Hoppers of North Carolina:
Spittlebugs, Leafhoppers, Treehoppers, and Planthoppers
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DERBIDAE Members: NC Records

Omolicna mcateei - No Common Name



© Kyle Kittelberger

© Kyle Kittelberger- note orange coloration

© Kyle Kittelberger- note color
Taxonomy
Family: DERBIDAETribe: Cenchreini
Taxonomic Author: (Dozier, 1928)
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: A fairly uniformly colored species, with a rich fulvous body color. The wings are largely washed with orange, though there may be some grayish-blue mixed in, particularly closer to the tips. The wing tips have a pink margin. This is a somewhat medium-sized species, noted in Halbert et al. (2014 as being 3.5-4.0 mm long; however, per individuals on here, this species can also be noticeably larger and range up to around 5.5 mm.

For more images of this species nicely showing the orange coloration of the body and wings, see: BG.

Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Distribution: Southeastern United States (UDEL)
Abundance: Previously recorded from North Carolina, but unclear from where (UDEL). Recently recorded from several counties in the Coastal Plain, probably more abundant along the coast.
Seasonal Occurrence
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Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Has been found in open, coastal pine habitat.
Plant Associates: Physalis spp. (groundcherry) (UDEL)
Behavior: Can be attracted at night with a light.
Comment: This species is similar to Omolicna fulva, but that species has a pink rather than fulvous body and grayish-blue rather than fulvous, orange coloration across the wings. A third species could potentially occur in NC: O. joi, recently described from Florida. O. joi feeds on palmetto, in particular Sabal palmetto, which ranges as far north as southeastern NC with a small patch in Hatteras. O. joi has a dark purple cast to the forewings compared to O. fulva and is 3.6-4.8 mm long. For more information on O. joi and a key to the four species of Omolicna listed here, see: Halbert et al. 2014.
Status: Native
Global and State Rank:

Species Photo Gallery for Omolicna mcateei No Common Name

Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Dare Co.
Comment: open, coastal, pine habitat
Photo by: Mark Shields
Onslow Co.
Comment: approx. 5.5 mm long
Photo by: Bo Sullivan
Carteret Co.
Comment: male 4.7 mm, photographed by K. Kittelberger; collected at UV trap
Photo by: Bo Sullivan
Carteret Co.
Comment: male 4.7 mm, photographed by K. Kittelberger; collected at UV trap
Photo by: Bo Sullivan
Carteret Co.
Comment: male 4.7 mm, photographed by K. Kittelberger; collected at UV trap