Moths of North Carolina
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View PDFPyralidae Members: 4 NC Records

Sciota rubrisparsella (Ragonot, 1887) - No Common Name


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Taxonomy
Superfamily: Pyraloidea Family: PyralidaeSubfamily: PhycitinaeTribe: PhycitiniP3 Number: 800349.00 MONA Number: 5804.00
Identification
Field Guide Descriptions: Online Photographs: MPG, BugGuide, iNaturalist, Google, BAMONATechnical Description, Immature Stages: Corrette and Neuzig (1979)                                                                                 
Distribution in North Carolina
Distribution:
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Flight Dates:
 High Mountains (HM) ≥ 4,000 ft.
 Low Mountains (LM) < 4,000 ft.
 Piedmont (Pd)
 Coastal Plain (CP)

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Habitats and Life History
Habitats: The habitat at Waterlily, the site of the original collections in North Carolina, was not described by Corrette and Neugzig. The town is located along a narrow strip of land bordering Currituck Sound and has an area of hardwoods and pines located on the western side. Sugarberry usually requires rich, mesic forests, which seem unlikely at this location. Sullivan also collected two specimens from martime shrub habitat at Fort Macon, where Sugarberry is not known to occur.
Larval Host Plants: Larvae feed on Celtis (Heinrich, 1956) and have been observed feeding on Sugarberry (Celtis laevigata) in North Carolina (Corrette and Neunzig, 1979). However, records from Fort Macon suggest a wider range of host plants may be used: Celtis laevigata has not been recorded in the park although it has been found in association with shell middens (Weakley, 2015) and a population has recently been discovered on Bogue Banks (John Fussell, pers. comm. to JBS).
Wikipedia
Status in North Carolina
Natural Heritage Program Status:
Natural Heritage Program Ranks: GNR SU
State Protection:
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