Moths of North Carolina
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View PDFErebidae Members: 20 NC Records

Clemensia umbrata Packard, 1872 - No Common Name


Taxonomy
Superfamily: Noctuoidea Family: ErebidaeSubfamily: ArctiinaeTribe: LithosiiniP3 Number: 930215.10 MONA Number: 8098.20
Comments: One of three species in this genus that occur in North America (Lafontaine and Schmidt, 2010). All three are found in North Carolina.
Species Status: All three North American species have been bar-coded and are distinct (Schmidt and Sullivan, 2018)
Identification
Field Guide Descriptions: Online Photographs: MPG, BugGuide, iNaturalist, Google, BAMONA, GBIFTechnical Description, Adults: Schmidt and Sullivan (2018)                                                                                 
Adult Markings: This species is similar in pattern to the much more ubiquitous Clemensia albata, but is larger and much more suffused with gray and black; a diffuse patch of dark gray is located postmedially near the anal angle that is absent or more restricted in albata (Schmidt and Sullivan, 2018).
Forewing Length: 12.3 mm, males (Schmidt and Sullivan, 2018)
Distribution in North Carolina
Distribution: The populations in the Southern Appalachians appear to be a Pleistocene relicts, with the next nearest population shown on the Moth Photographer's Group website in Vermont. This species occurs widely in the North, from Nova Scotia to the Great Lakes region and west across Canada. It also occurs down the West Coast to central California.
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Flight Dates:
 High Mountains (HM) ≥ 4,000 ft.
 Low Mountains (LM) < 4,000 ft.
 Piedmont (Pd)
 Coastal Plain (CP)

Click on graph to enlarge
Flight Comments: Univoltine, flying in July at high elevations but from June to September at low elevations.
Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Usually found above 3100' in North Carolina (Schmidt and Sullivan, 2018), but has been observed as low as 2200' in Graham County
Larval Host Plants: Larvae probably graze on lichens growing on tree bark (Schmidt and Sullivan, 2018)
Wikipedia
Status in North Carolina
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 Photo Gallery for Clemensia umbrata - No common name

Photos: 9

Recorded by: Owen McConnell on 2021-05-09
Graham Co.
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Recorded by: Owen McConnell on 2019-09-30
Graham Co.
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Recorded by: Owen McConnell on 2019-09-23
Graham Co.
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Recorded by: Owen McConnell on 2019-09-20
Graham Co.
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Recorded by: Owen McConnell on 2019-09-17
Graham Co.
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Recorded by: Owen McConnell on 2019-09-12
Graham Co.
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Recorded by: Owen McConnell on 2019-09-11
Graham Co.
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Recorded by: Owen McConnell on 2019-09-10
Graham Co.
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Recorded by: Owen McConnell on 2019-07-28
Graham Co.
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