Moths of North Carolina
Scientific Name:
Common Name:
Family (Alpha):
« »
View PDFGracillariidae Members:
Caloptilia Members:
5 NC Records

Caloptilia coroniella (Clemens, 1864) - No Common Name


Taxonomy
Family: GracillariidaeSubfamily: GracillariinaeP3 Number: 330123.00 MONA Number: 601.00
Identification
Field Guide Descriptions: Online Photographs: MPG, BugGuide, iNaturalist, Google, BAMONA, GBIF, BOLDTechnical Description, Adults: Forbes (1923)Technical Description, Immature Stages: Eiseman (2019)                                                                                 
Adult Markings: The following is based in part on the description in Forbes (1923). The head is dark yellowish. The labial palp is dull white to dull yellowish with the third segment dark on the outer side. The antenna is light brown with faint darker annulations and extends to the tip of the wings. The forewing ground color varies from reddish brown to purplish brown. A conspicuous, truncated triangular patch is present at about two-fifths. It extends from the costa and terminates at the fold before reaching the dorsal margin. The triangular patch has a series of 4-7 small dark spots along the costal margin and is asymmetric, with the apical end having a more exaggerated taper. The fringe is yellowish and tipped with black. The tibia and femur of the front and middle leg are dark and concolorous with the ground of the forewing, while the tarsi are white with fine dark markings near the tarsal joints. The rear leg is dull whitish, with faint dark marking near the tarsal joints.
Wingspan: 10 mm (Forbes, 1923).
Adult ID Requirements: Identifiable from good quality photos of unworn specimens.
Immatures and Development: The larvae produce linear blotch mines on the undersides of birch leaves. The eggs are often laid near a side vein and the linear portion may run a short distance along the vein before crossing to an adjoining vein. The linear portion runs for only 1-2 cm before expanding into a small, elongated blotch. The later instars leave the blotch and feed within a conical roll that begins at the leaf apex, or they may simple fold the leaf edge to make a shelter. The final instar exits the roll to spins a whitish cocoon in a leaf fold (Eiseman, 2019).
Larvae ID Requirements: Identifiable from good quality photos, especially where associated with known host plants.
Distribution in North Carolina
Distribution: Caloptilia coroniella is mostly confined to north temperate areas of North America. Populations in Canada have been found as far west as Alberta, and from Ontario eastward to Nova Scotia and Newfoundland. In the US, the range extends from Vermont, Connecticut, Massachusetts westward to Illinois and Michigan, and southward to Ohio, Pennsylvania and Maryland. The recent discovery of this species in North Carolina represents a substantial extension of the range southward.
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Flight Dates:
 High Mountains (HM) ‚Č• 4,000 ft.
 Low Mountains (LM) < 4,000 ft.
 Piedmont (Pd)
 Coastal Plain (CP)

Click on graph to enlarge
Flight Comments: The adults have been observed from April through October in areas outside of North Carolina. As of 2021, we have two adult records from March and one larval record from mid-July.
Habitats and Life History
Habitats: The larvae feed on birches. The only larval record for North Carolina is from River Birch, which is found along stream banks, in floodplain forests, and in other wetland settings.
Larval Host Plants: This species uses Paper Birch (Betula papyrifera), Gray Birch (B. populifolia), and ornamental birches in Canada and the northeastern US. We have a record of it using River Birch (B. nigra) in North Carolina. - View
Observation Methods: The adults occasionally visit lights. We encourage naturalists to searched for the leaf rolls on native birches to better document the hosts and habitat requirements for North Carolina populations.
Wikipedia
See also Habitat Account for General Birch Forests
Status in North Carolina
Natural Heritage Program Status:
Natural Heritage Program Ranks: GNR S2S4
State Protection:
Comments: This species was only recently discovered in North Carolina and we currently do not have sufficient information to assess its conservation status.

 Photo Gallery for Caloptilia coroniella - No common name

Photos: 14

Recorded by: Dean Furbish on 2022-07-04
Wake Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: Dean Furbish on 2022-07-04
Wake Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: Dean Furbish on 2022-07-04
Wake Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: Tracy S. Feldman on 2022-06-13
Durham Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: Tracy S. Feldman on 2022-06-13
Durham Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: Tracy S. Feldman on 2022-06-13
Durham Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2021-03-14
Guilford Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2021-03-14
Guilford Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2021-03-14
Guilford Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2021-03-03
Guilford Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2021-03-03
Guilford Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: Tracy S Feldman on 2020-07-17
Durham Co.
Comment: Leaf mines on Betula nigra.
Recorded by: Tracy S Feldman on 2020-07-17
Durham Co.
Comment: Leaf roll on Betula nigra.
Recorded by: Tracy S Feldman on 2020-07-17
Durham Co.
Comment: A reared adult.