Moths of North Carolina
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12 NC Records

Cameraria corylisella Chambers, 1871 - No Common Name



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Taxonomy
Superfamily: Gracillarioidea Family: GracillariidaeSubfamily: LithocolletinaeP3 Number: 330354.00 MONA Number: 817.00
Comments: This is one of over 50 Cameraria species that have been described from North America.
Identification
Field Guide Descriptions: Online Photographs: MPG, BugGuide, BAMONATechnical Description, Adults: Braun (1908); Eiseman (2017)                                                                                 
Adult Markings: The forewings of the adults have a light tawny ground color that is overlain with three narrow white bands that are edged on the posterior margin with black. The subterminal band is broken, and there is a small white spot with a black edge near the apex. Cameraria corylisella and C. ostryarella are very closely related and are often difficult to distinguish from each other (Eiseman 2017). According to Braun (1908), the apical dusting of brown on the forewing is the most reliable way to distinguish C. ostryarella (C. corylisella lacks the brown dusting). Raising adults from leaf mines on hazelnuts is definitive since C. corylisella appears to only use Corylus, while C. ostryarella uses Carpinus and Ostrya.
Wingspan: 6.5-7.0 mm (Braun 1908)
Adult ID Requirements: Identifiable from good quality photos of unworn specimens.
Immatures and Development: The larvae mine the leaves of hazelnuts. Each mine contains a single larva that can be easily observed by examining a backlit leaf. The larvae produce upper surface blotch mines that are more or less circular in shape with irregular borders. The center is dark brownish yellow and is surrounded by a white to pale yellow border. Populations appear to be bivoltine (Eiseman 2017), and larvae from the last seasonal brood pupate and overwinter inside of the dried leaves. The adult emerge following the spring warm-up.
Larvae ID Requirements: Identifiable from good quality photos, especially where associated with known host plants.
Distribution in North Carolina
Distribution: Scattered records for this species occur from Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec, and Maine, southward to Wisconsin, Illinois and Kentucky (Pohl et al. 2018). Cameraria corylisella was only recently detected in North Carolina. As of 2022, populations have been found in the mountains and western Piedmont, with one record from the eastern Piedmont. Populations in North Carolina are likely restricted to the Blue Ridge and Piedmont provinces since our native hazelnut species -- which are the primary hosts -- are only rarely found in the Coastal Plain.
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Flight Dates:
 High Mountains (HM) ≥ 4,000 ft.
 Low Mountains (LM) < 4,000 ft.
 Piedmont (Pd)
 Coastal Plain (CP)

Click on graph to enlarge
Immature Dates:
 High Mountains (HM) ≥ 4,000 ft.
 Low Mountains (LM) < 4,000 ft.
 Piedmont (Pd)
 Coastal Plain (CP)

Click on graph to enlarge
Flight Comments: Almost no data is available on the flight season for North Carolina populations. The adults from areas outside of North Carolina are generally active from April through September, with a peak during the mid-summer months. As of 2022, we have observed mines in the mountains from June through late September. There appear to be two broods, with larvae overwintering in the mines and the adults of the first brood emerging with the spring warm-up.
Habitats and Life History
Habitats: This species primarily uses hazelnuts as hosts and local populations mostly occur where hazelnuts are present. Our two native species of hazelnuts occur in a wide variety of habitats that range from dry, rocky ridge tops and woods (Corylus cornuta) to more mesic forests, stream edges and even swamps (C. americana). Hazelnuts often thrive where there are open woods or thickets.
Larval Host Plants: Cameraria corylisella is a rather specialized leafminer that uses both beaked hazelnut (Corylus cornuta) and American Hazelnut (C. americana). It also uses American Hornbeam (Carpinus caroliniana), but apparently relatively rarely in North Carolina.
Observation Methods: Local populations are most easily located by searching for the distinctive leaf mines that occur on hazelnut leaves. The adults appear to only occasionally come to lights.
Wikipedia
See also Habitat Account for General Corylaceous Thickets and Understories
Status in North Carolina
Natural Heritage Program Status:
Natural Heritage Program Ranks: GNR S2S4
State Protection:
Comments: North Carolina is at the southernmost range limit of Cameraria corylisella. This species was only recently discovered in North Carolina and we have only 10 records as of 2022. The previous southernmost records were from Kentucky. We are uncertain to what extent the scarcity of records for NC reflects this species being overlooked in the past. Without more information on the distribution, frequency of occurrence, and population trends of this species we cannot currently make any meaningful estimate of its conservation status.

 Photo Gallery for Cameraria corylisella - No common name

Photos: 21

Recorded by: Ken Kneidel on 2022-09-25
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: Ken Kneidel on 2022-09-25
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: Ken Kneidel on 2022-09-25
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2022-09-15
Caldwell Co.
Comment: Occupied mines were on American Hazelnut.
Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2022-09-15
Caldwell Co.
Comment: Occupied mines were on American Hazelnut.
Recorded by: tom ward on 2022-05-26
Buncombe Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: tom ward on 2022-05-26
Buncombe Co.
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Recorded by: tom ward on 2022-05-21
Buncombe Co.
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Recorded by: Ken Kneidel on 2021-08-22
Burke Co.
Comment: Mines on American Hazelnut.
Recorded by: Ken Kneidel on 2021-08-22
Burke Co.
Comment: Mines on American Hazelnut.
Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2021-07-22
Cherokee Co.
Comment: Unoccupied mine was on Beaked Hazelnut.
Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2021-06-15
Madison Co.
Comment: Occupied mine was on Beaked Hazelnut (Corylus cornuta)
Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2021-06-15
Madison Co.
Comment: Occupied mine was on Beaked Hazelnut (Corylus cornuta)
Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2020-07-10
Madison Co.
Comment: An adult that was reared from a mine on Beaked Hazelnut (Corylus cornutus). Mine was collected on 20 June; adult emerged on 10 July.
Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2020-07-10
Madison Co.
Comment: An adult that was reared from a mine on Beaked Hazelnut (Corylus cornutus). Mine was collected on 20 June; adult emerged on 10 July.
Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2020-06-25
Buncombe Co.
Comment: On American Hazelnut (Corylus americana)
Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2020-06-25
Buncombe Co.
Comment: Underside of leaf of American Hazelnut (Corylus americana).
Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2020-06-20
Madison Co.
Comment: An active blotch mine on Beaked Hazelnut (Corylus cornuta).
Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2019-08-25
Madison Co.
Comment: An upper surface blotch mine on Beaked Hazelnut (Corylus cornuta). Note the larva in the upper right region of the mine (see companion photo of the larva).
Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2019-08-25
Madison Co.
Comment: A larva that was removed from a surface mine.
Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2019-08-11
Madison Co.
Comment: Three blotch mines on beaked hazelnut (Corylus cornuta). Each mine had a single larva.