Hoppers of North Carolina:
Spittlebugs, Leafhoppers, Treehoppers, and Planthoppers
50 most recent updates
Return Max of 200
sciNamedescriptionabundancehabitatfood
Penestragania robustaA green species (fading to yellow with age and/or in collected specimens), with many short black hairs (setae) scattered across the surface of the wings; sometimes these hairs can be pale, and there may be dark rings at the base of them. The vertex is short and broadly rounded, less wide than the pronotum. The posterior margin of the female pregenital sternite is barely excavated and is slightly bisinuate, with a small median projection. Adult males are 3.2-4.3 mm long, females are 3.6-4.7 mm. (Beamer & Lawson, 1945), (Blocker, 1970)

Nymphs have a green body, densely covered with white pubescence which grows thicker and longer as the nymph ages.

See here for more images of this species: BG.

Rare in the state (but possibly overlooked or undercollected), with records from only a single county in the Piedmont (though Blocker 1970 indicates there are other records for the state).Blocker (1970) notes multiple host plants for this species; those reported from the southeastern United States are: Axonopus compressus, Cynodon dactylon, Iva sp., Larrea tridentata glutinosa, Medicago sativa, Paspalum notatum, & Prunus augustifolia
Penestragania alabamensisA greenish to tan species, with many short whitish hairs (setae) scattered across the surface of the wings; sometimes there is a fuscous spot at the apex of the clavi (inner part of the wings) and the outer ends of the apical cells. The vertex is rounded and distinctly narrower than the pronotum. The posterior margin of the female pregenital sternite is produced on the median two thirds, sometimes with a small median notch. Fuscous spots are common in the posterior third of the anteapical cells. The posterior margin of the female pregenital sternite is produced on the median, occasionally with a small notch. Adults males are 4.0-4.7 mm long, females are 4.5-4.8 mm. (Beamer & Lawson, 1945), (Blocker, 1970)

See here for more images of this species: BG.

A single record from the mountains, likely overlooked and undercollected and could turn up anywhere in the state.Honey locust (Gleditsia triancanthos) (Blocker, 1970)
Arundanus shermaniA broad-headed species with a pale whitish marginal band on the vertex that is bordered by a narrow [sometimes] brown band underneath and a dark irregular band above; the upper band is described as being composed of three triangular spots on each side of the margin, but this broken band [based on the specimens here] looks more like a series of irregularly sized dark dashes. The vertex is broad and relatively slightly pointed at the apex; it is 1/3 wider between the eyes than at the median length. The female pregenital sternite is truncated without any excavation; it has a relatively smooth posterior margin and cleanly wraps around the base of the pygofer, distinctive for this species (DeLong 1941). Females are 5-1-5.3 mm long. Rare. Previously reported for NC, but not clear where; a couple recent records from Craven county in the Coastal Plain. This species will be found where cane is present. Moist areas where the host plant grows.Cane/native bamboo (Arundinaria tecta)
Alconeura macraA pale, creamy-white species with an orange-yellow color pattern. The vertex has an orange-yellow V-mark that is inverted from the margin; this mark touches the eyes and largely does not widen much as it extends towards the pronotum. The pronotum has four orange-yellow lines (two pairs), parallel to one another and extending across the pronotum towards the scutellum; the lateral pairs of lines are slightly connected at the anterior end and sometimes connected posteriorly. The scutellum is orange-yellow except for a small but bold anteromedian white square. There are two orange-yellow oval-shaped claval spots on each wing, one elongated mark on the side of the scutellum and the other in the middle along the commissure; when the wings are closed, the middle spots on each wing form an oval dorsal spot. There is an orange-yellow stripe that curves inward from each costal margin along the claval suture to the apical crossveins, meeting a smoky brown mark that extends from a yellowish-orange spot on the midcostal margin. The apical crossveins are yellow, bordered with dark brown; there is a bold black apical dot on the third crossvein. The wing tips are yellowish with some smoky brown tints. The underside of the body is yellowish. (Griffith, 1938)

For more images of this species, see: 3I.

Recorded from a few counties in the Coastal Plain; probably found elsewhere in the right habitat, but likely uncommon to rare.Has been found in open forest habitat near a cypress swamp.Hypericum sp. (3I)
Endria inimica
Painted Leafhopper
A distinctively marked species, somewhat dark overall in color with a bold pattern. There are a pair of aligned black spots on the margin of the head, the margin of the pronotum and the base of the scutellum (this last pair is larger than the other spots); these spots are spaced an equal distance apart from one another, and one could draw a line through the three dots on the left and the three on the right. (BG)

The nymph is also distinctively marked; it is pale overall except for a single broad dark brown stripe down each side of the thorax and abdomen.

Recorded across the state in all three regions; probably more abundant in the right habitat.Common in grasslands and other similar, grassy areas.Grasses. Has been taken on Scirpus, Medicago, Poa sp., and Vitis vinifera (DL)
Draeculacephala balliA small, short green sharpshooter with two small black triangles on its head and two small black triangles at the base of the wings, on the scutellum; these black triangles are characteristic of this species (BG). The underside and legs are brownish, with the face ranging towards a darkish brown color. Adult males are 4.8- 5.5 mm long, while females are 6.0- 6.7 mm (Young 1959).Locally common, recorded across the state with a majority of records from the Piedmont and Coastal Plain, though probably abundant throughout the state in the right habitat.Grassy, field-type habitat; has also been found on lawns.Festuca lawn grass, clover, native grasses, etc.
Chlorotettix iridescensA light brown species with dark eyes; the forewings are light brown subhyaline (can appear yellowish) with both pale and dark venation. The vertex is roundedly produced with the median length approximately twice as long as the length next to the eye. The vertex can be yellowish, with the ocelli greenish-yellow; the face is a brownish-yellow. The female pregenital sternite is broadly and deeply excavated with the sides concave and a V-shaped median notch; the lateral angles of the margin are rounded and acute. Note that because of the shape and extent of the excavation in the sternite, some of the genital structures (look like rounded lobes) are visible underneath; seeing these, combined with the shape of the sternite, are characteristic of this species. The male subgenital plates are broadly triangular and rather short, convexly rounded with bluntly angled acute apices. Adult males are 6.1-6.9 mm long, females are 6.7-7.2 mm. (DeLong 1918, DeLong 1948, Cwikla 1988)

For diagrams of the genitalia of this species, see: Dmitriev.

