Hoppers of North Carolina:
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Cicadellidae Members: NC Records

Gyponana gladia - No Common Name



© Jim Petranka

© Kyle Kittelberger- note coloration

© Brian Bockhahn

© Jim Petranka
Taxonomy
Family: CicadellidaeSubfamily: Iassinae
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: A reddish species overall, with red markings across the body and on the wings; the wing venation is red, and in boldly marked specimens the red extends onto the rest of the wings. There are eight longitudinal lines on the pronotum, and the wings are typically densely reticulated, with the reticulations extending onto the clavi (the inner region of the wings). Adult males are typically 8.5-9.5 mm long, and Gyponana females tend to be 1.0 mm longer (sometimes more) than the the range of males (Hamilton 1982).
Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Out of State Record(s)
Distribution: Eastern and central North America
Abundance: Very uncommon with several scattered records from the Piedmont and mountains; probably more abundant in the right habitat.
Seasonal Occurrence
Jan
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Nov
Dec
Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Has been found in mixed hardwood forests.
Plant Associates: Unknown
Behavior: Can be attracted at night with a light.
Comment: Most Gyponana species cannot be conclusively identified to species level through analyses of the genitalia, in particular the male genitalia. Gyponana species can vary in venation (i.e. degree of reticulation), wing width, overall length, and even color. Therefore, images identified to a Gyponana species are determined due to having characteristics that are generally indicative of a particular species, and are tentative unless the specimen has been analyzed.

In the case of G. gladia, this species is most similar to G. octolineata as they both have pinkish-red coloration. G. gladia is typically more uniformly red (and a darker red) than in G. octolineata, which has the red usually confined to the wing veins (sometimes) and the thorax. However, the only way for a definitive ID is through analyses of male genitalia as variation does occur in color and wing reticulation among gladia and octolineata.

Status: Native
Global and State Rank:

Species Photo Gallery for Gyponana gladia No Common Name

Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: stuck on a tree band on Willow Oak
Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: stuck on a tree band on Willow Oak
Photo by: Steve Hall
Orange Co.
Comment: At moth sheet
Photo by: Jim Petranka
Madison Co.
Comment: Air temperature around 53 degrees F; I was surprised to see this one active in December.
Photo by: Jim Petranka
Madison Co.
Comment: Air temperature around 53 degrees F; I was surprised to see this one active in December.
Photo by: Jim Petranka
Madison Co.
Comment: Air temperature around 53 degrees F; I was surprised to see this one active in December.
Photo by: Vin Stanton
Buncombe Co.
Comment: Semi-wooded residential neighborhood
Photo by: Jim Petranka
Madison Co.
Comment:
Photo by: J. Allen Ratzlaff
Buncombe Co.
Comment:
Photo by: R Emmitt
Orange Co.
Comment: Gyponana? - unid_leafhopper
Photo by: B. Bockhahn
Stokes Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Out Of State Co.
Comment: NCSU specimen
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Out Of State Co.
Comment: NCSU specimen