Hoppers of North Carolina:
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DELPHACIDAE Members: NC Records

Javesella pellucida - No Common Name



© Kyle Kittelberger- male

© Kyle Kittelberger- male

© Kyle Kittelberger- female

© Kyle Kittelberger- frons
Taxonomy
Family: DELPHACIDAESubfamily: Delphacinae
Taxonomic Author: (Fabricius, 1794)
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: A brown species that tends to be quite variable in color. Both brachypterous and macropterous forms occur, though it seems that the latter is more common. Males are much darker than females, ranging closer to black. Some males have a black thorax with a white ring around the base, similar to Delphacodes puella but lacking the black spot on the wings. Males can have very black faces with pale carinae. Note in males the strongly decurved aedeagus, characteristic of this species. Females are light brown overall with a dark frons and pale ridges on the thorax.
Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Distribution: Widespread and common: holarctic. In the New World, reported from Alaska, throughout Canada, and widespread in the United States, especially the northern states; also reported from Cuba and Puerto Rico. In the Palearctic, found from northern Europe to Northern Africa east to Mongolia and Japan. (UDEL)
Abundance: Scattered records across the Piedmont and Coastal Plain where it is uncommon; this species should be found though in the mountains.
Seasonal Occurrence
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Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Has been found in grassy, brushy areas and forest edge.
Plant Associates: Polyphagous, mostly grasses (Festuca, Elymus, Dactylis, Poa, Deschampsia, Agrostis, Lolium, Calamagrostis, Phleum, and others); less commonly on sedges, rushes, and horsetails. (UDEL)
Behavior: Can be attracted at night with a light.
Comment: J. pellucida is economically important for barley, maize, oats, tall oat-grass, and wheat; it is a vector of Oat sterile dwarf virus (OSDV) and European wheat striate mosaic virus (EWSMV), as well as Maize rough dwarf virus (MRDV). (UDEL)
Status: Native
Global and State Rank:

Species Photo Gallery for Javesella pellucida No Common Name

Photo by: Margarita Lankford
Orange Co.
Comment: crabgrass lawn
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Vance Co.
Comment: Field/forest edge habitat
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Surry Co.
Comment: grassy, brushy habitat near forest edge & forest; males
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Surry Co.
Comment: grassy, brushy habitat near forest edge & forest; males
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Surry Co.
Comment: grassy, brushy habitat near forest edge & forest; males
Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: Attracted to Black Light. Above 45 degrees
Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: Attracted To Black Light
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Vance Co.
Comment: Caught Sweeping
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Vance Co.
Comment: Caught Sweeping
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Vance Co.
Comment: Field/forest edge habitat
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Vance Co.
Comment: Field/forest edge habitat