Hoppers of North Carolina:
Spittlebugs, Leafhoppers, Treehoppers, and Planthoppers
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sciNamedescriptionabundancehabitatfood
Paraphlepsius torridusA brownish, densely reticulated species with a produced, pointed crown that is sharply angled towards the face. The female pregenital sternite has the median lobes wide and blunt, with the posterior margin a sort of } shape. The male subgenital plates are triangular. Adult males are 4.6-5.1 mm long, females are 4.8-5.8 mm. (Hamilton 1975)

For diagrams of this species, see: Dmitriev.

Scattered records across the state; possibly under collected and therefore more abundant in the right habitat.
Chlorotettix divergensA pale yellow to greenish species with dark eyes and subhyaline forewings. The crown is roundedly produced with a pronounced pointed apex. The male subgenital plates are broad at the base, narrowing to a thin apex with a sinuate lateral margin. The female pregenital sternite has the posterior margin deeply excavated, with the excavation extending much of the length of the sternite, characteristic of this species; the median of the excavation has a small V-shaped notch and is embrowned around the border on either side. Males are 6.7-7.3 mm long, females are 7.0-7.4 mm. (Cwikla 1988)

For additional images of this species, see: BG.

Recent records from a county in the Coastal Plain, likely more abundant in the right habitat, particularly in this part of the state. Grassy areas in pine woodlands (Cwikla 1988)Tall grass species?
Chlorotettix orbonatusGreenish overall with a slight brown tinge to the wings, pronotum and scutellum. The wing venation is a combination of both pale, indistinct and dark veins. The female pregenital sternite is extremely distinctive as it lacks an excavation and instead extends outwards, with a sinuous shape. Adults are around 5.0 mm long, at least. Recorded from several counties in the Coastal Plain and Piedmont; likely under collected and therefore under reported.Has been found in open grassy areas, forest edge?
Melanoliarus unidentified speciesMixed hardwood forest, forest edge, grassy areas, etc.
Melanoliarus aridusThis species has a distinctive wing pattern. There are three spots in a diagonal line on each wing (in some bold specimens, these dots connect). The base of the wings are often dark, though this is not always present in some individuals. The wings are typically milky subhyaline but sometimes vitreous (clear). The wing veins are typically pale yellow basally, becoming brownish towards the apex; the stigma is light to dark brown. Overall, the coloration of this species is usually a reddish/brickish color, although it can range towards black. The vertex and mesonotum range in color from piceous (glossy brownish-black) to castaneous (chestnut), and the mesonotal carinae are concolorous in some specimens, but usually a dull orange or yellow-brown. The vertex is broad, with the median length equal to or exceeding the width at the apex of the posterior emargination. The face has various coloration but is usually chestnut- the median carinae are usually orange. However, there are two distinctive pale spots on the frons, characteristic of this species. The eyes are speckled, also characteristic of this species. Adult males are 5.9-8.4 mm long. (Mead & Kramer, 1982; S. Hendrix, pers. comments)

For more images of this species, see: BG. For images of pinned specimens, see: BOLD.

Previously reported from the state; recently recorded from the Piedmont. Likely abundant across the state.Adults have been collected from the following plants: Helianthus sp., Prunus persica, Vernonia interior, Polygonum sp., Medicago sativa, Apium graveolens, Prunus cerasus, Citrus paradisi, Carya sp., grass sp., Gossypium sp., Tillandsia usneoides, Quercus virginiana, Zea mays, Zanthoxylum clavaherculis. (Mead & Kramer, 1982)

"Nymphs of cixiids are subterranean, feeding on roots and possibly fungi. The significance of adult host records is unclear. Many cixiids are presumed to be polyphagous (as adults), most often on woody plants." (UDEL)

Melanoliarus humilisA distinctive species. The vertex and mesonotum are dark brown to black, and the face is entirely fuscous except for carinae that vary from brown to dull orange. The vertex is variably wide but usually appears broad and divergent basally. The wings lack spots and are hyaline except for the apical third (the tips), which are contrastingly dark; in some specimens, the basal two-thirds of the wing are almost concolorous with the tips. The wing venation is a uniform brown color. Small, with males 4.1 to 5.0 mm long. (Mead & Kramer, 1982)

See here for images of live adults, and here for pinned specimens.

