Hoppers of North Carolina:
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CICADELLIDAE Members: NC Records

Xerophloea viridis - No Common Name



© Kyle Kittelberger- male

© Kyle Kittelberger- female

© Kyle Kittelberger- female
Taxonomy
Family: CICADELLIDAESubfamily: LedrinaeTribe: XerophloeiniSynonym: Xerophloea minor
Taxonomic Author: (Fabricius, 1794)
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: A distinctive, greenish species with heavy pits all over the body and a flattened head. This is the smallest member of this genus with a shorter head than most other Xerophloea. The pronotum is about twice as long as the length of the head. Males have black and gray on much of the pronotum, a black longitudinal line on the head, and some black marks down the center of the back. Females are entirely green. The head profile is horizontal, with the head held straight out rather than slowing downwards. Adult males are 5.1-5.9 mm long, females are 5.7-6.3 mm. (Nielson, 1961)

Some individuals can be a vibrant pink color; this seems to be a very uncommon color form among species of Xerophloea.

Nymphs are green, showing the characteristic head shape of the adults. Young instars can have some sparse black speckling on the body, only to seemingly lose this in the fourth instar and then regain it more boldly in the fifth instar. For a nice set of images showing the progression from third instar to adult, see: BG.

Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Distribution: Common and widespread in the southern and eastern United States, as far north as the mid-Atlantic states in the East and as far west as southeastern California in the west, and ranges south into southern South America (Nielson, 1961)
Abundance: Scattered records across the state, primiarly in the eastern Piedmont and Coastal Plain where it is uncommon; probably more abundant in the right habitat.
Seasonal Occurrence
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Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Has been found in grassy, field-type areas near forest.
Plant Associates: Recorded from Gossypium sp. (DL)
Behavior: Can be attracted at night with a light, though usually found during the day.
Comment: This species is sometimes referred to as X. minor. In his 1975 revision of the genus, A. Hamilton stated that the name X. viridis applies to several species of the genus (or variants of the true viridis) found in Central America and the Carribean. In the western and central United States, X. viridis is replaced by X. peltata, which has a longer head and differently-shaped pronotum.
Status: Native
Global and State Rank:

Species Photo Gallery for Xerophloea viridis No Common Name

Photo by: Erich Hofmann and Kayla Weinfurther
New Hanover Co.
Comment: Found recently captured in spider web.
Photo by: Erich Hofmann and Kayla Weinfurther
New Hanover Co.
Comment: Found recently captured in spider web.
Photo by: Erich Hofmann and Kayla Weinfurther
New Hanover Co.
Comment: attracted to outdoor building lights
Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: 5.7 mm, sitting on cement ledge at forest edge
Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: 5.7 mm, sitting on cement ledge at forest edge
Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: 5.7 mm, sitting on cement ledge at forest edge
Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: 5.7 mm, sitting on cement ledge at forest edge
Photo by: Margarita Lankford
Orange Co.
Comment: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/55446155
Photo by: Rob Van Epps
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: Caught sweeping in a weedy field.
Photo by: Rob Van Epps
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: Caught sweeping in a weedy field.
Photo by: Rob Van Epps
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: Caught sweeping in a weedy field.
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
New Hanover Co.
Comment: near a marsh; male
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Cumberland Co.
Comment: female
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Cumberland Co.
Comment: female
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Cumberland Co.
Comment: female
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Washington Co.
Comment: open forest habitat; female
Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: Caught sweeping cut grass
Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: Caught sweeping cut grass
Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: Caught sweeping cut grass