate regions. They are well represented in North America, but many are difficult to distinguish on external morphology and require the examination of genitalia. The last major taxonomic treatment was by Dietz (1907). There are several undescribed species that are known, and a modern taxonomic treatment is needed. We have several records and images of Parornix species in North Carolina that are difficult to place. ...............
Parornix vicinella
MONA_number: 686.00
The genus Parornix contains around 70 species of small moths that are mostly found in north temperate regions. They are well represented in North America, but many are difficult to distinguish on external morphology and require the examination of genitalia. The last major taxonomic treatment was by Dietz (1907). There are several undescribed species that are known, and a modern taxonomic treatment is needed. The following description is based in part on those of Dietz (1907) and Forbes (1923). The head is rough-haired, with the hairs more or less appressed on the face. There are two large tufts on the ver...This species is only known to feed on Yellow Birch (Robinson et al., 2010), which is found in mesic hardwood forests at higher elevations in the mountains. We have one low elevation site in the mounta...Based on a very small number of observations, the only known host is Yellow Birch (Betula alleghaniensis). ...The adults appear to occasionally visit lights. We recommend searching for the mines on Yellow Birch or other birches in the mountains to better document the larval ecology and habitat use. ...Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.GNR [SU]This is a seemingly rare species with only two documented records as of 2021. ...
Parornix preciosella
MONA_number: 680.00
The genus Parornix contains around 70 species of small moths that are mostly found in north temperate regions. They are well represented in North America, but many are difficult to distinguish on external morphology and require the examination of genitalia. The last major taxonomic treatment was by Dietz (1907). There are several undescribed species that are known, and a modern taxonomic treatment is needed. This is a distinctively marked Parornix with five costal streaks and three dorsal streaks on a dark brown ground. The following detailed description is based on that of Dietz (1907). The labia...The preferred habitats are poorly documented. Blueberries appear to be the primary hosts in North Carolina. They can be found in a variety of habitats within the state, ranging from bogs, swamps, and ...The hosts include both blueberries (Vaccinium) and Choke Cherry (Prunus virginiana). The specific hosts include Lowbush Blueberry (V. angustifolium) and Northern Highbush Blueberr...The adults are attracted to lights. We have much to learn about the larval ecology, and recommend searching for mines on blueberries or other hosts and rearing the adults. ...GNR [SU]This species appears to be at the southern limit of its range and uncommon in the state, with only two records as of 2021. Additional information is needed on its distribution and abundance before we...
Helvibotys unidentified species
MONA_number: 4984.01
............
sciNametaxonomic_commentsid_commentshabitatfoodobservation_methodsstate_protectionNHP_ranksstatus_comments
Parornix geminatella
Unspotted Tentiform Leafminer Moth
MONA_number: 673.00
The genus Parornix contains around 70 species of small moths that are mostly found in north temperate regions. They are well represented in North America, but many are difficult to distinguish on external morphology and require the examination of genitalia. The last major taxonomic treatment was by Dietz (1907). There are several undescribed species that are known, and a modern taxonomic treatment is needed. The following description is based on those of Dietz (1907) and Forbes (1923). The head is rough-haired, with the hairs more or less appressed on the face. There are two large tufts on the vertex that...The larvae are polyphagous on members of the rose family and feed on both commercial species (apples; pears) and on native species. They occupy a variety of habitats, including hardwood forests, fores...Larvae feed on members of the Rosaceae. Eiseman (2019) lists species of Crataegus, Cydonia, Malus, Prunus, Pyrus and probably Amelanchier. As of 2021, our on...The adults appear to only rarely visit lights. We recommending rearing adults from leaf mines. ...Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.GNR SU...
Coleotechnites apicitripunctella
Green Hemlock Needleminer
MONA_number: 1789.00
The following description is based on the original description by Clemens (1860b). The head, face and thorax are ocherous. The labial palp is ocherous internally and dark fuscous externally. The term...This species is a specialist on Eastern Hemlock, which is most commonly found in cool, moist ravines and similar forested sites....Eastern Hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) is the only known host, but Carolina Hemlock (Tsuga caroliniana) could potentially be a host for southern Appalachian populations. ...We recommend searching for the webbed leaves during winter and spring. The color of the caterpillars should be checked to verify that they are green with dark heads and prothoracic shields. Coleote...GNR S2S3This species was only recently discovered in North Carolina, and more information is needed on its distribution and abundance before we can assess its conservation status. This and other species that ...
Bucculatrix angustata
MONA_number: 522.00
Bucculatrix is a large genus of small leaf-mining moths, with around 300 species worldwide. A total of 103 Nearctic species have been described, and many others will likely be described in the future. Braun (1963) covered 99 species in her monograph, and four additional Nearctic species have been described since then. This is a very small moth with a distinctive white patterning on a darker background. The following description is based on the description by Braun (1963). The face is white and the tuft whitish with...The habitats that are preferred are poorly documented. Based on host plants, they probably include open woods and woodland edges, as well as more open, sunny sites such as old fields and roadways....The larvae use members of at least three genera of composites, including Asters (Symphyotrichum), Goldenrods (Solidago), and Fleabanes (Erigeron). Asters appear to be the most imp...The adults come to blacklights but we do not have enough information to estimate how often. We recommend searching for leaf mines and rearing adults to better document host use and preferred habitat...Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.GNR [SU]This species may turn out to be widespread in the western half of the state, but we currently do not have enough information to estimate its conservation status....
Bucculatrix ivella
MONA_number: 517.00
Bucculatrix is a large genus of small leaf-mining moths, with around 300 species worldwide. A total of 103 Nearctic species have been described, and many others will likely be described in the future. Braun (1963) covered 99 species in her monograph, and four additional Nearctic species have been described since then. Braun's (1963) monograph on North American species of Bucculatrix remains the authoritative work on this group. The following is based on her description from studies of 78 specimens from throu...This species is strongly associated with Baccharis halimifolia, which occurs in fresh and brackish marshes, marsh borders, hammocks, moist abused land, roadsides, ditches, old fields, and a wi...Palmer and Diatloff (1987) conducted extensive surveys for Bucculatrix ivella and found that it relies almost entirely on (Baccharis halimifolia) as a host plant. Known secondary hosts ...This species is best documented in North Carolina by searching for leaf mines or cocoons on Baccharis halimifolia or B. glomeruliflora. The adults have been successfully reared from pupa...GNR [SU]As of 2021 we have only three records. This species has likely been widely overlooked within the state, and more data are needed on its distribution and abundance before we can assess its conservation...
Aethalura intertexta
Four-Barred Gray Moth
MONA_number: 6570.00
......Larvae feed on Alder and Birch (Wagner et al., 2002)......Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.G5 S4S5...
sciNametaxonomic_commentsid_commentshabitatfoodobservation_methodsstate_protectionNHP_ranksstatus_comments
Cepphis armataria
Scallop Moth
MONA_number: 6835.00
...Forests, woodlands, and wooded swamps (Wagner et al., 2001). Most of our records come from high elevation hardwoods, cove forests, and montane riparian forests....Polyphagous, with larvae feeding on many species of hardwood trees and shrubs (Wagner et al., 2001).......Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.G5 S4...
Eugonobapta nivosaria
Snowy Geometer Moth
MONA_number: 6965.00
...Forests and woodlands (Wagner et al., 2001). Our records come from cove forests, high elevation forests, bogs, and montane riparian habitats....Broadly polyphagous. Larvae feed on many hardwood trees and shrubs, including cherry and dogwood, as well as forbs such as Blue Cohosh, Meadow Rue, and Sweet Cicley (Wagner et al., 2001)......Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.G5 S3S4...
Cydia rana
MONA_number: 3450.00
......Larvae feed on Spruce (Picea sp.) (Brown et al., 2008). Records for this species also come from areas far outside the range of Spruce (see Moth Photographers Group), suggesting that additional hosts a......Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.GNR SH...
Proleucoptera smilaciella
MONA_number: 474.00
The genus Proleucoptera contains only a single described species in North America.The following is primarily based on the original description by Busck (1900a). The antenna is golden white with a well-developed eye cap. The thorax, head tuft and face are silvery white, and the labi...Local populations are restricted to sites with greenbrier (Smilax spp.), particularly species that inhabit moist to mesic forests or forest edge habitats. ...Proleucoptera smilaciella is monophagous on greenbriers. Documented host plants include Cat Greenbrier (Smilax glauca), Smooth Carrion-flower (S. herbacea), Downy Carrion-flower ...The adults are attracted to lights, and the leaf mines are easy to spot on the upper surfaces on greenbrier leaves. ...GNR SUThis species is probably more common than our records suggest since most records are based on leaf mines, which in general have received little attention from naturalists and field biologists. ...