Recorded from a few counties in the Piedmont.Has been reported from pasture, bogs, prairie, river edge, rye, etc.; seems to predominate in damp habitats in cooler climates. (Mead & Kramer, 1982)Adults have been taken from Poa pratensis, Carya sp., Asimina sp., and Medicago sativa. (Mead & Kramer, 1982)

"Nymphs of cixiids are subterranean, feeding on roots and possibly fungi. The significance of adult host records is unclear. Many cixiids are presumed to be polyphagous (as adults), most often on woody plants." (UDEL)

Penestragania robustaA green species (fading to yellow with age and/or in collected specimens), with many short black hairs (setae) scattered across the surface of the wings; sometimes these hairs can be pale, and there may be dark rings at the base of them. The vertex is short and broadly rounded, less wide than the pronotum. The posterior margin of the female pregenital sternite is barely excavated and is slightly bisinuate, with a small median projection. Adult males are 3.2-4.3 mm long, females are 3.6-4.7 mm. (Beamer & Lawson, 1945), (Blocker, 1970)

Nymphs have a green body, densely covered with white pubescence which grows thicker and longer as the nymph ages.

See here for more images of this species: BG.

Rare in the state (but possibly overlooked or undercollected), with a couple records from the Piedmont and Coastal Plain (though Blocker 1970 indicates there are other records for the state).Blocker (1970) notes multiple host plants for this species; those reported from the southeastern United States are: Axonopus compressus, Cynodon dactylon, Iva sp., Larrea tridentata glutinosa, Medicago sativa, Paspalum notatum, & Prunus augustifolia
sciNamedescriptionabundancehabitatfood
Texananus longipennisA large brownish species, with adults 8.5-10.0 mm long; it can range smaller than the other two Iowanus species in the state (see Comments section). The pronotum is yellowish, blotched with brown on the anterior third and with brown irrorations on the posterior two-thirds. The scutellum is brownish, with a pair of ivory white spots on the lateral margins. There is a transverse band between the eyes, broadest at the middle; there are a pair of spots near the apex of the crown. The face is brownish with darker markings. The wings have a dense reticulated and evenly-marked mesh-like dark brown pattern, lacking distinct spots on the costal margin. The vertex has a bold white tip, in front of a broken black band between the eyes; the crown is a little narrower than the other two Iowanus species. The female pregenital sternite has a narrow medial notch (more of a slit) that extends between a third to a half of the way inwards; the posterior sides of the notch extend outwards slightly, with the posterior margin of the sternite weakly concave towards the lateral sides. The pregenital sternite is brownish with a somewhat broad blackish coloration near the notch, decreasing in width the closer to the anterior edge of this sternite; its lateral margins are mostly parallel. The male subgenital plates are relatively close to one another, with a slight gap between them; together, they are triangular in shape, with slightly rounded lateral (rather than straight) margins near the base. (Crowder, 1952)

For diagrams of this species, see: Dmitriev.

Recorded from across the state but infrequent, can be locally common; likely under reported and more abundant in the right habitat.Open grassy, brushy areas, open woodland, woodland edge
Texananus caducusA large brownish species, with adult males around 8.0 mm long and females 9.0-9.5 mm long. The entire body and wings have a dense reticulated mesh-like dark brown pattern, extending onto the face. The vertex has a tan to white tip, in front of a broken dark brown band between the eyes that is enlarged on either end. The female pregenital sternite has a broad V-shaped medial notch, extending about a third to halfway towards the anterior margin; the posterior sides of the notch end in a slightly produced sharp tooth, with the posterior margin of the sternite concavely rounded towards the lateral sides (the posterior lateral angles are acutely produced). The pregenital sternite is mostly a light brown to tan color, with somewhat broad black coloration around the notch and along the midline, becoming narrower in size and extent the closer to the anterior margin. The male subgenital plates are somewhat close to one another, with a noticeable gap between them; together, they are triangular in shape, being long and tapered but curving outwards near the base. (DeLong & Hershberger, 1948; Crowder, 1952)

For diagrams of this species, see: Dmitriev.

Recorded recently from a couple counties in the Piedmont and Coastal Plain, probably more abundant in the right habitat.Has been found near mixed hardwood forest; woodlandsHerbaceous vegetation
Texananus majestusA large reddish-brown species, with adults 9.0-10.0 mm long. The entire body and wings have a dense reticulated mesh-like dark brown pattern, extending onto the face. The vertex is bluntly angled and has a tan to white tip, in front of a conspicuous, irregular and broken transverse dark brown to fuscous band between the eyes; there are typically two fuscous spots in front of the band on the vertex. The anterior portion of the pronotum has dark vermiculate markings, and the wings are heavily mottled with chestnut-brown. The female pregenital sternite is two to three times as wide as long and has a narrow but deep medial incision, extending about halfway to the anterior margin; the posterior sides of the notch end in a somewhat sharp tooth, with the lateral posterior angles of the sternite broadly rounded. The lateral margins of the pregenital sternite are also almost parallel. The pregenital sternite is mostly a light brown to tan color, with some darker mottling near the notch. The male subgenital plates are close to one another, without a noticeably gap between them; together, they are triangular in shape and are long and narrow with broad, blunt and rounded apices. (DeLong & Hershberger, 1948; Crowder 1952)

For diagrams of this species, see: Dmitriev. For more images of individuals that have supposedly been identified as this species, see: BG.

Recorded from a couple counties in the Piedmont and Coastal Plain; likely more abundant in the right habitat.Open woodlandsHerbaceous plants
Paraphlepsius geneticusA brownish species, uniformly colored, with a short crown rounded apically that is angled towards the face. The reticulated markings on the wings are sharply defined and evenly spread, touching the wing venation. The pronotum and head are yellowish. The female pregenital sternite is nearly as long as it is wide and has four subequal lobes and a well developed median notch; there is a dark border to the sides of the notch, on the posterior margin. The male subgenital plates are kind of trapezoidal in shape, with blunt, rounded apexes. Adult males are 6.7 mm long, females are 7.1 mm. (Hamilton 1975)

For images of a specimen, see: NCSU.

Recorded from a single county in the Coastal Plain; possibly more abundant in the right habitat.Coastal
Paraphlepsius collitusA mottled species [usually] with dark, densely retiulate wings with many pale, white spots. These spots form very indistinct pale diagonal bands. The scutellum, pronotum, and head are yellowish, contrasting sharply with the dark wings; in some individuals, the pronotum has dark brown mottling but the yellowish base is still present and visible. The crown is broadly rounded and not strongly produced, weakly angled to the face. The female pregenital sternite has lobed lateral margins; the posterior margin is } shaped, with a median projection that has a slit in the middle. The concave margins to the side of the median projection have a dark border. The male subgenital plates are triangular, with rounded lateral margins. Males are 4.8-5.8 mm long, while females are 4.9-6.4 mm long (Hamilton 1975).

For diagrams of this species, see: Dmitriev. For additional images of this species, see: BG.

A somewhat common species with scattered records across the state in all three regions; likely more abundant in the right habitat.Has been found in grassy, brushy areas and forest edge; also mixed hardwood forest and open woodlands.Has been found on sweetgum.
Paraphlepsius quadratusA dark brownish species with a noticeably pointed and produced crown that is sharply angled to the face. The male subgenital plates are elongate and triangular. The female pregenital sternite has the median lobes noticeably shorter than the lateral lobes on the posterior margin; there is a prominent excavation between the lobes, with a small median notch and a discernible indentation down the middle. Adult males are 5.9-6.4 mm long, females are 6.3-7.0 mm. (Hamilton 1975) Nymphs are dark brownish overall and show the characteristic pointed head that the adults have.

For images of specimens of this species, see: BOLD and BG.

Recorded from several counties in the Piedmont and Coastal Plain
Paraphlepsius operculatusA brownish species with a head and thorax that are slightly paler than the wings, which are densely reticulated. The head is wider than the pronotum, and the crown is short and apically rounded to the face. The female pregenital sternite has a very deep V-shaped medial notch. The male subgenital plates are large and broad with hooked tips (almost resemble crab claws); very distinctive. Adult males are 6.1-7.0 mm long, females are 6.3-7.1 mm. (Hamilton 1975)

For diagrams of this species, see: Dmitriev.

A single record from the mountains, probably under collected and therefore possibly more abundant in the right habitat.
sciNamedescriptionabundancehabitatfood
Paraphlepsius latifronsA brownish species with a head and thorax that are slightly paler than the wings, which are densely reticulated; the scutellum is usually a contrastingly yellow color. The head is wider than the pronotum, and the crown is short and apically rounded to the face. The female pregenital sternite is shallow and roundedly notched; the notch is U-shaped (rather than V-shaped). The male subgenital plates are large and broad with hooked tips (almost resemble crab claws); very distinctive. Adult males are 6.0-6.5 mm long, females are 6.6-7.3 mm. (Hamilton 1975)

For diagrams of this species, see: Dmitriev. For an image of a specimen, see: BOLD.

Recorded from a few counties in the Piedmont and Coastal Plain; likely under collected and therefore more abundant in the right habitat.
Paraphlepsius mimusBrownish overall with a fairly rounded crown, both on the margin and apically towards the face. The male subgenital plates have lobate lateral margins that noticeably diverge from one another, characteristic of this species. The female pregenital sternite is strongly tapered and truncate with a relatively flat/straight posterior margin, lacking a pronounced median notch; there is dark coloration on the sternite. Adult males are 5.4-6.4 mm long, females are 6.2-7.5 mm. (Hamilton 1975)

For diagrams of this species, see: Dmitriev.

Recorded from several counties in the Coastal Plain and Piedmont; probably under collected and therefore more abundant in the right habitat.
Paraphlepsius carolinusA brownish, reticulated species with a produced, pointed crown that is sharply angled towards the face. The female pregenital sternite is long with similar median and lateral that are strongly raised; there is a small median notch. The male subgenital plates are triangular. Adult males are 5.7-6.4 mm long, females are 6.0-7.1 mm. (Hamilton 1975)

For diagrams of this species, see: Dmitriev.

Several records across the state; possibly under collected and therefore more abundant in the right habitat.
Erythroneura carinataA banded species with a yellow or white dorsum and a red, orange, or brown color pattern. There are two parallel orange submedial lines on the head with a pale midline, though this can sometimes be fused into a single thicker mark. The body has three dark transverse bands- on the thorax, middle of the wings, and wing tips. The thoracic band, which extends across the upper part of the mesonotum/scutellum and most of the pronotum, is brownish-red; the apex of the scutellum is contrastingly pale. The anterior side of the band facing the vertex typically fades into the head. The band across the wings is a pale red, as if someone has erased the color of the band; this is key for the species. The wing tips are dark gray to blackish. There is a large blue to black spot on the costal margin of each wing, and a distal spot in the second apical wing cell. The face and underside of the thorax are completely pale. Adults are 3.0-3.2 mm long. (Dmitriev & Dietrich, 2007)

For more pics of this species, see: BG.

Recently recorded in the state, known from a few counties in the Piedmont; likely more abundant in the right habitat.Has been found in mixed hardwood forest.Vitis sp. (3I)
Paraphlepsius fuscipennisA tawny brown species mottled with white irrorations. The crown is short and rounded, not produced. The female pregenital sternite has sharp lateral lobes and a minute notch on the median projection; there is a small dark border on the sides of the projection. The male subgenital plates are long and triangular. Adult males are 5.3-5.8 mm long, females are 6.0-6.6 mm. (Hamilton 1975)Recorded from several counties in the Coastal Plain; likely more abundant along the coast.Only found in saltwater marshes (Hamilton 1975)
Paraphlepsius abruptusA tawny brown species. This species has a pointed but rounded vertex. The wings are densely reticulate. The female pregenital sternite has four subequal lobes, with the median ones turned outwards; there is a large median notch in the posterior margin, which is outlined in black. The male subgenital plates are long and triangular. Adult males are 5.8-6.5 mm long, while females are 6.0-7.0 mm. (Hamilton 1975)

For diagrams of this species, see: Dmitriev.

Rare, a single recent record from the Coastal Plain; likely under-collected more abundant.
Paraphlepsius continuusA medium-sized, brownish leafhopper. This species has a rounded head margin, not sharply angled towards the face, and the head itself is rounded without a noticeable point. The wings, pronotum, and head are mostly orange to brown in color with small white dots across the body; the wings are densely reticulate. The female pregenital sternite has rounded lateral lobes and a notch in the middle of the posterior margin, causing the margin to resemble a } in shape; there is a small dark border on the sides of the projection. The male subgenital plates are long and triangular. Adult males are 5.5-6.2 mm long, while females are 5.6-7.1 mm. (Hamilton 1975)

For diagrams of this species, see: Dmitriev.

Somewhat common, recorded across the Piedmont and Coastal Plain; likely more abundant in the right habitat.Has been found in grassy areas, as well as in or near mixed hardwood forest.Sedges (BG)
sciNamedescriptionabundancehabitatfood
Texananus superbusA robust brownish species with a broad, narrow head. The wings are pale brown with a dark brown and black network of reticulated lines. The head, pronotum, and scutellum are a pale tan color, contrasting with the wings. There are several white spots down the back. The underside is dark brown. The female pregenital sternite is quite distinctive, with a broad rounded excavation that reaches halfway to the anterior base. The male plates are short and broad and together form a semicircular shape. Adults are 6.0 mm long. (DeLong & Hershberger 1949)

For diagrams of the genitalia of this species, see: Dmitriev. For images of live individuals, see: BG.

Recorded from a single county in the Piedmont; rare.Fields, grassy areas, etc.
Paraphlepsius brunneusA brownish (tawny brown to chocolate-brown) species with evenly-marked, reticulated wings and a produced, apically pointed crown that is angled towards the face. The female pregenital sternite has a deep slit mesally, distinctive for this species, and an otherwise sinusoidal posterior margin; it is usually heavily dark-margined in the middle. The male subgenital plates are trapezoidal and do not meet basally (there is a gap separating them). Adult males are 6.7-7.3 mm long, females are 6.9-7.4 mm. (Hamilton 1975)

For diagrams of this species, see: Dmitriev. For additional images of this species, see: BG.

Recently recorded from a single county in the Coastal Plain, probably more abundant.
Melanoliarus placitusThis species has a dark face, head, and thorax, ranging from fuscous to fuscocastaneous/castaneous; the carinae of the mesonotum are concolorous in most specimens but orange in others. The wings are variable in degree of spotting, with some specimens largely immaculate and others heavily spotted. The costal cell tends to have three weakly developed spots. In some specimens, the inner margin of the wings is black along the commissure, sometimes with dark spots giving an overall "key-like" appearance. The wing venation ranges from stramineous (yellowish) to brownish, with most specimens having fairly pale veins. The stigma on each wing is a bold dark brown to black. The legs are pale yellowish-brown. Adult males are typically 6.1 to 8.8 mm long, with females ranging as high as 10.7 mm. (Mead & Kramer, 1982)

For more images, see here for probable images of live adults, and here and here and here for various angles of pinned specimens.

Scattered records across the state, uncommon.Has been found in maritime shrub; also reported from woodland and pine flatwoods. (Mead & Kramer, 1982)"Nymphs of cixiids are subterranean, feeding on roots and possibly fungi. The significance of adult host records is unclear. Many cixiids are presumed to be polyphagous (as adults), most often on woody plants." (UDEL)
Xestocephalus n-species2
Probable Undescribed Xestocephalus Species
This species is mottled in color, with the wing cells an array of orange, brown, white, and black. The pronotum and head are a pale brown with largely scattered whitish patches, strongly contrasting with the wings and giving this species a unique appearance. The head has pale ][ shaped markings on the vertex. The underside is dark brown to blackish, and the female pregenital sternite has a concave posterior margin with a V-shaped notch. This species is large for the genus, being around 3.5 mm long. Recorded from a handful of counties in the Piedmont and Coastal Plain. Possibly more abundant in the right habitat, especially in coastal counties.Has been found in mixed to open forest habitat.
Xestocephalus n-species
Undescribed Xestocephalus Species
This species is large for the genus, being around 4.0 mm long. It ranges in color from an orange-brown to dark brown, with darker brown to black cells on the wings contrasting with white and clear ones. The pronotum tends to have scattered pale speckling, while the head tends to be a largely uniform color with no defined markings. The frons is pale brown and unmarked. Females are blackish ventrally on the thorax and abdomen. Recorded from a handful of counties in the Piedmont and Coastal Plain. Possibly more abundant in the right habitat, especially in coastal counties.Has been found in mixed to open forest habitat.
Micrutalis malleifera
Pseudo-Curly Top Treehopper
A variably colored species. Some individuals resemble M. calva, with black across most of the pronotum except for a pale tip. Other individuals however are quite distinctive, with a broad white border around the black part of the pronotum and some orange marks present as well. Adults are 2.8-3.6 mm long. See FSCA for more information.Rare, only recorded from Dare county in the Coastal Plain.CoastalNightshade (Physalis spp.; CTNC); in FL, also recorded from Lycopersicum esculentum and Solanum spp. (FSCA)
Eratoneura lunataThe wings and body are mostly a pale yellowish-white to whitish color, but there are four dark blackish marks on the middle of the wings, forming an upside down U that curves towards the wing tips when viewed from above. There are orange-red markings toward the rear of the wings, with some darker markings past this in the apical cells. There is a dark mark and red line extending from the costal margin. The vertex is pale with a pale midline, sometimes with orange parallel submedial lines (often with lateral branches). The face is pale. There is a blackish irregular band across the base of the scutellum and wings. The thoracic venter has dark mesosternum, with the remainder pale. Adults are 2.8- 3.0 mm long. (3I)

For more images of this species, see: BG.

Rare, only recently recorded from the Coastal Plain.Oak, primarily Quercus pagoda and Q. alba; also recorded from others oaks such as Q. falcata, Q. michauxii, Q. phellos, and Q. stellata, as well as Ulmus alata and Carya ovata (3I).
sciNamedescriptionabundancehabitatfood
Eratoneura hymettanaThe wings and body are mostly a pale whitish color, but there are four dark faded marks (almost rectangular in shape) on the middle of the wings, forming an upside down U when viewed from above; these dark marks can vary from reddish-brown to dark gray. There are a couple broken orange bands towards the rear of the wings, past the darker marks. There is a small black spot at the base of the 4th apical cell in each wing. The vertex is yellowish brown, and there is a yellow and orange set of markings across the anterior edge of the pronotum; the rest of the pronotum is almost entirely pale. The scutellar angles are yellow-orange, and there are a couple large orange spots on the base of the wings to either side of the scutellum. Adults are 2.9- 3.2 mm long. (3I)Recorded from the Piedmont, and likely to occur in the mountains as well since it has been collected across the border in Appalachia Tennessee; likely a very uncommon to rare species in the state.Forested areas with sycamoreAmerican Sycamore (Platanus occidentalis; 3I)
Eratoneura nr. lunataA species with a distinctive color pattern. The wings and body are mostly a pale, yellow to white color, but there are four dark black marks (almost rectangular in shape) on the middle of the wings, forming an upside down U when viewed from above. There is an incomplete brownish band across the base of the wings and scutellum, and a broken band towards the rear of the wings, past the black marks; this rear band consists of red markings in some individuals, a smudgy band in others. The wingtips are also brown, giving the appearance of a third band in some individuals. The vertex and pronotum are largely pale.Recorded from a few counties in the Piedmont and Coastal Plain; likely a very uncommon to rare species in the state.Has been found near mixed hardwood forest habitat.
Stroggylocephalus mixtusA robust brownish species, varying from uniform to mottled brown. This species can be distinguished from other Aphrodinae by its short, broad, rounded crown. Adult males are 5.0-6.2 mm long, while females are 5.8-6.5 mm. (Hamilton 1975)Rare. So far found in the mountains. Has been found in litter sampling on the ground.
Scaphytopius verecundusAn orange-brown species with a short but sharply pointed head (longer in some individuals), typically more than twice as long than the width between the eyes. There is a pair of white spots on either side of the midline on the vertex, forming a pattern that is distinctive to this species; there also some pale spots at the base of the vertex (the posterior margin). The scutellum is orange, with bold orange lateral triangles, and the pronotum tends to be lighter than the vertex (which is a dark reddish color); the face is a dark orange-brown color. The wings are orange-brown with white areolar spots scattered throughout. The female pregenital sternite is roundedly produced on the posterior margin. The male subgenital plates are elongate and triangular, slightl diverging from one another. Adults are 3.5-4.2 mm long, with females longer than males. (DeLong 1948), (Hepner 1947)

For diagrams of this species, see: Zahniser.

Several records from the Coastal Plain; probably under collected and more abundant in the right habitat. Woodlands, grassy areas, shrubby vegetationMixed stands of low shrubs belong to the familyies Ericaceae and Vacciniaceae (Hepner 1947)
Pareuidella trilobaA light brown to reddish-brown species, with an unmarked face and body. This species can be both macropterous and brachypterous. The appendages at the tip of the male abdomen are a distinctive shape for this species.

For images of a pinned specimen, see: UDEL.

Several records from the Piedmont and Coastal Plain.
Neocoelidia tuberculataA greenish to yellowish-green species with a distinctive, characteristic dark stripe down the wings along the commissure. The head is pointed, visible from above, and there is a distinct angle to the face near the mouth (visible from the side) (BG). The eyes are typically a bold yellow color. This species also has very long antennae, about the same length as the wings. The female pregenital sternite is broadly, roundedly produced with a slight median notch in the posterior margin. Adults are 6.0-7.0 mm long. (DeLong 1953)

Nymphs are greenish overall with a pointed head, resembling the adult.

A fairly uncommon species with scattered records across the state, primarily in the Coastal Plain; likely more abundant in the state in the right habitat.Has been found in grassy, brushy areas, as well as pine and mixed hardwood forest.Pines (BG)
Scaphoideus melanotusA dark, blackish species with an interrupted white dorsal longitudinal stripe. The crown is white, with a brown anterior marginal line interrupted at the apex; there is a transverse orange line between the anterior margins of the eyes, with a diamond-shaped mark anteriorly produced in the middle. The eyes are described as being brown with a white longitudinal line, but appear red or bicolored in some individuals. The face is a diagnostic intense black, sometimes with a small white medial dot below the crown margin and on the clypeus. The anterior third of the pronotum is orange with two small medial black or brown dots; the medial posterior two-thirds is white, sometimes with light yellow-orange areas in the middle, and the posterior third is whitish; there is a dark brown to black area laterally on each side of the pronotum. The scutellum has the anterior half [largely, usually] yellow-brown with two medial white bards with posterior black dots (in some individuals, the color is more reddish-orange than yellow-brown); the posterior half of the scutellum is white with lateral black dots. The wings are mostly black, with black venation; some cells though are white translucent [particularly down the commissure]. The coxae are black and the hind femur is sometimes light brown; the rest of the leg segments are yellowish-brown. The abdominal terga are dorsally brown, and laterally and ventrally white; the third sternum is brown, the remaining are brown and white. The male subgenital plates are narrow with two large medial setae. The pygofer is brown and white, with a dark brwno oblique bar near the posterior third. The female pregenital sternite is anteriorly white and posteriorly brown to black; the sternite is produced posteriorly, with a distinctive V-shaped notch in the median projection. Adult males are 4.9-5.3 mm long, females are 5.2-5.9 mm. (Barnett 1976)

For more images of this species, see: BG.

Uncommon, largely recorded from the mountains and Piedmont. Mixed hardwood forest, forest edges, montane hardwood forests, other wooded areas, meadows, etc.American elm, Juniperus spp., Opantia spp. (Barnett 1976)
sciNamedescriptionabundancehabitatfood
Eutettix luridusA typically dark to reddish brown species. This species has dark brown to reddish wings with a small white "saddle" in the middle of the tegmen near the apex of the clavus; the apical cells are sometimes clouded. The vertex and pronotum are a tan to ivory-yellow color, as is the scutellum which also has distinctive brownish lateral triangles; there are fulvous to deep reddish-brown markings on the vertex and pronotum. The frons is fulvous with lighter markings. The eyes are also red, and the face is light brown. The female pregenital sternite is roundedly produced, slightly notched on either side of a small median tooth. Adult males are 5.5 mm, females are 6.0 mm long. (DeLong 1948), (Hepner, 1942)Recorded from a handful of counties in the Piedmont, probably more abundant in the right habitat.Has been found in mixed hardwood forest.Oaks (Chandler & Hamilton 2017)
Hymetta trifasciataA boldly patterned species that can vary in darkness. Adults have a pale yellowish-white body; the head and pronotum are largely a pale white color, sometimes with dull sanguineous spots present. The wings have a whitish base color, with three crossbands (see comments section below for crossband info). The first crossband is strongly narrowed along the costal margin; this band is quite dark and can have a reddish anterior border. The second crossband consists of a series of broken dark marks. The third crossband is the bold, dark diagonal lines across the apical cells of the wings. There are some scattered red dots across the wings, mostly between the first two crossbands; there are very few if any spots before the first crossband. The costal plaque is chalky white (the bright white rectangular mark between the two crossbands, on the costal margin. Adults are 3.0-3.4 mm long, with an average of 3.2 mm. (Fairbairn, 1928)

For images of this species, see: BG.

Rare but probably overlooked due to confusion with H. balteata. Recorded from a couple counties in the Piedmont, probably more abundant in the right habitat.Has been found in mixed hardwood forest.Vitis sp., Redbud (Cercis canadensis) (3I)
Kelisia curvataThis species is similar to several other boldly marked members of the genus. It has a pale body with two prominent, thin blackish bands extending across the wings and pronotum. The face is pale.Recorded from a handful of counties in the eastern Piedmont and Coastal Plain.Grassy, sedgey areasCarex lurida (shallow sedge) (UDEL)
Kelisia vesiculataTypically a pale-colored species (similar to K. flava) but with a dark smudge to each wing tip and a pale midline extending across the vertex, thorax, and abdomen. The face is pale, and the pygofer is dark. (Bartlett & Wheeler 2007)

See here for multiple angles of a pinned specimen. See here for pics of a live individual.

Known from the mountains.Grassy, sedgey areasCarex stricta (UDEL)
Kelisia spinosaA fairly dark species with broad, uniformly dark bands covering most of the wings (about 2/3 of the wing; Bartlett & Wheeler 2007), and a pale, contrasting midline down the inner margin, extending from the vertex and thorax. The face is a pale color.

See here for pics of individuals identified as spinosa.

This species can be very locally abundant; a majority of records in NC come from the mountains.Grassy, sedgey areas; frequently encountered on grassy or heath balds in the mountains. (Bartlett & Wheeler 2007)Carex intumescens var. fernaldii, C. lucorum var. austrolucorum, C. pensylvanica (UDEL)
Kelisia axialisSee UDEL for pics of individuals identified as axialis.Recorded from the state, unclear from where exactly.Sedge, grassy areasMost species in this genus are sedge specialists and are rarely found away from the host plant. (UDEL)
Kelisia flavaThis is usually a light stramineous species without any fumose coloration, but specimens from the mountains of NC have shown a uniformly dark maculation below the eyes, on the lateral margins of the pronotum, and on the mesopleuron and apex of the wings. (Bartlett & Wheeler 2007)

See here for multiple angles of a pinned specimen.

Several records from the mountains, plus a recent probable record from the Piedmont.Grassy, sedgey areas around wetlands, such as ponds and bogs (Bartlett & Wheeler 2007).Scirpus cyperinus (wool grass), Carex bullata, Carex lurida (shallow sedge) (UDEL)
sciNamedescriptionabundancehabitatfood
Megamelus lobatusBeamer notes that this species is yellowish in color with a dark brown to blackish longitudinal stripe on either side of the dorsum in males; the lobes of the ninth abdominal segment are yellow. Females are brownish overall with darker lateral margins. Macropterous individuals have a milky elytra except for a fuscous spot near the apex of the clavus. The vertex is about twice as long as the apical width. The frons and antennal segments are brown to dark brown. Brachypterous males are 3.0 mm long while females are 3.5 mm; macropterous males are 3.5 mm long while females are 4.0 mm. (Beamer, 1955)Recorded from a couple counties in the Coastal Plain and Piedmont, probably more abundant in the right habitat; rare.Wet, wetland-like vegetated areasSpartina patens (Poaceae Eragrostideae Chloridoideae) (UDEL)
Kelisia torquataA semi-dark species with a brownish but weak longitudinal band on each wing and a pale midline extending from the vertex and thorax down the inner margin of the wings on the abdomen. The head is unmarked. (Bartlett & Wheeler 2007)

See here for multiple angles of a pinned specimen.

