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CICADELLIDAE Members: NC Records

Kyboasca splendida - No Common Name



© Kyle Kittelberger- side view

© Kyle Kittelberger- top view
Taxonomy
Family: CICADELLIDAESubfamily: TyphlocybinaeTribe: EmpoasciniSynonym: Empoasca splendida
Taxonomic Author: (Gillette, 1898)
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: A stunning species with a distinct, unique pattern. Greenish overall with two bold blue stripes on the wings along the claval suture that are connected with a lateral blue band across the pronotum; when viewed from above, these blue lines form an elongated triangle. Some boldly marked individuals have orange bands bordering either side of the blue stripes on the wings. There is an orange mark on the anterior border of the blue pronotal stripe. There is a blue mark across much of the vertex. The wing tips have a dusky tint. The underside of the body and legs are green. Males are more brightly colored than females.
Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Distribution: Transcontinental across North America (3I)
Abundance: Recorded from a few counties in the Piedmont and mountains; possibly more abundant in the right habitat.
Seasonal Occurrence
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Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Has been found near mixed hardwood forest habitat.
Plant Associates: Alders (Alnus sp.), Alnus incana, Alnus rugosa (3I)
Behavior: Can be attracted at night with a light.
Comment: This species has been subject to some taxonomic name confusion over the years, going by either Kyboasca splendida or as a synonym of Kybos unica. DeLong treated unica as a senior synonym of splendida, a species that belongs in Kyboasca. However, A. Hamilton exaxmined the type specimen of unica and discovered that it is not the same as splendida and instead belongs in Kybos, thereby validating splendida as as a full species within Kyboasca rather than Kybos. The type has a pigmented Cu vein, and the tegmina do not overlap. Additionally, the pronotum is rufous in the type, rather than the typical greenish of splendida, though this could be due to the darkening of the specimen over time. K. unica is only known from the type specimen, and could be a synonym of another species, but the type is a female meaning that it is difficult to associate the specimen with a known species. Hamilton also noted that the pregenital sternite of the female was shorter than any known species. (Hamilton, 1976, J. Kits pers. comment)

Therefore, we will be treating splendida as a full species within Kyboasca.

Status: Native
Global and State Rank:

Species Photo Gallery for Kyboasca splendida No Common Name

Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Rockingham Co.
Comment: grassy area near mixed hardwood forest and a pond
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Rockingham Co.
Comment: grassy area near mixed hardwood forest and a pond
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Rockingham Co.
Comment: grassy area near mixed hardwood forest and a pond
Photo by: J. Allen Ratzlaff
Buncombe Co.
Comment: