Hoppers of North Carolina:
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MEMBRACIDAE Members: NC Records

Telamona stephani - No Common Name



© Kyle Kittelberger

© Kyle Kittelberger

© Patrick Coin
Taxonomy
Family: MEMBRACIDAESubfamily: SmiliinaeTribe: Telamonini
Taxonomic Author: (Wallace, 2018)
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: A dark species that is sexually dimorphic in size, coloration and some features of the pronotal crest. In males, the pronotal crest is low in elevation and curves from the front of the pronotum before angling downward posteriorly. Males have mostly a dark brown to black pronotum with pale but vibrant light greenish-white to green marks. In females, the pronotal crest is much larger, taller and less rounded, angling downwards posteriorly very sharply. Females also have dark and pale mottling similar to the males, but much less vibrantly and with more pale than dark areas; the dark patches are also more of a brownish rather than dark brown to black color. The wings have dark brown to black tips, and the venation is a bold black. The legs are dark with pale spots, and the underside of the body is dark. Males are 8.0-8.4 mm long, females are 9.3-9.5 mm. (Wallace, 2018)

The nymph of this species is unknown.

Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Distribution: Eastern United States
Abundance: Scattered records across the state, where it is uncommon; possibly more abundant in the right habitat. This species differs from other telamonine species in its seasonal occurrence, being found in late summer and fall; most other telamonines in the eastern U.S. are found in the late spring and early summer. (Wallace, 2018)
Seasonal Occurrence
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Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Has been found near mixed hardwood forest, including in higher elevations (Pilot Mountain).
Plant Associates: ?
Behavior: Rarely encountered but usually observed at night with a light. (Wallace, 2018)
Comment: Males of this species are very distinctive and unlikely to be confused with other eastern Telamona. This species was recently described (2018), it was previously misidentified or confused primarily with T. salvini but also with T. dubiosa. This is the first Telamona species described from the United States in 50 years, since 1968. The type locality for this species is from Bladen county, NC. (Wallace, 2018)
Status: Native
Global and State Rank:

Species Photo Gallery for Telamona stephani No Common Name

Photo by: Lior Carlson
Orange Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Vin Stanton
Buncombe Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Randy Emmitt
Orange Co.
Comment: uv light
Photo by: Randy Emmitt
Orange Co.
Comment: landed on my shirt as soon as I got out there! Then went to the UV lights.
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment: open habitat near mixed hardwood forest edge; on a lawn
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment: open habitat near mixed hardwood forest edge; on a lawn
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment: open habitat near mixed hardwood forest edge; on a lawn
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment: open habitat near mixed hardwood forest edge; on a lawn
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Surry Co.
Comment: open habitat near mixed hardwood forest on top of pinnacle
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Surry Co.
Comment: open habitat near mixed hardwood forest on top of pinnacle
Photo by: Patrick Coin
Orange Co.
Comment:
Photo by: B. Bockhahn
Stokes Co.
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