Hoppers of North Carolina:
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CICADELLIDAE Members: NC Records

Pediopsoides distinctus - No Common Name



© Kyle Kittelberger- female

© Kyle Kittelberger- female

© Kyle Kittelberger- male

© Kyle Kittelberger- male
Taxonomy
Family: CICADELLIDAESubfamily: EurymelinaeTribe: MacropsiniSubgenus: Nanopsis
Taxonomic Author: (Van Duzee, 1890)
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: A distinctively colored species. Males are yellowish, with the face, head, legs, and pronotum yellow; there is fuscous speckled across the pronotum and scutellum. In some dark individuals, almost the entire body is blackish brown. The wings are dark brown with a large pale spot near the apex of the wings, along the costa, and a smaller pale spot on the inner margin of the wings, in the middle. Females are greenish-yellow, with some fuscous spotting on the pronotum and scutellum. The hind leg can be bluish-green, contrasting with the yellowish front legs. The wings are not as dark as those of the male but have a similar pattern. Adult males are 3.8-4.4 mm long, while females are 4.2-4.7 mm. (Hamilton 1983) For more images of this species, see: BG.

Nymphs are greenish, flecked with fuscous spots all over the body, with a short head that sometimes has a transverse row of four black spots across the face. (Hamilton 1983)

Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Distribution: Eastern and Central North America
Abundance: Uncommon with several scattered records across the state, possibly more abundant in the state in the right habitat.
Seasonal Occurrence
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec
Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Has been found in grassy areas near mixed hardwood, cypress forest.
Plant Associates: Black walnut (Juglans nigra), butternut (Juglans cinerea); this is the only New-World member of Macropsini that is known to feed on walnut (Hamilton 1983).
Behavior: Can be attracted at night with a light.
Comment: This genus can be differentiated from the other Macropsini in our region by the two large anteapical wing cells; in Oncopsis and Macropsis, there are three anteapical cells (Hamilton 1983).
Status: Native
Global and State Rank:
See also Habitat Account for Rich Wet-Mesic Hardwood Forests

Species Photo Gallery for Pediopsoides distinctus No Common Name

Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment: mixed hardwood forest; female
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment: mixed hardwood forest; female
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment: mixed hardwood forest; female
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment: mixed hardwood forest; female
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Paul Scharf
Gates Co.
Comment: grassy, brushy habitat and mixed hardwood, cypress forest
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Paul Scharf
Gates Co.
Comment: grassy, brushy habitat and mixed hardwood, cypress forest
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Paul Scharf
Gates Co.
Comment: grassy, brushy habitat and mixed hardwood, cypress forest
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Paul Scharf
Gates Co.
Comment: grassy, brushy habitat and mixed hardwood, cypress forest
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Paul Scharf
Gates Co.
Comment: grassy, brushy habitat and mixed hardwood, cypress forest
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Paul Scharf
Gates Co.
Comment: grassy, brushy habitat and mixed hardwood, cypress forest