Hoppers of North Carolina:
Spittlebugs, Leafhoppers, Treehoppers, and Planthoppers
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DELPHACIDAE Members: NC Records

Falcotoya sagae - No Common Name



© Kyle Kittelberger- side view; female

© Kyle Kittelberger- top view; female

© Charles Bartlett- male; note pale first
antennal segment

© Charles Bartlett- male
Taxonomy
Family: DELPHACIDAESubfamily: DelphacinaeSynonym: Delphacodes sagae
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: A very dark species, characteristic of members of this genus. Falcotoya tend to have prominent carinae (ridges) on the thorax and head, while the aedeagus is strongly downcurved (UDEL). The key characteristic for this species that can separate it from other similarly dark Delphacids is the light, non-dark first antennal segment; the first antennal segment is concolorous with the other segments. The legs are also pale, contrasting with the blackish body. The wings can have a brownish tint to them as well.

Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Distribution: Eastern United States and Ontario; C. Bartlett notes that this species is "uncommon at best, if not outright rare" (pers. comment). (UDEL)
Abundance: Rare, recorded from a single county in the Piedmont.
Seasonal Occurrence
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Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Has been found in grassy, field-type habitat
Plant Associates: Unknown, likely sedge or grass
Behavior:
Comment: The only member of this genus found in the United States. This species was until recently referred to as Delphacodes sagae and therefore closely resembles species in that genus.
Status: Native
Global and State Rank:

Species Photo Gallery for Falcotoya sagae No Common Name

Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Vance Co.
Comment: grassy, field-type habitat and mixed forest edge; female. An uncommon to rare species, maybe first for NC. Note dark color and non-dark first antennal segment
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Vance Co.
Comment: grassy, field-type habitat and mixed forest edge; female. An uncommon to rare species, maybe first for NC. Note dark color and non-dark first antennal segment