Moths of North Carolina
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Pennisetia Members:
12 NC Records

Pennisetia marginatum (Harris, 1839) - Raspberry Crown Borer Moth


Taxonomy
Superfamily: Sesioidea Family: SesiidaeSubfamily: TinthiinaeTribe: PennisetiiniP3 Number: 640057.00 MONA Number: 2513.00
Comments: Of the 133 members of the Sesiidae family that occur in North American north of Mexico, 30 have been recorded in North Carolina, and marginata is the lone representative of the genus. The taxonomy of some groups in this family remains vexing. Some sesiids, known broadly as clearwing borers, are significant pests of commercial crops.
Identification
Field Guide Descriptions: Covell (1984); Beadle and Leckie (2018)Online Photographs: MPG, BugGuide, iNaturalist, Google, BAMONA, GBIF, BOLDTechnical Description, Adults: Eichlin and Duckworth (1988)                                                                                 
Adult Markings: Thorax is brownish-black with narrow yellow along margins, with a pair of yellow spots at the base of the forewing. Abdomen is cylindrical in shape, brownish-black, and ringed with yellow on posterior edge of all segments except 1 and 2, either of which may be ringed with yellow anteriorly or unmarked (Eichlin & Duckworth, 1988), and abdominal segment 3 bears a well-developed dorsal tuft (Forbes, 1923). Forewing hyaline and edged broadly in ochraceous-brown and bears an ochraceous-brown discal mark. Hindwing hyaline with narrow margins. Legs yellow, antennae dark. Sexes similar but male has strongly pectinate antennae (bipectinate at base) and possesses an anal tuft, which is dark brown or black mixed with yellow; female larger, terminal segment of abdomen is yellow. Wing length 8-16 mm (Eichlin & Duckworth, 1988).
Adult ID Requirements: Identifiable from good quality photos of unworn specimens.
Immatures and Development: Larvae bore into and develop out of sight inside plant tissue. Young larvae overwinter inside roots of food plants. Mature larvae ascend into canes during summer, where most overwinter a second year before emerging (Taft, Smitley & Snow, 2004).
Distribution in North Carolina
Distribution:
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Flight Dates:
 High Mountains (HM) ‚Č• 4,000 ft.
 Low Mountains (LM) < 4,000 ft.
 Piedmont (Pd)
 Coastal Plain (CP)

Click on graph to enlarge
Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Fields, forest edges, and disturbed habitats where its food plants are found.
Larval Host Plants: Rubus spp. (Roseaceae), such as blackberry and raspberry (Eichlin & Duckworth, 1988). - View
Observation Methods: May be searched for around food plants. Though not attracted to lights or bait, males may be lured to traps using synthetic, chemically engineered sex attractants (Eichlin and Duckworth, 1988).
Wikipedia
Status in North Carolina
Natural Heritage Program Status:
Natural Heritage Program Ranks:
State Protection: Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.
Comments: This species closely mimics a Yellow Jacket hornet (Vespula sp.). A not uncommon day-flier, but generally inconspicuous and only infrequently encountered in natural settings.

 Photo Gallery for Pennisetia marginatum - Raspberry Crown Borer Moth

Photos: 12

Recorded by: Lisa Rich on 2022-10-13
Wake Co.
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Recorded by: Lisa Rich on 2022-10-13
Wake Co.
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Recorded by: Ken Kneidel on 2022-09-23
Mecklenburg Co.
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Recorded by: Rob Van Epps on 2021-10-06
Mecklenburg Co.
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Recorded by: Rob Van Epps on 2021-10-06
Mecklenburg Co.
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Recorded by: F. Williams, S. Williams on 2019-09-19
Gates Co.
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Recorded by: Steve Hall on 2019-08-01
Yancey Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2018-09-20
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2018-09-20
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2018-09-20
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: F. Williams on 2017-09-19
Gates Co.
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Recorded by: F. Williams on 2017-09-19
Gates Co.
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