Hoppers of North Carolina:
Spittlebugs, Leafhoppers, Treehoppers, and Planthoppers
Scientific Name: Search Common Name:
Family (Alpha):
« »
CICADELLIDAE Members: NC Records

Scaphytopius magdalensis - Blueberry Leafhopper



© Kyle Kittelberger- note dark face

© Ken Childs- note coloration

© Ken Childs- note head shape
Taxonomy
Family: CICADELLIDAESubfamily: DeltocephalinaeSynonym: Scaphytopius vaccinium
Taxonomic Author: Provancher 1889
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: A dark brown species with a moderately pointed crown that is around 1.5 times longer than the width between the eyes. The crown is dark brown with some pale, light markings including the midline, a thin line on either side of the midline, and a broken marking on both edges of the vertex above the pale margin. The pronotum is brown to reddish brown with five pale longitudinal lines; the scutellum is dark brown to orange. The face is dark, brown to dark brown (sometimes blackish) in color. The wings are dark brown with a yellowish tint and many dark irrorations; white areolar spots are scattered throughout. The male subgenital plates are triangular with rounded, bulbous lateral margins near the base; the plates gradually narrow to bluntly pointed apexes. The female pregenital sternite has a pointed, tapered posterior margin that is otherwise strongly produced (convexly). Adult males are around 4.5 mm long, while females are around 4.8 mm. (DeLong 1948), (Hepner 1947)

For diagrams of this species, see: Zahniser.

Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Out of State Record(s)
Distribution: Common and widespread across Eastern North America, ranging as far west as the Rocky Mountains (Hepner 1947)
Abundance: Scattered records across the state, likely more abundant in the right habitat, especially where blueberry is present.
Seasonal Occurrence
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec
Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Has been found in brushy, shrubby areas, open woodlands, forest edge.
Plant Associates: Blueberry (Vaccinium sp.)
Behavior: Can be attracted at night with a light.
Comment: NOTE: A picture of the face and dorsal view showing the length of the head is needed to separate this species from others in the genus. Individuals of S. magdalensis can vary strongly from one another across the range of the species. S. magdalensis resembles female S. nigrifrons, which as the name implies have a dark face. However, nigrifrons is much darker overall than magdalensis.

S. magdalensis can resemble S. acutus dorsally and could be confused. However, magdalensis tends to have a shorter crown and an overall different color pattern. The biggest difference though is the face color: in magdalensis, the face is dark brown whereas in acutus the face is yellowish.

S. magdalensis is an important pest species for many plants, many of which are important agricultural crops; elm, palms, ornamentals, and grapevine are also affected. It is an important vector of blueberry stunt virus in the Northeastern United States. For more information, see the following link: UK.

Status: Native
Global and State Rank:

Species Photo Gallery for Scaphytopius magdalensis Blueberry Leafhopper

Photo by: Margarita Lankford
Orange Co.
Comment: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/77533850
Photo by: Margarita Lankford
Orange Co.
Comment: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/77533850
Photo by: Margarita Lankford
Orange Co.
Comment: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/77533850
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Moore Co.
Comment: sandhills (pine forest) habitat with lots of shrubby vegetation
Photo by: Ken Childs
Out Of State Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Ken Childs
Out Of State Co.
Comment: