Hoppers of North Carolina:
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CICADELLIDAE Members: NC Records

Ponana pectoralis - No Common Name



© Kyle Kittelberger- side view

© Kyle Kittelberger- top view
Taxonomy
Family: CICADELLIDAESubfamily: Iassinae
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: A variably-marked species that is typically green and brown. Adults have a green head, thorax, and [typically] outer half of the forewing. The vertex is broadly produced and rounded. The scutellum is typically pale brown with a whitish posterior half and rufous anterior corners. The inner half of the forewings and wingtips are typically brownish (ranging from light to dark brown), forming a distinctive brown streak down the middle of the back that widens towards the wings tips. There are some black dots, mostly scattered within the brown area on the back. The legs and eyes are brown. Some individuals though can have much darker wings; see here for variation among adults. The female pregenital sternite has the posterior margin broadly but shallowly notched in the middle with lateral lobes. The male subgenital plates are elongate and rectangular. Adults are 8.0-10.0 mm long. (DeLong 1948)

Nymphs are a dull brownish-green, with early instars uniformly dark brown.

Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Distribution: Common and widespread, recorded across North America (BG)
Abundance: Scattered records from across the state, uncommon to locally common; likely more abundant in the right habitat.
Seasonal Occurrence
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Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Woodlands, forest edge
Plant Associates:
Behavior: Can be attracted at night with a light.
Comment: NOTE: For many years, green Gyponana nymphs with brown lateral margins were incorrectly identified as belonging to Ponana pectoralis.

It is believed that Ponana pectoralis may consist of multiple cryptic species. This is a wide-ranging species in the eastern United States, and there is enough variation in color and pattern that multiple cryptic species may be present. This is supported by limited, preliminary genetic barcoding.

Status: Native
Global and State Rank:

Species Photo Gallery for Ponana pectoralis No Common Name

Photo by: Jim Petranka
Madison Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Jim Petranka
Madison Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Jim Petranka
Madison Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Yancey Co.
Comment: 10 mm, came to CFL, UV light combo, cove forest edge with small lawn and meadow nearby
Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Yancey Co.
Comment: 10 mm, came to CFL, UV light combo, cove forest edge with small lawn and meadow nearby
Photo by: Vin Stanton
Madison Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Randy L Emmitt
Orange Co.
Comment: uv light
Photo by: Kenneth Kneidel
Yancey Co.
Comment: 9.7 mm
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Ashe Co.
Comment: collected by Bo Sullivan
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Ashe Co.
Comment: collected by Bo Sullivan
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Ashe Co.
Comment: collected by Bo Sullivan
Photo by: Rob Van Epps
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: Attracted to black light.
Photo by: Rob Van Epps
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: Attracted to black light.
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Orange Co.
Comment: Mixed hardwood forest edge
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Avery Co.
Comment: grassy, open area with shrubby vegetation and mixed forest nearby
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Avery Co.
Comment: grassy, open area with shrubby vegetation and mixed forest nearby
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Avery Co.
Comment: grassy, open area with shrubby vegetation and mixed forest nearby
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Orange Co.
Comment: Mixed hardwood forest edge
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Orange Co.
Comment: Mixed hardwood forest edge