Hoppers of North Carolina:
Spittlebugs, Leafhoppers, Treehoppers, and Planthoppers
Scientific Name: Search Common Name:
Family (Alpha):
« »
CICADELLIDAE Members: NC Records

Eutettix unidentified species - No Common Name



© Ken Kneidel- possibly E. luridus

© Ken Kneidel- possibly E. luridus

© Kyle Kittelberger- nymph
Taxonomy
Family: CICADELLIDAESubfamily: Deltocephalinae
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Distribution: North America
Abundance: Found throughout the Piedmont and Coastal Plain.
Seasonal Occurrence
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec
Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Mixed hardwood forest and forest edge.
Plant Associates:
Behavior: Can be attracted at night with a light.
Comment: Eutettix is probably one of the most challenging leafhopper genera to distinguish individuals to species based on photographs. E. pictus is fairly distinct, as are some individuals of E. luridus that have a bold pattern. However, individuals that resemble luridus but with a redder, less bold pattern could represent other species. Eutettix is a genus in dire need of a revision, with the last one occurring in the 1940s. Only a handful of species are known well enough, while many species closely resemble others and therefore cannot be identified without a male being dissected. On top of that, there appears to be at least one undescribed member of this genus in our region and possibly others.

Due to these challenges within identifying some members of this genus without a male specimen that is dissected, and the fact that this genus is in dire need of a taxonomic revision, this page will serve as an umbrella for unidentified Eutettix.

Status: Native
Global and State Rank:

Species Photo Gallery for Eutettix unidentified species No Common Name

Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: 5.1 mm male, trapped in Tanglefoot on a tree band on Willow Oak
Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: 5.1 mm male, trapped in Tanglefoot on a tree band on Willow Oak
Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: 5.1 mm male, trapped in Tanglefoot on a tree band on Willow Oak
Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: male, photographed by K. Kittelberger; collected on sappy tree bands that the city puts up to "protect" trees from Fall Cankerworms
Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: male, photographed by K. Kittelberger; collected on sappy tree bands that the city puts up to \"protect\" trees from Fall Cankerworms
Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: 5.3 mm and 5.1 mm males, one of several Eutettix individuals stuck in Tanglefoot on a tree bands on Willow Oaks, Quercus phellos.
Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: 5.3 mm and 5.1 mm males, one of several Eutettix individuals stuck in Tanglefoot on a tree bands on Willow Oaks, Quercus phellos.
Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: 5.3 mm male, one of several Eutettix individuals stuck in Tanglefoot on a tree bands on Willow Oaks, Quercus phellos.
Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: 5.3 mm male, one of several Eutettix individuals stuck in Tanglefoot on a tree bands on Willow Oaks, Quercus phellos.
Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: 5.4 mm male, one of several Eutettix individuals stuck in Tanglefoot on a tree bands on Willow Oaks, Quercus phellos.
Photo by: Scott Bolick
Scotland Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Scott Bolick
Scotland Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: 5.3 mm male, dead, stuck in Tanglefoot on tree band, tree between paved street and pond surrounded by woodland
Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: 5.3 mm male, dead, stuck in Tanglefoot on tree band, tree between paved street and pond surrounded by woodland
Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: 5.3 mm male, dead, stuck in Tanglefoot on tree band, tree between paved street and pond surrounded by woodland
Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: 5.3 mm male, dead, stuck in Tanglefoot on tree band, tree between paved street and pond surrounded by woodland
Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: female, I measured 5.5 mm, but not in good condition, one of several E. luridus I've been finding throughout Charlotte stuck in Tanglefoot on tree bands
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment: caught sweeping
Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: 5.4 mm male, one of several Eutettix individuals stuck in Tanglefoot on a tree bands on Willow Oaks, Quercus phellos.
Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: 5.4 mm male, one of several Eutettix individuals stuck in Tanglefoot on a tree bands on Willow Oaks, Quercus phellos.
Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: 5.4 mm male, one of several Eutettix individuals stuck in Tanglefoot on a tree bands on Willow Oaks, Quercus phellos.
Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment: caught sweeping
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment: caught sweeping
Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: trapped in Tanglefoot on a tree band, still alive
Photo by: Randy Emmitt
Orange Co.
Comment: uv lights
Photo by:
Wake Co.
Comment: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/17551641