Hoppers of North Carolina:
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DELPHACIDAE Members: NC Records

Sogatella kolophon - No Common Name



© Margarita Lankford

© Margarita Lankford- note pale face

© Margarita Lankford
Taxonomy
Family: DELPHACIDAESubfamily: Delphacinae
Taxonomic Author: (Kirkaldy, 1907)
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: A somewhat bicolored species, with a dark stripe that extends on the sides of the pronotum and scutellum; it ends on the scutellum as a basal triangle. There is a pale, orange-tan median band that extends from the head down to the inner edge of the wings. The face is tan, characteristic of this species. (UDEL)

For images of specimens, see: UDEL, UDEL.

Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Distribution: Widespread and common throughout both the New and Old World. The most abundant New World species of Sogatella. (UDEL)
Abundance: Seemingly a common species, with many records across the state.
Seasonal Occurrence
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Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Grassy areas
Plant Associates: Grasses?, Maize (UDEL)
Behavior: Can be attracted at night with a light.
Comment: Known as a vector for Brazilian wheat spike disease (BWSV), Digitaria striate virus (DSV), and Maize sterile stunt virus (MSSV). Furthermore, old misidentified records of S. furcifera, a species that does not occur in the New World, have been added here under S. kolophon. (UDEL)

NOTE: This species could be confused with Muellerianella laminalis, as they both have a similar coloration. However, laminalis has a dark face while kolophon has a pale face. Additionally, C. Bartlett notes that kolophon is much more slender and less robust than Muellerianella, with a narrower and subtly projected head. Brachypters of Sogatella are rare at best while frequently found in Muellerianella.

This species could also be confused with the other and much less common member of this genus found in the state, S. molina, with very similar thoracic patterns/coloration. However, molina has a dark brown to black mark at the apex of the clavus on the wings, and has the genae darkened in males; in kolophon, the genae are pale.

Bartlett also notes that S. kolophon is likely a very mobile species; when it is abundant in North Carolina, this is likely a result of the population moving north. This would explain how the species can be abundant and widespread in the state but very uncommon most of the time. [Bartlett pers. comments]

Status: Native
Global and State Rank:

Species Photo Gallery for Sogatella kolophon No Common Name

Photo by: Erich Hofmann
New Hanover Co.
Comment: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/59240000
Photo by: Erich Hofmann
New Hanover Co.
Comment: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/59240000
Photo by: Erich Hofmann
New Hanover Co.
Comment: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/59240000
Photo by: Margarita Lankford
Orange Co.
Comment: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/65651854
Photo by: Margarita Lankford
Orange Co.
Comment: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/65651854
Photo by: Margarita Lankford
Orange Co.
Comment: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/65651854
Photo by: Margarita Lankford
Orange Co.
Comment: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/65651854
Photo by: Margarita Lankford
Orange Co.
Comment: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/65651854