Recorded from a couple counties in the Piedmont and Coastal Plain; likely under collected and therefore under reported.Grassy areas, forest edge, open woodlands, floodplain forest, wet areas (DeLong 1948)Grasses, cane, violets, similar plants of wet soils (DeLong 1948)
sciNamedescriptionabundancehabitatfood
Chlorotettix attenuatusA pale yellow, yellowish-green, to light brown species with dark eyes; the forewing is yellowish subhyaline. The vertex is bluntly, angularly produced and is three-fifths longer at the middle than next to the eye. The female pregenital sternite has the posterior margin angulate, excavated to about one-half the length of the segment and bearing a short median spatulate process, which does not extend past the posterior angles. The male subgenital plates are broad at the bases and narrowed to long acute apices with slightly sinuate lateral margins; the plates are almost as long as the pygofer. Adult males are 6.5-7.1 mm long, females are 6.9-7.6 mm. (DeLong 1948, Cwikla 1988)

To view some pinned specimens, see: BOLD. For diagrams of this species, see: 3I.

A few records from the Piedmont and Coastal Plain; likely under collected and therefore under reported.Probably grassy areas, forest edge
Chlorotettix balliA yellowish-green to green to ochraceous species, with the eyes yellowish or dark; the forewings are yellowish subhyaline with indistinct venation. The vertex is angularly produced and is one half longer at the middle than near the eyes. The female pregenital sternite has a posterior deep notch extending about two-third of the way towards the anterior margin; there is a noticeable spatulate tooth in the middle of this cavity, and the lateral lobes expand outwards. The male subgenital plates are relatively broad and bluntly triangular, gradually narrowing to acute apexes; the plates are as long as the pygofer. Adult males are 6.0-6.8 mm long, females are 6.3-7.3 mm. (DeLong 1918, DeLong 1948, Cwikla 1988)

For diagrams of the genitalia of this species, see: Dmitriev. For more images of this species, see: BG.

Recorded from a few counties across the state; likely under collected and therefore under reported.Grassy areas, forest edge, open woodlands, "marshy" meadows (Cwikla 1988)Grasses?
Chlorotettix floridanusA pale yellow to brownish yellow species. The eyes are light yellow to reddish-brown, and the forewings are yellowish subhyaline. The crown is roundedly produced, with the median length only slightly longer than the length next to the eye. The female pregenital sternite has a moderately deep V-shaped excavation that extends about three-quarters of the length of the sternite; there is a very shallow notch in the middle of the bigger excavation, which has a dark brown border, and the lateral angles are triangular. The male subgenital plates are triangular, with the lateral margin slightly sinuate; the apex is rounded. Adult males are 5.4-5.9 mm long, females are 6.1-6.5 mm. (Cwikla 1988)

For additional images of pinned specimens, see: BOLD.

Recorded from sveral counties in the Coastal Plain; likely under collected and therefore under reported, should occur throughout the Coastal Plain. It has been collected across its range from April through September (Cwikla 1988).Grassy areas, fields, regenerated farmland
Draeculacephala savannahaeA tan, brownish species that has a yellowish "faded line" around the edge of the wings. The crown is marked with thin black lines and small black dots, and the scutellum has two semi-faint black triangular-shaped black spots along the anterior margin. The wing venation is pale, contrasting with the tan wings. There is a black line around the sides of the body, and the face and underside of the body are a light brown. Females have long pointed heads, while males have much shorter heads. The female pregenital sternite is moderately to strongly produced with a noticeable projection on the posterior margin. Adult males are 5.4-6.4 mm long, while females are 6.5-7.4 mm (though males may range up to 6.9 mm and females up to 7.8 mm). Uncommon, a few recent records from the Coastal Plain, probably more abundant near the coast (though this species may be a recent arrival in the state as it was previously known as far north as South Carolina). Near coastal marshesReported from a grass-vetch mixture: Eremochloa ophiuroides-Vicia sp.
Planicephalus flavicosta_flavocostatus complexA small dark leafhopper that is very highly variable in coloration, from pale to very dark. There is a small pale yellow border to the outer edge of the wings that ends in a short dash; another small white dash is found closer to the wingtip, and the wingtip itself has a white edge. There are several small white dots on the front of the head and behind the eyes. The legs are pale brown. P. flavocostatus is typically much darker overall than P. flavicosta, the latter of which typically has brownish wings. But the overlap between these species, and variations in the color of individuals makes it almost impossible to differentiate the two species by appearance alone. Nymphs are an overall brownish color with a black tip to the abdomen and several dark brown abdominal segments. (BG)A common species where recorded, this species has been found across the state in all three regions.Grassy, brushy areas
Sanctanus tectusThis species has a pale vertex with a pair of small black spots at the apex and a large pair of irregularly-shaped black spots on the disc near the ocelli; these large spots are fused with the upper black band on the frons. The face is pale with three transverse black bands and a thick pale band across the middle; the dark bands are across the apex of the clypeus, below the antennae, and below the margin of the vertex. There is also a pair of small, curved black spots on the posterior portion of the vertex. The vertex is strongly produced and angled, a little wider between the eyes at the base than the median length. The pronotum has a rectangular black spot on the anterior margin, medially, and a large irregular blackish mark behind each eye. The pronotal disc is brownish with pale margins. The basal portions of the wings are white, with a fuscous, blackish spot on the disc of each clavus and three fuscous, blackish spots on each costal margin. The wing venation is pale, margined with fuscous. The female pregenital sternite is truncate with a broad blunt median tooth. The male subgenital plates are elongate and triangular, rather broad basally tapering to narrow blunt tips. Adults are 4.0-4.5 mm long. (Oman 1934, DeLong & Hershberger 1946)Previously reported from the state (Oman 1934, DeLong & Hershberger 1946), but unclear from where. Recorded recently from the Coastal Plain; possibly more abundant in the state in the right habitat, especially in the Coastal Plain.Has been found in open habitat near mixed hardwood forest edge.Arundinaria tecta (Oman 1934)
Chlorotettix capensisA yellowish species with an orange ring around the ocellus; the forewings are yellowish subhyaline. The eye color is either yellow or red. The crown is angularly produced, with the median length slightly longer than the length next to the eye. The male subgenital plates are broadly rounded apically, not reaching the apex of the pygofer. The female pregenital sternite has the posterior margin with a broad excavation- the median of the excavation has a deep V-shaped notch, bordered with brown; the lateral angles are rounded. Adult males are 5.3-5.9 mm long, females are 5.7-6.3 mm. (Cwikla 1988)Recently recorded from a couple counties in the Sandhills, likely under collected and more abundant in the Coastal Plain. Reported to occur in Florida from June through February (Cwikla 1988). Has been found in regenerated farmland.Maiden cane (Panicum hemitomum; Cwikla 1988)
sciNamedescriptionabundancehabitatfood
Chlorotettix vacunusA pale yellow species tinged with green, with the forewing yellowish subyaline. The eyes are yellowish green or yellowish brown. The crown is roundly produced, with the median length almost twice as long as the length next to the eye. The male subgenital plates are as long as the pygofer, triangular with the lateral margin slightly convex and the apex acute. The female pregenital sternite has the posterior margin with a deep V-shaped excavation extending almost to the anterior margin; the lateral angles are roundly produced and bluntly angled. Adult males are 5.0-5.7 mm long, females are 5.7-6.4 mm. (Cwikla 1988)

