Moths of North Carolina
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View PDFElachistidae Members: 40 NC Records

Antaeotricha humilis (Zeller, 1855) - Dotted Anteotricha Moth


Taxonomy
Superfamily: Gelechioidea Family: ElachistidaeSubfamily: StenomatinaeTribe: [Stenomatini]P3 Number: 420232.00 MONA Number: 1019.00
Comments: The genus Antaeotricha is endemic to the New World and includes nearly 400 species of mostly neotropical species. Twenty species are currently recognized in North America.
Identification
Field Guide Descriptions: Online Photographs: MPG, BugGuide, iNaturalist, Google, BAMONATechnical Description, Adults: Duckworth (1964)Technical Description, Immature Stages: Marquis et al. (2019)                                                                                 
Adult Markings: The following is based primarily on descriptions by Forbes (1923) and Duckworth (1964). The face is white and sprinkled with brown, while the labial palp is similar but only sprinkled with brown exteriorly. The ground color of the head, thorax, antenna, and forewing varies from ashy gray to grayish brown, with the latter more typical of females. The forewing has a rather complex series of marks that are variable, in part depending on the degree of wear. The following is a general description of the major features, but expect variation among individuals. Two small longitudinal streaks are present at the extreme based of the wing. Beginning at about one-fifth the wing length there is a series of two or three spots that begin at the costa and slant posteriorly towards an inverted V-shaped or U-shaped mark that adjoins the inner margin. At about two-thirds there is a second series of one to three spots and an accompanying jagged narrow streak. These are on the inner half of the wing and run roughly perpendicular to the inner margin. The costal margin has two additional small dark blotches at about one-half and four-fifths. The later usually connects to a faint, curved, subterminal band that arches towards the inner margin. At the wing tip, there is a line of fine dark spots that extends from the inner margin along the base of the fringe, then around the apex where it terminates near the costal blotch at four-fifths. The hindwing and cilia are light tan and darker than the forewings, while the abdomen is whitish ocherous. The foreleg is brown with the tarsi ringed with white. The midleg is white with scattered brown mottling, and the hindleg is mostly white.
Wingspan: 12-15 mm (Duckworth, 1964)
Adult Structural Features: Duckworth (1964) has descriptions and illustrations of the male and female genitalia.
Adult ID Requirements: Identifiable from good quality photos of unworn specimens.
Immatures and Development: The following summary of the larval life history is based largely on studies in Missouri by Marquis et al. (2019) and Carroll and Kearby (1978). The larvae specialize on oaks and the early instars are gregarious. There are six instars and two generations per year in Missouri, with larvae present from May to July, and again from late August to November. The early instar larvae are leaf rollers in spring, but later bind two overlapping leaves together with silk and form winding tunnels of frass and silk between leaves during mid to late summer. They typically only feed on the lower leaf surface within the bound leaves. Larvae in the autumn overwinter in leaf litter beneath oak trees. The mature larva has a tan head above that lacks markings and a single genal stripe. The first two thoracic segments are blackish and there a series of brownish scalloped marks along each side of the body. Marquis et al. (2019) provide detailed descriptions of the larvae, and delineate features that will distinguish this species from other Antaeotricha that occur in the eastern US.
Larvae ID Requirements: Identifiable from close inspection of specimens or by DNA analysis.
Distribution in North Carolina
Distribution: Antaeotricha humilis is found throughout much of the eastern US from Connecticut, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Illinois southward to the Gulf Coast and Florida. The range extends west to central Oklahoma and central Texas. A single record is known from southwestern Ontario. As of 2020, we have records from all areas of the state except for the higher elevations in the mountains.
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Flight Dates:
 High Mountains (HM) ≥ 4,000 ft.
 Low Mountains (LM) < 4,000 ft.
 Piedmont (Pd)
 Coastal Plain (CP)

Click on graph to enlarge
Flight Comments: Adults have been recorded from March through October in different areas of the range. Most local populations appear to be bivoltine with the first brood in early to mid-summer and a second in late-summer or early fall. Populations in North Carolina are bivoltine, with the season peaks in adults occurring in mid-May through early June, and again in mid-July through early August.
Habitats and Life History
Habitats: This species is an oak specialist and uses numerous species that inhabit a diversity of habitats. The host species inhabitat sites that range from wet bottomland forests, to sandy, xeric sites in the Coastal Plain, as well as more mesic to dry sites in the Piedmont and lower mountains.
Larval Host Plants: The larvae specialize on oaks and use numerous species. Hosts listed by Robinson et al. (2010), Heppner (2003) and Marquis et al. (2019) include White Oak (Quercus alba), Bear Oak (Q. ilicifolia), Shingle Oak (Q. imbricaria), Laurel Oak (Q. laurifolia), Turkey Oak (Q. laevis), Blackjack Oak (Q. marilandica), Chinquapin Oak (Q. muehlenbergii), Water Oak (Q. nigra), Northern Red Oak (Q. rubra), Black Oak (Q. velutina) and Live Oak (Q. virginiana.)
Observation Methods: The adults are attracted to lights.
Wikipedia
See also Habitat Account for General Oak-Hickory Forests
Status in North Carolina
Natural Heritage Program Status:
Natural Heritage Program Ranks: GNR [S4S5]
State Protection: Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.
Comments: Populations occur statewide and appear to be secure.

 Photo Gallery for Antaeotricha humilis - Dotted Anteotricha Moth

36 photos are available. Only the most recent 30 are shown.

Recorded by: Dean Furbish on 2021-09-13
Wake Co.
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Recorded by: R. Newman on 2021-09-04
Carteret Co.
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Recorded by: Stephen Hall on 2021-08-10
Orange Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2021-08-06
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: Vin Stanton on 2021-06-02
Buncombe Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2021-06-01
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: David L. Heavner on 2021-05-27
Chatham Co.
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Recorded by: David L. Heavner on 2021-05-27
Chatham Co.
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Recorded by: R. Newman on 2021-04-20
Carteret Co.
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Recorded by: Vin Stanton on 2020-05-25
Buncombe Co.
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Recorded by: Vin Stanton on 2020-05-25
Buncombe Co.
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Recorded by: Mark Shields on 2020-05-16
Onslow Co.
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Recorded by: Kyle Kittelberger on 2020-05-14
Moore Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2019-08-10
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2019-08-01
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: Mark Shields on 2019-07-30
Onslow Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2019-07-24
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2019-07-11
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2019-07-11
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2019-06-04
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: Vin Stanton on 2019-05-19
Buncombe Co.
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Recorded by: Vin Stanton on 2019-05-19
Buncombe Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2019-05-17
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2019-05-17
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2019-05-17
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2019-05-17
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2019-05-17
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: Vin Stanton on 2018-05-12
Buncombe Co.
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Recorded by: B. Bockhahn, P. Scharf, S. Hall on 2015-07-22
Stanly Co.
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Recorded by: Paul Scharf on 2015-06-02
Warren Co.
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