Paraleucoptera albella
Cottonwood Leafminer Moth
MONA_number: 475.00
The following is based in part on the description by Chambers (1871) and Forbes (1923). The head, thorax, and ground color of the forewing is snowy white, and there is a small snowy white tuft on the...Local populations are dependent on willows and populars. These are most commonly found in moist to wet habitats such as floodplain forests, riverbanks, wet thickets, ditches, and the margins of lake a...Larvae feed on several species of ornamental and native poplars (Populus sp.), and at least one species of willow (Salix sp.). The known hosts include White Poplar (P. alba), Eas...The adults occasionally visit lights, but many records are based on leaf mines or adults that were reared from mines. ...GNR SUWe currently do not have sufficient information on the distribution and abundance of this species in the state to assess its conservation status. ...
sciNametaxonomic_commentsid_commentshabitatfoodobservation_methodsstate_protectionNHP_ranksstatus_comments
Caloptilia belfragella
MONA_number: 594.00
The following is based in part on the original description by Chambers (1875a). The head is purplish brown except for the white face. The labial palp is white, with a dark dot on the tip of the seco...Both the hosts and habitats are poorly documented. The larvae depend on dogwoods, but our native species include species that inhabit habitats ranging from alluvial floodplains and wetland fringes to...The only known host is Rough-leaf dogwood (Cornus drummondii). Records of this species feeding on Sumac (Rhus) and a blueberry (Vaccinium) are thought to be erroneous (Eiseman, 20...The adults occasionally visit lights, and the rolled leaves are easy to spot on native dogwoods. ...Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.GNR SU...
Caloptilia glutinella
MONA_number: 607.00
Caloptilia is a large genus with nearly 300 described species; 64 species have been described in North America north of Mexico. The larvae begin as leaf-mining sap-feeders, but the latter instars usually exit the mines and feed within a conical roll that begins at the leaf apex or at the tip of a leaf lobe.The following is based in part on Ely's (1915) original description of the type specimen from Connecticut. The face is yellow and the antenna is brown annulate with yellowish coloration at the joints ...Caloptilia glutinella is a specialist on alders, which are typically found in wetlands or wetland margins. Representative habitats include wet thickets, marshes, stream edges, and the margins o...The species was originally found on European Alder Black (Alnus glutinosa) but presumably uses several of our native alder species. The likely host in North Carolina is Hazel Alder (Alnus s...This species appear to be rare in North Carolina, and our one specimen was attracted to a black light. We recommend looking for curled leaf tips on alders during the summer months. ...GNR SU...
Phyllonorycter auronitens
MONA_number: 737.00
The following description is based primarily of the description in Braun (1908). The head is saffron brown and the face lighter. The antenna is light brown with dark annulations, and the apex is whiti...This species specializes on alders and presumably uses Hazel Alder in North Carolina. This species is found in wetlands statewide and occurs in and around marshes, fens, swamps, alluvial bottomlands,...The known hosts include Gray Alder (Alnus incana) at northern latitudes and Hazel Alder (A. serrulata) throughout much of the range, including North Carolina. ...The adults appear to only rarely visit lights and most records are based on reared adults. We recommend searching for the leaf mines on the undersides of alders during the late summer and early autumn...Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.GNR SUWe have only one record for this species as of 2021. It appears to be uncommon or rare within the state where it is at its southernmost range limit. Additional information is needed on this species d...
Stegasta bosqueella
Red-necked Peanutworm Moth
MONA_number: 2209.00
............Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands....
Stigmella villosella
MONA_number: 80.00
Members of the genus Stigmella are a group of small leaf-mining moths that typically create linear mines, although a few species form linear-blotch or blotch mines. Newton and Wilkinson (1982) recognized 51 species in their revision on the North American fauna, and new discoveries have since raised the total to around 57 species. Almost all species are specialists and rarely use more than one genus of host plants. Host-specificity, mine characteristics, and genitalic differences are helpful in recognizing closely related forms that are externally similar. The following description of the adults is from Braun (1917) and Newton and Wilkinson (1982). The palps are gray. The antenna is dark brownish gray and the eye-cap is pale golden. The tuft on the fron...Stigmella villosella is a specialist on Rubus spp., which includes blackberries and raspberries. These are common in disturbed habitats such as fields, fencerows, and roadsides. They als...Eiseman (2019) reported the following hosts: Allegheny Blackberry (Rubus allegheniensis), Common Dewberry (R. flagellaris), Swamp Dewberry (R. hispidus), Black Raspberry (R. oc...The adults are rarely attracted to lights, and most records are from leaf mines. There are almost no images of the adults, so we recommend locating mines, and rearing and photographing the adults. ...GNR SUWe currently do not have sufficient data to assess the conservation status of this species within the state. ...