For diagrams of the genitalia of this species, see: 3I.

Recorded recently from a single county in the Sandhills, likely under collected and present elsewhere, at least in the Coastal Plain. Grassy areasGrass (Cwikla 1988)
Polana quadrinotataA brownish to reddish-green leafhopper with a wide range in coloration. This species has a short broadly rounded head (compared to the similar genus Ponana) with large ocelli, which are typically quite visible as a white spot in front of the eye on the margin of the head (the ocelli are highly reflective with flash). There are four small, distinctive black spots on the head, two behind each eye; sometimes though there might be a fainter "third" dot present as well. The scutellum has the basal angles brown. The wings can vary in markings among individuals, with some having few markings while others have bold black marks scattered. The wing venation is somewhat simple but bold and conspicuous, a helpful distinguishing characteristic. Male subgenital plates are more than twice as long as the median width. The female pregenital sternite has the lateral angles produced and rounded, with the posterior margin deeply excavated with a broad v-shaped notch on either side of a central median lobe that extends almost halfway to the base; the median lobe is slightly notched at the apex. Adult males are 8 mm long, females are 8.25 mm. (DeLong & Freytag 1972)

Nymphs have a short, stout appearance with long antennae; the body color is a mixture of red, green, and brown. (BG)

Uncommon, recorded from several counties in the Piedmont and across the Coastal Plain, probably more abundant in the right habitat.Has been found in grassy, field-type habitat and forest edge.?
Polana celataA dark brown species with the crown and anterior portion of the pronotum a paler brown. The crown is short and broadly rounded. The ocelli are widely separated . The wing venation is dark brown, particularly on the corium, apical and anteapical veins; the tips of the claval veins are brown. The male subgenital plates are elongate and more than four times long as broad. The female pregenital sternite is trilobate and has the lateral angles rounded, with a shallowly excavated posterior margin on either side of broadly rounded lobes; the median lobe has a broad shallow notch. Adult males and females are 8.0 mm long (though DeLong 1942 states 6-7 mm long). (DeLong & Freytag 1962)Rare, a single collection record from the state.
Hecalus viridisA pale green species (rarely, straw-coloured) with a fine, dark line on the lower edge of the coronal margin on the vertex. The female often has pale brown lines on longitudinal wing veins. Ventrally, males have black tergites contrasting with unmarked pale green sternites. The head has the coronal margin angled; the crown of the female is parabolically rounded, as long as the midlength of the pronotum but distinctly narrower than the pronotum, whereas the head of the male is parabolically pointed and shorter than the midlength of the pronotum. The wings of the female are subbrachypterous to macropterous, exposing the ovipositor and at least the tip of the pygofers; males are macropterous. The female pregenital sternite is truncate, with a straight posterior margin. The male subgenital plates are triangular, with slightly concave lateral margins. Adult males are 4.9-5.9 mm long and have a width of 1.3-1.5 mm across the eyes, females are 6.7-7.9 mm long and have a width of 1.6-1.9 mm across the eyes. (Hamilton 2000)

For additional images of specimens of this species, see: 3I and BOLD.

Reported from the state per Metcalf, but unclear from where. Adults are reported from late April to early October, with nymphs present from late July to late August; probably two broods of nymphs (Hamilton 2000). Grassy areasVarious grasses, usually on Elymus spp. and Agropyron spp., but also collected from Aristida spp., Hesperostipa spartea, Hesperostipa comata, Panicum virgatum, and Andropogon scoparius (Hamilton 2000).
Chlorotettix aurumA yellowish species with yellowish subhyaline forewings. The crown is roundedly produced, with the median length slightly longer in the middle than next to the eyes. The male subgenital plates are broad at the base and narrowed at the apex, being almost as long as the pygofer. The female pregenital sternite has the posterior margin rounded with a very deep, parallel-sided excavation in the middle which almost reaches the anterior margin. Adult males are 6.3-7.0 mm long, while females are 6.5-7.5 mm. (Cwikla 1988)

Additional pinned specimens can be seen here: BOLD.