Known from the mountains.Grassy, sedgey areas, such as bogsCarex stricta (UDEL)
Keyflana hastaA light brown, semi-elongated species. See here for several images of a pinned specimen. Recorded from the coast, probably more abundant in the right coastal habitat.Blackrush (Juncus roemerianus; Juncaceae) (UDEL)
Curtara insularis
Ringspot Leafhopper
This species is typically a pale brown color with many small dark brown spots. Males are typically heavily irrorate with dense, fine brown speckling across the vertex and pronotum; the elytra are brownish with distinctive pale venation and milky spots scattered irregularly across the wing cells. Females are typically much longer and lighter-colored than males, being grayish to cinereous in color with small fuscous speckling across the wings and body. The crown is more than twice as wide between the eyes as the median length, and is depressed behind the anterior margin. The male subgenital plates are elongate. The female pregenital sternite has produced rounded lateral angles, with the posterior margin roundedly excavated on either side of a produced median lobe, which has a small shallow notch. Adult males are 8 mm long, females are 8.5 mm. (Caldwell & Martorell 1952, DeLong & Freytag 1976)

Nymphs are a tan color overall, with a couple indistinct brown lines longitudinally across the dorsum.

See here for additional images: BG.

A handful of records from the Piedmont and Coastal Plain; likely more abundant, especially since it is an expanding introduced species. Citrus plants
Erythroneura vagabundaA yellowish to orange species with two prominent small black spots on the middle of the wings along the commissure. There are two yellow or orange parallel submedial lines on the top of the head, with a broad white midline in between. The pronotum has a Y or V-shaped mark, though in some orange individuals the posterior portion of the pronotum can be yellow or bluish, and in other individuals the Y is not as distinct, blending in with the color on the posterior portion of the pronotum. The costal margin of the wings has a small black mark in the middle, and the wing tips are smudged with brown; there is a dark brown to black thin band that transverses the apical wing venation. The face is pale, as is the thoracic venter outside of the dark mesosternum. Adults are 2.9-3.1 mm long. (Dmitriev & Dietrich, 2007)

For more images of this species, see: BG.

Recent records from both the Piedmont and mountains; possibly more abundant in the right habitat.Has been found in mixed hardwood forest.Redbud (Cercis canadensis), Vitis sp. (3I)
Anotia bonnetiiThis species has brownish wings, with the veins outlined in brown. The lower outer margins of the wings have some red-lined veins, and there are small black spots on the apical edges. Most importantly, vein CuA is forked, dividing the wing cell into small cell C5 and larger cell C4; in some other Anotia species, the forked vein and therefore C5 are absent. Two bold dark spots, one on each wing, can be found on the inner edge near the middle. The thorax and abdomen are reddish-brown, and there are no dark markings on top of the head (separating this species from westwoodi); the side of the head also lacks markings and is whitish. (UDEL)Uncommon to scarce, recorded in several counties in the Piedmont and Coastal Plain.Has been found in open areas near mixed hardwood forest.Derbidae are known or assumed to feed on fungal hyphae as immatures (UDEL).
Texananus decorusA stubby looking member of this genus, short and robust. It is dark brownish overall, with dark brown and white mottling that gives it a checkered appearance. This species has white spots down the middle of the back. The posterior edge of the pronotum and the scutellum have more white than the rest of the body, providing a noticeable contrast from the dark marks on the wings that connect with the white dots on the back. There is also a small, pale transverse band on the head above the eyes. The legs are checkered as well. The female pregenital sternite has the lateral margins rounded; there is a broad and deep V-shaped notch in the middle, flanked with dark coloration. Male plates are short and narrow and triangular in shape. Adults are 6.0 mm long. The nymph is brownish overall with white and black marks and a very spiny abdomen. (Delong & Hershberger 1949)Recorded from a few counties in the Piedmont, probably more abundant in the right habitat.Grassy areas, fields, pastures, etc. Grasses
sciNamedescriptionabundancehabitatfood
Phylloscelis atra
Black Leaf-leg
A variable species with several different color forms, ranging from completely black to brownish overall to boldly marked with pale lines. The length of the wings can also vary among individuals, from more rounded to longer, more rectangular (above pics). The head is not projected, being short and stout in profile, and the legs are enlarged and long. In the black form at least the insides of the legs are speckled with small white spots. Nymphs are brownish overall with pale abdominal segments, pale speckling over the body, and several groups of pale hairs extending from tip of the abdomen. Recorded recently from the western Piedmont, especially on top of Pilot Mountain; possibly more abundant in the state, especially in higher elevation areas like the mountains.Has been found in grassy, brushy habitat near forest edge.Rhus copallina (winged sumac, Anacardiaceae) (UDEL)