Moths of North Carolina
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View PDFTineidae Members: 59 NC Records

Monopis longella (Walker, 1863) - Pavlovski's Monopis Moth


Taxonomy
Superfamily: Tineoidea Family: TineidaeSubfamily: TineinaeTribe: [Tineini]P3 Number: 300174.00 MONA Number: 418.10 MONA Synonym: Monopis pavlovski
Identification
Field Guide Descriptions: Beadle and Leckie (2012)Online Photographs: MPG, BugGuide, iNaturalist, Google, BAMONA                                                                                 
Adult Markings: This is a distinctively marked small moth that is difficult to confuse with any other species other than M. monachella. The head, head tuft, and thorax are white to yellowish white. The antenna is dark brown near the base and becomes progressively lighter near the tip. The base color of the wing is dark brown to bluish black and often has a few scattered whitish scales intermixed. There are three or more patches of raised scales that run parallel to the inner margin and are centered at about one-half the wing length. The most conspicuous mark is a large white to pale yellow patch that begins on the costa and terminates just before the apex. The anterior edge slants posteriorly to the middle of the wing then angles posteriorly as a concave depression. The depression runs roughly parallel to the costa before tapering back to the costa. A darker stained area occurs within the patch along the costa. A semi-hyaline area that appears light rusty brown is usually evident just dorsal to the patch. Monopis monachella is similar buts lacks the dark stained area within the large costal patch. This species is more northern and has not been found in North Carolina as of 2020.
Adult ID Requirements: Identifiable from good quality photos of unworn specimens.
Immatures and Development: The larvae are detritivores and scavengers that are known to feed on bird feathers. Nasu et al. (2012) and Sato et al. (2019) found larvae to be common in owl nests in Japan where they likely fed on droppings, feathers, and other organic debris. Adults have been attracted and reared by putting mesh bags full of feathers in outdoor settings.
Distribution in North Carolina
Distribution: Monopis longella is an exotic species that is native to southeastern Asia. Populations are widespread across eastern North America, including extreme southern Canada and much of the eastern US. The range in the US extends from Maine to Florida, and westward to eastern Texas, Missouri Illinois, and Michigan. This species occurs statewide in North Carolina from coastal regions to the lower elevations in the mountains.
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Flight Dates:
 High Mountains (HM) ≥ 4,000 ft.
 Low Mountains (LM) < 4,000 ft.
 Piedmont (Pd)
 Coastal Plain (CP)

Click on graph to enlarge
Flight Comments: Adults have been collected from February through November in areas outside of the North Carolina, with the adults most active in late summer. Populations in North Carolina appear to be bivoltine, with an initial brood in late spring or early summer, and an apparent second brood in late summer and early autumn.
Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Sato et al. (2019) found that this species strongly preferred owl nests in forested settings in Japan. We have many records from semi-wooded residential neighborhoods as well as natural, forested habitats.
Larval Host Plants: The larvae are detritivores and scavengers that feed on bird feathers, bird dropping, and organic debris in bird nests (Huang et al., 2011; Nasu et al., 2012; Sato et al. 2019).
Observation Methods: The adults are attracted to light. The larvae have not been found in the US, but presumably use bird nests here as in their native range.
Wikipedia
See also Habitat Account for Exotic Invaded Habitats
Status in North Carolina
Natural Heritage Program Status:
Natural Heritage Program Ranks: GNR SNA
State Protection: Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.
Comments: This species is exotic and does not merit protection.

 Photo Gallery for Monopis longella - Pavlovski's Monopis Moth

65 photos are available. Only the most recent 30 are shown.

Recorded by: R. Newman on 2021-11-01
Carteret Co.
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Recorded by: R. Newman on 2021-10-18
Carteret Co.
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Recorded by: Stephen Hall, Ed Corey, Jim Petranka, Becky Elkin, Tom Howard, Carol Tingley, Brian Bockhahn, and Van Cotter on 2021-09-29
Durham Co.
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Recorded by: R. Newman on 2021-09-16
Carteret Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2021-09-07
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: David George on 2021-08-20
Durham Co.
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Recorded by: Simpson Eason on 2021-08-06
Durham Co.
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Recorded by: tom ward on 2021-07-17
Buncombe Co.
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Recorded by: Simpson Eason on 2021-05-16
Durham Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2021-05-06
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2021-04-14
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: R. Newman on 2020-11-04
Carteret Co.
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Recorded by: R. Newman on 2020-11-04
Carteret Co.
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Recorded by: R. Newman on 2020-10-21
Carteret Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2020-10-21
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2020-10-21
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2020-10-15
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2020-10-08
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2020-10-06
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2020-09-26
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Simpson Eason on 2020-09-18
Durham Co.
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Recorded by: Stephen Hall on 2020-09-07
Orange Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2020-09-06
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Steve Hall on 2020-07-16
Orange Co.
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Recorded by: Vin Stanton on 2020-06-08
Buncombe Co.
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Recorded by: Steve Hall on 2020-06-05
Orange Co.
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Recorded by: Stephen Hall on 2020-05-28
Orange Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2020-05-15
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: Kyle Kittelberger on 2020-05-02
Wake Co.
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Recorded by: Mark Shields on 2020-04-18
Onslow Co.
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