Uncommon with scattered records across the state, primarily from the Coastal Plain; likely under collected and therefore under reported.Probably grassy areas, forest edge
Empoa saffranaA yellowish species with the basal two-thirds of the wings unmarked; in teneral specimens, the wings are ivory-white. The apex of the wings have four or more dark brown spots around the apical crossveins; these spots, together with the yellow wings, distinguish this species from others. In some individuals, the spots may not be as bold, but together they form an arced 'band' along the apical crossveins. The wingtips are largely hyaline. (Hamilton, 1983)Recorded from a few counties in the mountains and Piedmont, likely more abundant in the right habitat. Has been found near mixed hardwood forest. Reported from Hop-hornbeam (Ostrya virginiana), beech (Fagus grandifolia), American elm (Ulmus americana), Ulmus sp. (Hamilton 1983)
Scaphytopius scriptusThis dark brown species can be distinguished by its short crown with small markings and heavily marked forewings. The face is irrorate with dark brown and has a relatively long sharksmouth pale mark, with pale markings also behind the eyes and at the ocelli and antennae. The crown is brown to fuscous in males, fulvous in females, with a white apical longitudinal mark, a white one along the margin next to each eye, and a pair of discal white spots and small white spots at the base. The pronotum is marked with five longitudinal vittae, and the scutellum has white spots on the disc and tan basal angles. The elytra are irrorate with brown, veins are brown, and pale areas throughout; there are round white areolar spots on the apical portion of the wing and numerous brown costal veinlets. In females, the fuscous area in cells is restricted to the outer anteapical cell and adjoining area of the costa. The vertex is short, about three-fourths as wide between the eyes at the base as the median length. The male subgenital plates are broad at the bases, with narrow rounded apices. The female pregenital sternite has the posterior margin evenly rounded to a small median lobe. Adults are 4 mm long. (Hepner 1947, DeLong 1948)

To see some images of pinned specimens, see: BOLD.

Recorded from the state, but unclear from where.
sciNamedescriptionabundancehabitatfood
Scaphytopius angustatusA very distinctive species, orange and green. The head is a grass-green color, largely without any markings; the face is also green. The pronotum, scutellum, and wings are rufuous-brown, with some greenish tints; in some individuals though, the pronotum is grayish. The dark wing veins, black marks, and white areolar spots are restricted to the apical third of the wings (in the apical and anteapical cells, and along the costa); the other 2/3 are without marks. The male subgenital plates are short with narrow, rounded apexes. The female pregenital sternite is around one and one-half times as wide as the length at the middle; the posterior margin is rounded to a small lobe on either side of a median notch. Adult males are around 4.0 mm long, females are around 5.0 mm. (DeLong 1948), (Hepner 1947)

For diagrams of this species, see: Zahniser.

A single record from Pilot Mountain in the western Piedmont; possibly more abundant in the right habitat.Has been found in higher elevation grassy, brushy habitat near forest edge.Reported from pine in coniferous forests (DeLong 1948); from pitch pine, jack pine, and red pine in northern parts of its range (Hepner 1947)
Scaphytopius argutusA fulvous to brown and greenish species. The crown is described as fulvous, sometimes darkest on the disc with a thin light line along the anterior margin, long arcuate light vitta on either side of the median suture, and usually two pairs of light, large dots along the posterior margin of the crown. The pronotum is usually darker than the crown, with reddish-brown basal triangles; vittae are usually faintly indicated. The scutellum is about the same color as the crown. The face is yellow to fulvous. The forewings are opaque fulvous to reddish-fulvous with white aeroles at the apex of the clavus and corium; the veins are fuscous. The male subgenital plates are triangular and shorter than the pygofers, gradually sloping to bluntly pointed apices. The female pregenital sternite is roundedly produced on the posterior margin. Adult males are 4.5 mm long, females are 5 mm. This species however can vary a great deal in size and color and even genitalia; the distinctive characters include the brownish, almost opaque wings and the fulvous face (Hepner 1947, DeLong 1948). Some individuals have a yellowish-green to greenish crown and face.

For additional images of this species, see: BG. For images of three pinned specimens showcasing the range in variation in coloration, see: BOLD.

Nymphs are greenish-yellow with a broken whitish midline, symmetrical white spots across the abdominal segments, and a long head.

One record from the mountains.?
Scaphytopius collarisA brownish species with the crown ivory to light fulvous; wedge and arcuate markings on the disc are often indicated. The pronotum is brown to black except for a yellow to fulvous area on each lateral margin, with slender median vitta and dots across the pronotum. The scutellum has the basal half dark brown to black and the apical half yellow to fulvous. The face is entirely yellow to fulvous and lacks irrorations. The forewings are translucent pale fulvous to dark brown, with the veins brown on the apex and costal area; there are pale areoles along the apical crossveins. The crown is about one and one-third times as long as the width between the eyes, with the anterior margin straight to slightly convex on either side of a bluntly pointed apex. The female pregenital sternite has the posterior margin rounded to a small median lobe. Adult males are 4.8 mm long, females are 5.3 mm. (Hepner 1947, DeLong 1948)Recorded from the state, but unclear from where.Vaccinium sp. (Hepner 1947)
Micrutalis malleifera
Pseudo-Curly Top Treehopper
A variably colored species. Some individuals resemble M. calva, with black across most of the pronotum except for a pale tip. Other individuals however are quite distinctive, with a broad white border around the black part of the pronotum and some orange marks present as well. Adults are 2.8-3.6 mm long. See FSCA for more information.Rare, only recorded from Dare county in the Coastal Plain.CoastalNightshade (Physalis spp.; CTNC); in FL, also recorded from Lycopersicum esculentum and Solanum spp. (FSCA)
Limotettix angustatusGreenish yellow to brownish, an overall dark species. The vertex is broadly rounded, more than twice as wide between the eyes as the median length. There are irregular blackish markings covering most of the vertex; the pronotum and scutellum are also mostly dark. The wing nervures are pale, bordered with fuscous coloration; the wings are a dark smoky subhyaline. The female pregenital sternite is almost truncate on the posterior margin, with a near-straight posterior margin; the lateral angles very blunt. The male subgenital plates are triangular and slightly concave on the apical halves, with the apices acutely pointed. Adults are 4 mm long. (DeLong 1948)

For diagrams of this species including the thoracic and head pattern, see: 3I. For images of some pinned specimens, see: BOLD.

Recorded from the state, but unclear from where.Found in bogs (Hamilton 1994)Rushes and sedges (Chandler & Hamilton 2017)
Limotettix cuneatusA small greenish-yellow species. The vertex is almost parallel margined, slightly and roundedly produced with a bold, thick black transverse band between the eyes, behind the ocelli. The wings are noticeably longer than the abdomen and are a smoky subhyaline color with yellowish nervures. The female pregenital sternite has prominent lateral angles, with the posterior margin strongly produced on either side of a dark median obtuse tooth. The male subgenital plates are long, tapering gradually to acute tips. Adults are 3.0-3.5 mm long. (DeLong 1948)

For diagrams of this species, including the vertex pattern, see: 3I. For images of specimens of this species, see: BOLD.

Recorded from the state, but unclear from where.Has been collected from lagoon margins, boggy areas, wet meadows, swamps, and wet pastures (Chandler & Hamilton 2017).Flatsedge (Cyperus spp.) and rushes (Juncus spp.; DeLong 1948, Chandler & Hamilton 2017)
Endria micariaA pale brownish yellow species, with the vertex mottled with orange; the margins and posterior areas of the vertex are light. The reflexed arcs of the face, ocelli, a pair of spots near the ivory apex, and a spot on either side of the vertex midway to the ocellus are black. The face is otherwise brown with pale arcs. The pronotum is olive with five thin, light longitudinal stripes. The wing have the nervures margined with brown and fuscous, and the cells are often washed with dull orange. The vertex is almost twice as long at the apex as against the eye, longer in the middle than the width between the eyes and as long as the pronotum. The pronotum is strongly arcuate in the front and has the side margins almost obsolete. The wings are long, often flaring. The female pregenital sternite has the lateral angles broadly rounded to the posterior margin, which is slightly concave either side of a broad median tooth; the lateral lobes are prominent at the side of the sternite. The male subgenital plates are as wide as the valve and the last ventral segment, gradually narrowing to rather broad, blunt apices. Adults are 3.5 mm long. (DeLong 1926)Recorded from the state but unclear from where (DeLong 1926); probably found in the Coastal Plain.In Florida, collected from prairies, dry areas where water receded into marsh, and grassy areas in pinelands. (DeLong 1926)Desert saltgrass (Distichlis spicata), Dichromena floridensis, Rhynchospora divergens (DeLong 1926)
sciNamedescriptionabundancehabitatfood
Lycorma delicatula
Spotted Lanternfly
A distinctive, large species, unlike anything else in our area. Adults have forewings that are pinkish-gray with bold black spots across the basal 2/3; the apical 1/3 of the wings are blackish with contrasting white wing venation, forming small black blocks. The forewings are a bold mixture of red and black with a diagonal white band. The antennal bases are orange. The legs and underside of the body are blackish-gray, with yellowish margins to the abdominal segments and [sometimes] a red tip to the abdomen. Adults are approximately 1 inch (~25 mm) long and 0.5 inches (~13 mm) wide. (NCDA&CS)

The first three nymphal instars are black with scattered white spots. The fourth instar is largely red with black and white markings. Here is an image showing the full life cycle.

Egg masses are brownish and can sometimes be covered with a grayish waxy layer, giving a mud-like appearance.

Two records from the mountains from two different counties so far- this species is not yet established in North Carolina. Orchards, vineyards, residential areas, etc.Tree of heaven (Ailanthus altissima) is the primary host plant; also likes grape. When numbers are higher, individuals move to red and silver maple. However, this species is known to feed on 103 plant species, of which 56 are present in North America. (ET, UDEL)

For lists of various host plant species, see the information at the bottom of this page: UDEL.

Crumbana arundineaThe vertex is creamy, with a pair of black triangular spots near the apex and one on each side of the eyes. There is a pair of large irregular, fuscous to orange-colored spots that form a somewhat broken band between the anterior margins of the eyes; these fuscous spots, contrasting with the smaller black spots along the vertex margin, are characteristic of this species. There is also a pair of oblique fuscous dashes on the base of the vertex. The pronotum is fuscous with five somewhat indistinct pale longitudinal bands (this tends to result in there being four orange longitudinal bands); there is an irregular dark spot behind each eye, along the anterior margin. The scutellum has a spot at the apex (not always present) and a dark spot in each basal angle. The wings are fuscous, with the nervures and venation a contrasting whitish color, margined with fuscous. There are three conspicuous dark, blackish spots on each wing (elytron): one on the middle of the clavus, one on the middle of the costal margin, and the other on the outer (lower) apical cell along the costa. There is a large pale area between the two dark spots along the costal margin, resulting in a fuscous arc of cells connecting each dot. The face is pale with fucous markings and heavy dark arcs. The vertex is bluntly produced, long and coming to a defined pointed apex, almost one-fourth longer in the middle than the width between the eyes. The female pregenital sternite is three times as long as the preceeding sternite, with the posterior margin trilobate. The lateral angles are roundingly produced in definite lobes, between which is a broadly rounded shorter median lobe; there is a distinctly rounded notch on either side of this lobe. The male subgenital plates are long, exceeding the valve by more than twice its length; the plates are concavely narrowed (outer margin) and produced into long acute tips. Adults are around 3.5 mm long. (DeLong 1926, DeLong 1946)

For diagrams of the genitalia of this species, see: 3I. For an image of a pinned specimen, see: BG.

A locally common species throughout the Coastal Plain; likely found throughout this region and perhaps the eastern part of the Piedmont. Has been found in open habitat near mixed hardwood forest edge; also stream-side habitat where cane is present (DeLong 1948).Switchcane (Arundinaria tecta;
Kybos obtusaA green, broad-headed species without definite markings. The vertex is produced on the middle half beyond the anterior margin of the eyes and is more than twice as wide between the eyes as the length in the middle. The vertex is frequently tinged with yellow, and the pronotum and scutellum usually have a central pale stripe and other irregular light markings. The wings are greenish subhyaline, with the abdomen visible through them; the tips are slightly smoky hyaline, and there is often a fine black line along the elytral suture. The legs are green, with the tarsal joints fuscous. The female pregenital sternite is long, produced to a blunt, rounded apex. The male subgenital plates are more than three times as long as the basal width, tapered to curled narrow tips with dense long pale spines. Adults are 3.6-4.5 mm long. (DeLong 1916, DeLong 1931, Fegley 1989)One record from Transylvania County.Poplar (mostly Eastern Cottonwood, Populus deltoides, but also other Populus sp.) and willow (Salix sp.) (3i)
Arundanus sarissusThis species resembles A. latidens in general appearance but has the upper brown band on the vertex margin more broken and uneven. Adults are orange-yellow with a white vertex margin, bordered below by a black band and above by a brown band that is formed from three contiguous dark spots that are elongated; the central pair of spots are the largest. The vertex is bluntly angled, 1/3 times wider between the eyes than the median length. The female pregenital sternite appears truncated, with the posterior margin "roundedly excavated, the central portion of which is filled to the distance of the lateral angles with what appears to be an underlying membrane." This membrane underneath the sternite may, at the right angle or lighting, make the posterior margin of the sternite appear barely excavated and instead as if it largely extends straight across the base of the pygofer. The male subgenital plates are tapered to bluntly pointed apexes, appearing long and triangular. Adults are around 4.5-5.0 mm long, with females noticeably larger than males. (DeLong 1941)Historically known from a single county in the Coastal Plain, now a couple recent records in the Sandhills; likely more abundant in the right habitat.Moist areas where the host plant grows.Cane/native bamboo (Arundinaria tecta)
Arundanus rubralineusA species with a distinctive coloration and a broad, bluntly angled vertex that is about 1/4 wider between the eyes than the median length. The margin of the vertex usually lacks dark or white bands and is typically without dark markings; occasionally there is a black line on the margin. The vertex is only marked by a pair of broad longitudinal orange stripes, with two faint dark spots near the vertex tip inside the orange bands; these orange bands extends onto the pronotum, with a couple more smaller orange bands on either side. The female pregenital sternite is truncated/emarginate with a narrow incision in the middle that extends 2/3 of the way to the anterior margin. The male genital plates have broad bluntly rounded apexes that are divergent from one another. Adults are around 5.0 mm long. (DeLong 1941)A couple records from the Coastal Plain; likely more abundant in the right habitat.Moist areas where the host plant grows.Cane/native bamboo (Arundinaria tecta)
Chlorotettix tergatusThis species is ochraceous greenish yellow in color, with the forewings brownish subhyaline. The eyes are [usually] dark, and the crown is roundly produced, being slightly longer in the middle than near the eyes. The male subgenital plates are large and broad, with the sides slightly sinuated; the apices are broad, obtuse, and rounded, not pointed like in many other species, giving each plate a trapezoidal appearance. The female pregenital sternite is long, with a broad V-shaped excavation extending half way on the posterior margin toward the base (there does seem to be some slight variation in the shape of the excavation across specimens); the lateral lobes are rounded, and the margin of the excavation is brown. Adult males are 7.1-7.9 mm long, females are 7.3-8.3 mm. (DeLong 1918, DeLong 1948, Cwikla 1988)

For diagrams of the genitalia of this species, see: Dmitriev. For additional images of a male with dissected genitalia, see: BG.

A widespread species, recorded across the Piedmont and Coastal Plain; likely more abundant in the right habitat.Sedgy meadows and other grassy, brushy areas; open woodlands, forest edgeCut-rice grass (Leersia oryzoides), tall coarse grass and sedge association
Scaphytopius elegansA very distinctive and stunning species. Adults are a reddish-brown (though this color can vary among individuals) with a pale, yellowish broad midline patch that extends from the head down the middle of the wings. There are two bold black marks at the rear of the wings; there are also some pale white spots scattered on the wings. There is a white transverse band with a black border between each eye, on the edge of the head. The vertex itself is blunt, not sharply pointed, and is almost twice as long as the width between the eyes. The face is pale, sometimes yellow. The female pregenital sternite is broadly and roundedly produced on the posterior margin. Male subgenital plates are triangular and strongly divergent from one another. Adults are 4.5-5.0 mm long, with females longer than males. (DeLong 1948)

For diagrams of this species, see: Zahniser.

Nymphs are similarly colored to the adults, with a noticeable yellow, broken middorsal stripe down the length of the body. The sides of the abdomen, thorax, and vertex are reddish-orange.

Recorded recently from a couple counties in the Piedmont and Coastal Plain; very uncommon to rare, possibly more abundant in the right habitat.Has been found in open habitat near brush/pines.Quercus spp., in particular live oak (Q. virginiana) (Hepner 1947)
sciNamedescriptionabundancehabitatfood
Neocoelidia tuberculataA greenish to yellowish-green species with a distinctive, characteristic dark stripe down the wings along the commissure. The head is pointed, visible from above, and there is a distinct angle to the face near the mouth (visible from the side) (BG). The eyes are typically a bold yellow color. This species also has very long antennae, about the same length as the wings. The female pregenital sternite is broadly, roundedly produced with a slight median notch in the posterior margin. Adults are 6.0-7.0 mm long. (DeLong 1953)

Nymphs are greenish overall with a pointed head, resembling the adult.

A fairly uncommon species with scattered records across the state, primarily in the Coastal Plain; likely more abundant in the state in the right habitat.Has been found in grassy, brushy areas, as well as pine and mixed hardwood forest.Pines (BG)
Flexamia clayiBrownish overall. The face is brown to black above, usually shading gradually to paler below. The crown is variably produced, with the length 1.44 x the interocular width and 0.71 x the head width. The female pregenital sternite has concave indents on the side of a prominent, convex median projection; there is a small median notch in this projection, with dark coloration on either side. The male genital plates are prominently divergent apically, with outer margins widened at the midlength. Adult males are 3.3-4.0 mm long, females are 3.1-3.8 mm. (Whitcomb & Hicks 1988)According to Whitcomb & Hicks 1988, has been recorded from the Piedmont and mountains; probably under collected and more abundant in the right habitat.Grassy areasBroomsedge (Andropogon virginicus), little bluestem (Schizachyrium scoparium) (Whitcomb & Hicks 1988)
Chlorotettix lusoriusA dark brown, rusty-colored species with contrasting pale wing venation. The crown is roundedly pointed, and there may be some small thin, transverse lines on the crown. The wings are long and greatly extend past the tip of the abdomen. The male subgenital plates are large and have thickened bases with curved, strongly diverging tips; there are scattered hairs on the sides. The female pregenital sternite is somewhat trilobate, with a prominent median projection; the sternite is colored dark brown around this median tooth. Adults are 7.0-8.0 mm long. (DeLong 1918)

For diagrams of the genitalia of this species, see: Dmitriev. For more pics of this species, see: BG.

Recorded from a single county in the mountainsWoodlands?
Chlorotettix spatulatusTypically a uniform green color with some yellowish tinge, this species can vary greatly in coloration and be reddish-orange. The vertex has margins that are parallel or slightly longer in the middle than next to the eyes; the vertex is two and a half times wider than it is long, giving the head a pointed shape. The wings are subyhaline in color typically, with indistinct venation. The posterior margin of the female pregenital sternite is broadly notched more than half way to the base; there is a spatulate process in the middle of this excavation that extends two-thirds the length of the notch. The lateral posterior margins of the sternite are triangular. The male plates are broad at the bases and acutely pointed. Adults are around 7.0 mm long. (DeLong 1948), (DeLong 1918)

Nymphs tend to be reddish in color. For diagrams of the genitalia of this species, see: Dmitriev.

Recorded from two counties in the Piedmont and Coastal Plain; likely under collected and therefore under reported.Moist grassy areas, meadows, marshes (DeLong 1948)
Rugosana querciA distinctive looking greenish leafhopper that is about 9-10 mm long. The heavily patterned wings with dense reticulations are characteristic of Rugosana, helping separate this species from eastern Gyponana. The green elytra (forewings), pronotum, and vertex (top of the head) are roughened with whitish mottling, and the vertex itself has a rounded margin, almost twice as wide as long. The pronotum has a conspicuous small black dot on each side, and there is a small black dot at the base of each forewing, near the pronotum. The eyes are also typically red, but can be pale green. The female pregenital sternite is almost truncate on the posterior margin, with a median block-shaped excavation about one-half the distance to the base (though this length can vary). Adult males are 9 mm long, females are 10 mm. (DeLong 1948, Freytag 1964)

Nymphs are distinctive, having a hairy, green body with mottling like the adults (these two characteristics can help separate this nymph from other Gyponini nymphs). (BG)

A somewhat uncommon species, recorded across the state from mountains to coast; when found, usually occurs in low densities.Has been in mixed hardwood forest and forest edge habitat, as well as open woodlands.Oak (Quercus spp.)
Kyboasca splendidaA stunning species with a distinct, unique pattern. Greenish overall with two bold blue stripes on the wings along the claval suture that are connected with a lateral blue band across the pronotum; when viewed from above, these blue lines form an elongated triangle. Some boldly marked individuals have orange bands bordering either side of the blue stripes on the wings. There is an orange mark on the anterior border of the blue pronotal stripe. There is a blue mark across much of the vertex. The wing tips have a dusky tint. The underside of the body and legs are green. Males are more brightly colored than females.Recorded from a few counties in the Piedmont and mountains; possibly more abundant in the right habitat.Has been found near mixed hardwood forest habitat.Alders (Alnus sp.), Alnus incana, Alnus rugosa (3I)
Hebata erigeronThe dorsum is a pale green or yellow color with few symmetrical cream-colored markings on the head and thorax. The vertex usually has a pale median stripe and pale, curved parenthesis mark on either side. The pronotum has three large white spots on the anterior margin, one in the middle and one behind each eye; otherwise the pronotum is yellowish-green. The scutellum has a pale midline. The face is pale, without any dark spots. The pronotum lacks and dark markings. The wings lack any spots. The male subgenital plates are long, slender and pointed, diverging outwards from one another. The female pregenital sternite has the posterior margin roundedly produced. Adults are around 3.0 mm long. (DeLong, 1931, 3I)

For additional images of this species, see: BG.

Recorded from a couple counties in the Coastal Plain; probably more abundant in the right habitat. Has been found in field type habitat.Recorded in the state from Ipomoea batatas (sweet potato) and Spartina cynosuroides (big cordgrass); also reported from Solidago sp., Vicia sp., Chamaemelum sp., Medicago polymorpha, Ambrosia sp., Medicago sativa, Medicago polymorpha, Ambrosia artemisifolia, and Salix sp., among others (3I)
sciNamedescriptionabundancehabitatfood
Hebata bifurcataA bright green species with a golden-yellow head that is mottled with paler yellow around the ocelli. The pronotum is greenish with golden-yellow coloration; there are three large white spots on the anterior margin, one in the middle and one behind each eye. The scutellum has a broad central white longitudinal band. The face is pale, without any dark spots. The wings lack any spots and are a bright green color; the apices are not colored and the venation is green. The male subgenital plates are long, slender and pointed; they are slightly divergent from one another and curve backwards near the apices, unique for and characteristic of this species. The female pregenital sternite is rectangular, being wider than it is long; there is a very slight median projection. Adults are 3.2-3.5 mm long. (DeLong, 1931, 3I)

For additional images of this species, see: BG.

