Hoppers of North Carolina:
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MEMBRACIDAE Members: NC Records

Telamona monticola - No Common Name



© Ken Childs

© Kyle Kittelberger- male

© Kyle Kittelberger
Taxonomy
Family: MEMBRACIDAESubfamily: SmiliinaeTribe: Telamonini
Taxonomic Author: (Fabricius, 1803)
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: This species usually has a greenish to brown pronotum with scattered with pale yellowish spots. The pronotal crest is [typically] tall and somewhat block-shaped, edged on the top in red; the posterior edge to the crest may be yellow. The pronotal crest may slope downwards more in males than females, and some individuals can have a small crest. The wing tip is a smoky brown, and the wing venation is brown; the rest of the wing is hyaline. The legs are green to brown. Males tend to be smaller than females, being 10 to 11 mm long compared to 11 mm for females (FSCA).
Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Out of State Record(s)
Distribution: Eastern and central North America, as far west as some of the Rocky Mountain states (FSCA)
Abundance: Recorded across the state, uncommon. Seasonal distribution: 20 April-18 October (CTNC)
Seasonal Occurrence
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Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Mixed hardwood forest
Plant Associates: Quercus falcata, Q. margarettae, Q. nigra, Q. rubra, Q. stellata, Vitis rotundifolia (CTNC); also on Robinia pseudoacacia (black locust) (CTGSMNP) Carya cordiformis (bitternut hickory), C. ovata (shagbark hickory), C. pallida (sand hickory), Crataegus (hawthorn), Juglans cinerea (butternut), Nyssa sylvatica (blackgum), Parthenocissus quinquefolia (Virginia creeper), Populus grandidentata (bigtooth aspen), Prunus serotina (black cherry), Quercus alba (white oak) [nymphs on this host], Q. bicolor (swamp white oak) [nymphs], Q. coccinea (scarlet oak) [nymphs], Q. ellipsoidalis (northern pin oak), Q. ilicifolia (bear or scrub oak) [nymphs], Q. imbricaria (shingle oak), Q. macrocarpa (bur oak) [nymphs], Q. marilandica (blackjack oak), Q. montana (chestnut oak) [nymphs], Q. muehlenbergii (chinkapin oak), Q. palustris (pin oak), Q. phellos (willow oak), Q. velutina (black oak) [nymphs], Salix (willow), Sambucus nigra ssp. canadensis (American black elderberry), Smilax (greenbrier), Tilia (basswood) (Wallace 2014).
Behavior: Can be attracted at night.
Comment: This species is unlikely to be confused with other Telamona in much of the eastern United States, though in Florida there is a somewhat similar species, T. dorana, which has a much broder, larger, and more rounded pronotal crest.
Status: Native
Global and State Rank:

Species Photo Gallery for Telamona monticola No Common Name

Photo by: Vin Stanton
Buncombe Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Vin Stanton
Buncombe Co.
Comment:
Photo by: B. Bockhahn
Stokes Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Randy L Emmitt
Orange Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Randy L Emmitt
Orange Co.
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Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Out Of State Co.
Comment: male
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Out Of State Co.
Comment: male
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Out Of State Co.
Comment: male
Photo by: Ken Childs
Out Of State Co.
Comment: