Moths of North Carolina
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Homosetia Members:
12 NC Records

Homosetia bifasciella Chambers, 1876 - No Common Name


Taxonomy
Superfamily: Tineoidea Family: TineidaeP3 Number: 300128.00 MONA Number: 287.00
Comments: Homosetia is a small genus with 12 recognized species that are found only in North America.
Species Status: Homosetia bifasciella is a member of a complex of externally-similar species that all have gray forewings with small patches of dark-yellow scaling and blackish tufts of raised scales at about one fifth, one half, and four fifths of the wing length from the base. Some or all of the tufts are found within diffuse dark fascias that extend the entire breadth of the forewing. The tufts are often missing from wear and may be indiscernible in some specimens. Terry Harrison (microleps.org) has discovered at least five undescribed species in this complex that occur in Illinois, and that are likely found farther east, including in North Carolina. These forms are best identified based on genital morphology. Until these forms are formally described -- and their status in North Carolina determined -- we have elected to treat these all as H. bifasciella.
Identification
Field Guide Descriptions: Online Photographs: MPG, BugGuide, iNaturalist, Google, BAMONA, GBIF, BOLDTechnical Description, Adults: Dietz (1905)                                                                                 
Adult Markings: The following is based in part by the descriptions by Dietz (1905) and Forbes (1923). The face is whitish and the vertex brown. The labial palp is yellowish white, with the second joint fuscous externally and beneath. The antenna is grayish ocherous and finely annulated with fuscous above, while the basal joint is dark brown. The thorax is dark brown to blackish. The forewing ground color is silvery white, but often obscured by a heavy dusting of brown to golden brown scales. The forewing is overlain with a series of dark brown to blackish scale tufts that produce an irregular banded appearance with two or three bands along the length (the anteriormost band is sometimes not evident). The dark tufts are present at about one-fifth the wing length, as an oblique pair just before one-half, and a pair in the post-median area at about four-fifths, with the one on the costa larger. Beginning at about two-thirds, there are a series of white costal spots or somewhat oblique dashes that become more pronounced towards the apex. These continue around the wing tip to the inner margin and fringe before termination at about two-thirds. The spots or dashes extend into the base of the fringe and are often separated by darker bars or blotches. The hindwings are pale fuscous and the cilia concolorous. Specimens vary from dark to light brown. Features that help to distinguish this species include the white face and contrasting dark vertex, the dark bands on the dorsum, and the light spots or dashes along the apical third of the costa and inner margin.
Wingspan: 11.0 mm (Dietz, 1905).
Adult ID Requirements: Identifiable from good quality photos of unworn specimens.
Distribution in North Carolina
Distribution: Homosetia bifasciella is found primarily in eastern North America. Adults have been collected in southern Canada (Alberta; Manitoba; Ontario; Quebec), and in the US from Maine southward to Florida, and westward to eastern Texas, Arkansas, and Indiana. As of 2020, we have only three site records that are from the Piedmont and a lower elevation site in the mountains.
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Flight Dates:
 High Mountains (HM) ‚Č• 4,000 ft.
 Low Mountains (LM) < 4,000 ft.
 Piedmont (Pd)
 Coastal Plain (CP)

Click on graph to enlarge
Flight Comments: Adults have been observed in areas outside of North Carolina from March to September, with most from June through August. As of 2020, we have records from mid-May to mid-September.
Habitats and Life History
Habitats: The preferred habitats are undocumented.
Larval Host Plants: The hosts are unknown, but this species presumably does not feed on live foliage given that most tineids feed on detritus, fungi, or lichens. - View
Observation Methods: The adults are attracted to lights.
Wikipedia
Status in North Carolina
Natural Heritage Program Status:
Natural Heritage Program Ranks: GNR SU
State Protection:
Comments: We currently do not have sufficient information on the distribution and abundance of this species in North Carolina to assess its conservation status.

 Photo Gallery for Homosetia bifasciella - No common name

Photos: 14

Recorded by: David George, Stephen Dunn, Jeff Niznik on 2023-07-31
Macon Co.
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Recorded by: Stephen Dunn, Jeff Niznik on 2023-07-26
Chatham Co.
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Recorded by: David George, Stephen Dunn, Jeff Niznik on 2023-07-13
Orange Co.
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Recorded by: John Petranka on 2022-09-01
Orange Co.
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Recorded by: tom ward on 2022-05-14
Buncombe Co.
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Recorded by: tom ward on 2022-05-11
Buncombe Co.
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Recorded by: Simpson Eason on 2022-05-06
Durham Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2019-09-02
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2019-09-02
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2018-09-12
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2018-09-12
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: Harry Wilson on 2015-05-12
Wake Co.
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Recorded by: Kyle Kittelberger on 2013-07-27
Wake Co.
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Recorded by: Kyle Kittelberger on 2011-07-30
Wake Co.
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