Recorded from several counties in the Coastal Plain and Piedmont; probably more abundant in the right habitat.Agricultural fields, field-type habitatsHas been recorded in the state from Ipomoea batatas (sweet potato), Symphyotrichum subulatum (eastern annual saltmarsh aster), Vicia sp, Melilotus sp. (vetch, sweetclover), and Dahlia sp.; also known from Medicago polymorpha, Medicago sativa, Trifolium repens, Aster sp., and others (3I)
Hebata recurvataThe dorsum is a green color; there are few symmetrical cream-colored markings on the head and thorax. The face is pale, without any dark spots. The pronotum lacks any dark markings and has three white spots, which may sometimes be fused, along the anterior margin. The vertex is strongly rounded and bulbous; it has a pair of pale green spots near the margin. The wings lack any spots and are yellowish-green. The male subgenital plates are long and slender with acute, upturned apices. Adults are around 2.75 mm long. (DeLong, 1931)Recorded from a couple counties in the mountains and coastal plain; likely more abundant in the right habitat.Agricultural fields, field-type habitatHas been recorded in the state from sweet potata (Ipomoea batatas); also known from Lonicera japonica, Toxicodendron radicans, Aesculus sp., and Pilea pumila, among others (3I)
Hebata fabalisThe dorsum is a pale green or yellow color; there are few symmetrical cream-colored markings on the head and thorax. The crown lacks round spots. The face is pale, without any dark spots. The pronotum lacks and dark markings. The wings lack any spots. The male subgenital plates have a wide base before narrowing about halfway and tapering; they are divergent from one another. The male subgenital plates are long, slender and narrow, strongly diverging from one another. The female pregenital sternite is rectangular, with a largely straight posterior margin. (3I)Recorded from a single county in the Coastal Plain; likely more abundant in the right habitat.Agricultural fieldsRecorded in the state from sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas); also recorded from Gossypium sp. (cotton), Lonicera japonica, Zea mays, Ipomoea acuminata, Ipomoea crassicaulis, Ipomoea rubra, Ipomoea tiliacea, Solanum tuberosum (potato), among others (3I)
Hebata delongiThe dorsum is a pale green or yellow color with few symmetrical cream-colored markings on the head and thorax. The crown lacks any pale spots. The face is pale, without any dark spots. The pronotum lacks and dark markings. The wings lack any spots. The male subgenital plates are pointed and divergent from one another. (3I)Recorded from a single county in the coastal plain; likely under collected and more abundant in the right habitat.Dogfennel (Eupatorium capillifolium), Eastern annual saltmarsh aster (Symphyotrichum subulatum), Lonicera japonica, Aesculus sp., Urtica sp. (3I)
Coccineasca coccineaA green to reddish species, with the body varying from dull green to bright red; when green, there is typically a reddish tint. The crown lacks any pale spots. The face is pale, without any dark spots. The pronotum lacks any dark markings. The head is roundedly produced and bulbous, without any noticeable projection. The wings lack any dark markings and were greenish or smoky sybhyaline. The legs are green. The male subgenital plates are broad at the base but taper to pointed acute apices; they are slender. The female pregenital sternite has the posterior margin broadly and roundedly produced; it is more than twice as long as the previous segment. Adults are around 3.0-3.2 mm long. (DeLong, 1931)

For more images of this species, see: BG, BOLD.

Recorded from a single county in the upper Piedmont though likely more abundant in the right habitat.Has been found in mid elevation, pine to mixed hardwood forest.Eastern white pine (Pinus strobus), Pinus sp. (3I)
Hebata alboneuraA robust, yellowish-green (tinged with orange) to dull-green (tinged with brown) species that has pale wing venation; this gives the species a striped appearance. The crown is relatively broad and bluntly rounded, with a median stripe that has an oblique pale dash on either side, near the eye. The posterior margin of the female pregenital sternite is produced and rounded medially, with a shallow but broad lateral emargination. Adults are 2.5-3.5 mm long. (Wheeler, 1940)Previously recorded from the state, though unclear from where; one recent record from the Piedmont.Alfalfa (Medicago sativa), Erigeron sp., Trifolium repens, Anthemis cotula, Artemisia sp., Chrysothamnus sp., Vicia sp. (3I)
Omolicna mcateeiA fairly uniformly colored species, with a rich fulvous body color. The wings are largely washed with orange, though there may be some grayish-blue mixed in, particularly closer to the tips. The wing tips have a pink margin. This is a somewhat medium-sized species, noted in Halbert et al. (2014 as being 3.5-4.0 mm long; however, per individuals on here, this species can also be noticeably larger and range up to around 5.5 mm.

For more images of this species nicely showing the orange coloration of the body and wings, see: BG.

Previously recorded from North Carolina, but unclear from where (UDEL). Recently recorded from several counties in the Coastal Plain, probably more abundant along the coast. Has been found in open, coastal pine habitat.Physalis spp. (groundcherry) (UDEL)
sciNamedescriptionabundancehabitatfood
Omolicna fulvaA fairly uniformly colored species, with a pinkish body. The wings are grayish-blue, amplified in some individuals by the waxy coating on the wings. The wing tips have a pink margin. This is a somewhat large species, ranging around 6.5 mm. (Halbert et al. 2014)Primarily recorded in the Coastal Plain, where it can be locally abundant; found as far west as the central Piedmont. Has been found in open, coastal pine habitats and forest edge; also found near mixed hardwood forest.?