Vascular Plants of North Carolina
Account for Engelmann's Quillwort - Isoetes engelmannii   A. Braun
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Section 1 » Order Isoetales » Family Isoetaceae
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AuthorA. Braun
DistributionNearly statewide, but seemingly absent in the northeastern Coastal Plain. This is the most widespread and numerous quillwort in the state.

This is a rather widespread species in the East, ranging from southern ME and MI south to southern GA and northeastern MS. It is certainly under-collected over this range.
AbundanceFairly common (at a minimum) in the southeastern Coastal Plain and the southern mountains, and uncommon to infrequent elsewhere, though very rare to absent in the northeastern Coastal Plain. As there are numerous records for southeastern VA, it likely could be present in most NC counties. The website editors suggest that both ranks are somewhat conservative, as it certainly should have a Global Rank of G5, and a State Rank at least S4S5 (at least if the much more scarce I. appalachiana is ranked by NCNHP as S3S4).
HabitatThis species is "Most commonly submerged in streams and ponds, but also emergent in seepage areas, wet ditches, and depressions" (Digital Atlas of the Virginia Flora website).
PhenologyFruits from May to October.
IdentificationAll Isoetes species are quite grass-like, with numerous very slender and grass-like leaves growing from a common base. Most importantly, they are swollen at the base, where the megaspores are present, the key structure for separation of species. The leaves are terete (rounded) and hollow. For identification, see the key in Weakley (2018).
Taxonomic CommentsThis has always been a good, named species, but it contained other species which have later been pulled out as separate species, such as I. appalachiana (in 1997).

All Isoetes species are quite grass-like, with numerous very slender and grass-like leaves growing from a common base. Most importantly, they are swollen at the base, where the megaspores are present, the key structure for separation of species. The leaves are terete (rounded) and hollow. For identification, see the key in Weakley (2018).
Other Common Name(s)Appalachian Quillwort, but this was a/the primary common name until I. appalachiana was described and thus "took" that common name, leaving Engelmann's Quillwort the obvious common name in use now.
State RankS4 [S4S5]
Global RankG4 [G5]
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