Hoppers of North Carolina:
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CICADELLIDAE Members: NC Records

Idiocerus nervatus - No Common Name



© Ken Childs

© Ken Childs- note dark wing venation

© Kyle Kittelberger- note color

© Kyle Kittelberger- male
Taxonomy
Family: CICADELLIDAESubfamily: Eurymelinae
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: A yellowish-green species, sometimes with a brownish tint to the wing-tips. It has very prominent dark hind wing venation showing through otherwise hyaline fore wings (tegmina), characteristic of this species. Males have black antennal tips, characteristic of males of this genus, and white facial stripes, with a noticeable white midline on the pronotum. The scutellum on males also has a white mark, and there are two brown lateral triangles in the upper corners of the scutellum. Females lack the midline, have a greenish scutellum, and are more elongate and slender than the males (larger as well). The crown of the head for both sexes is unmarked. The male subgenital plates are short and thin, wider near the apex. The female pregenital sternite has a rounded posterior margin with a shallow median emargination. Adult males are 4.4-5.0 mm long, while females are 4.8-5.3 mm. (Freytag 1965)
Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Out of State Record(s)
Distribution: Found throughout much of the United States, transcontinental
Abundance: Uncommon with scattered records primarily from the Piedmont and Coastal Plain, possibly more abundant in the right habitat.
Seasonal Occurrence
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Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Has been found in open habitat near forest edge.
Plant Associates: Primarily from willows, including Salix lucida, S. amygdaloides, S. lutea, S. lasiandra, S. nigra (black willow), and from junipers (Juniperus virginiana, etc.). Also reported from poplar (Populus deltoides), and out West from redwoods (Sequoia sempervirens). (Freytag 1965)
Behavior: Can be attracted at night with a light.
Comment: According to A. Hamilton, there are two 2 morphologically similar species under the name Idiocerus nervatus that utilize different host plants; one feeds on willows while the other on red-cedar (juniper). It is unclear how to apply the name to which species.The willow feeder tends to be more northerly and the cedar feeder more southerly (it has yet to be recorded in Canada). That being said, at least one individual in the state has been found on willow. (BG)

Some specimens of this species have been confused and mislabeled as I. pallidus. These records have been correctly entered here under I. nervatus.

Status: Native
Global and State Rank:

Species Photo Gallery for Idiocerus nervatus No Common Name

Photo by: Bo Sullivan
Craven Co.
Comment: female, 4.0 mm
Photo by: Bo Sullivan
Craven Co.
Comment: female, 4.0 mm
Photo by: Bo Sullivan
Craven Co.
Comment: female, 4.0 mm
Photo by: Bo Sullivan
Craven Co.
Comment: female, 4.0 mm
Photo by: Mark Shields
Onslow Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Ken Childs
Out Of State Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Ken Childs
Out Of State Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Paul Scharf
Vance Co.
Comment: mostly brushy vegetation consisting of willows, etc., on shore of lake; some grass as well
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Paul Scharf
Vance Co.
Comment: mostly brushy vegetation consisting of willows, etc., on shore of lake; some grass as well
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Paul Scharf
Vance Co.
Comment: mostly brushy vegetation consisting of willows, etc., on shore of lake; some grass as well
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Paul Scharf
Vance Co.
Comment: mostly brushy vegetation consisting of willows, etc., on shore of lake; some grass as well
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Dare Co.
Comment: open, coastal, pine habitat
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Dare Co.
Comment: open, coastal, pine habitat
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Washington Co.
Comment: open habitat near forest edge; in parking lot
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Washington Co.
Comment: open habitat near forest edge; in parking lot
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Washington Co.
Comment: open habitat near forest edge; in parking lot