Moths of North Carolina
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View PDFGracillariidae Members: 10 NC Records

Cameraria saccharella (Braun, 1908) - No Common Name



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Taxonomy
Superfamily: Gracillarioidea Family: GracillariidaeSubfamily: LithocolletinaeP3 Number: 330379.00 MONA Number: 836.00
Comments: Cameraria is a genus of leaf-mining micromoths. Many species are stenophagous and specialize on a small number of closely related host species. There are currently more than 50 described species in North America.
Identification
Field Guide Descriptions: Online Photographs: MPG, BugGuide, BOLDTechnical Description, Adults: Braun, 1908.                                                                                 
Adult Markings: The following is Braun's (1908) description based on specimens from Cincinnati, Ohio. The antennae are pale ocherous and ringed with dark coloration beyond the basal third. Several joints toward the tip are also dark. The palpi and face are shining white, and the head tuft is whitish above and golden toward the sides. The thorax and forewings are ocherous. A white stripe on each side of the middle of the thorax is continuous with a very oblique curved white streak at the inner angle of the forewing. This streak, which is sometimes dark margined behind, extends to the fold and is usually prolonged along the fold to unite with the first dorsal streak. The first dorsal streak begins at the basal fifth, is oblique and curved, and extends slightly more than halfway across the wing. The second dorsal streak, at about the middle of the dorsal margin, is also oblique and curved, and near the costa its apex meets that of the first costal streak, which is short, oblique and placed slightly beyond the middle, thus forming an acutely angled, interrupted fascia. The second costal streak at the apical fourth is sometimes almost overlaid with black scales. Above the dorsal cilia is a long oblique white streak. All the streaks are dark margined externally. The apical portion is white and dusted with black. There is considerable variation in the extent of the black dusting, which sometimes extends to the tornus. The marginal line in the cilia is brownish ocherous and the cilia is pale ocherous. The hindwings are pale grayish ocherous with pale ocherous cilia. The abdomen is gray above and pale ocherous below, and the anal tuft ocherous. Features of the forewing that help to distinguish this species from other Cameraria include the presence of oblique costal and dorsal streaks, an oblique white streak or patch at the base of the dorsal margin, and two fasciae that are distinctly angulated. Braun (1980) has color illustrations of species in the eastern US that are useful for comparing closely related forms.
Wingspan: 5-7 mm (Braun, 1908).
Adult ID Requirements: Identifiable from good quality photos of unworn specimens.
Immatures and Development: Braun (1908) found the mines to be very common on sugar maples in Ohio, with as many as 25 or 30 mines sometimes occurring on one leaf. The larvae create elongated irregular blotch mines on the upper surfaces of leaves. The frass pattern appears to vary markedly, perhaps depending on the host species. Braun (1908) illustrated a mine with narrow, central, branching frass deposits. Eiseman (2019) reared an adult from an elongate, widening mine on Red Maple with the frass deposited in a central band. On two other occasions he raised adults from an elongate or branching mine on Southern Sugar Maple with some of the frass centrally deposited, and some along the margins as in C. aceriella. The cocoon was evident only when the mines were backlit.
Larvae ID Requirements: Identifiable from good quality photos, especially where associated with known host plants.
Distribution in North Carolina
Distribution: Cameraria saccharella occurs from southern Ontario and Maine, southward and westward to Illinois, Ohio, and North Carolina. Our records from North Carolina as of 2019 are from Haywood Co. (BOLD specimen), and Scotland and Wake Cos.
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Flight Dates:
 High Mountains (HM) ≥ 4,000 ft.
 Low Mountains (LM) < 4,000 ft.
 Piedmont (Pd)
 Coastal Plain (CP)

Click on graph to enlarge
Immature Dates:
 High Mountains (HM) ≥ 4,000 ft.
 Low Mountains (LM) < 4,000 ft.
 Piedmont (Pd)
 Coastal Plain (CP)

Click on graph to enlarge
Flight Comments: Populations appear to be bivoltine, with adults appearing shortly after the spring leaf-out and later in late-summer or early fall. Eiseman (2019) raised adults from mines that were collected in May, July, and August from North Carolina.
Habitats and Life History
Habitats: This species feeds on several species of maples. It likely occurs in urban landscapes, as well as hardwood and mixed hardwood-pine forests throughout the state.
Larval Host Plants: The documented host plants include Southern Sugar Maple (A. floridanum), Black Maple (A. nigrum), Red Maple (A. rubrum), Silver Maple (A. saccharinum), and Sugar Maple (A. saccharum) (Braun, 1908; Eiseman, 2019).
Wikipedia
See also Habitat Account for General Maple Forests
Status in North Carolina
Natural Heritage Program Status:
Natural Heritage Program Ranks: GNR SU
State Protection:
Comments:

 Photo Gallery for Cameraria saccharella - No common name

Photos: 19

Recorded by: Jim Petranka, John Petranka, Becky Elkin, and Steve Hall on 2021-09-28
Durham Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka, John Petranka, Becky Elkin, and Steve Hall on 2021-09-28
Durham Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka, John Petranka, Becky Elkin, and Steve Hall on 2021-09-28
Durham Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2021-07-24
Jackson Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2021-07-24
Jackson Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2021-06-27
McDowell Co.
Comment: Occupied mine was on Red Maple; frass in center of mine (see companion backlit photo)
Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2021-06-27
McDowell Co.
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Recorded by: Dean Furbish on 2021-06-12
Wake Co.
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Recorded by: Dean Furbish on 2021-06-12
Wake Co.
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Recorded by: Kyle Kittelberger on 2020-05-03
Wake Co.
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Recorded by: Kyle Kittelberger on 2020-05-03
Wake Co.
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Recorded by: Tracy S. Feldman on 2019-05-24
Wake Co.
Comment: A view of a leaf of Acer floridanum with an occupied upper-surface blotch mine.
Recorded by: Tracy S. Feldman on 2019-05-24
Wake Co.
Comment: A view of the underside of a leaf of Acer floridanum with an occupied upper-surface blotch mine.
Recorded by: Tracy S. Feldman and Charley Eiseman on 2017-08-02
Scotland Co.
Comment: An adult that emerged from a mine on Acer floridanum (see companion photo of the mine from 2017-07-18). Photo by Charley Eiseman.
Recorded by: Tracy S. Feldman on 2017-07-18
Scotland Co.
Comment: An upper-surface blotch mine on Acer floridanum (see companion photo of the adult that emerged from this mine on 2017-08-02).
Recorded by: Tracy S. Feldman on 2017-07-18
Scotland Co.
Comment: An upper-surface blotch mine on Acer floridanum (see companion photo of the adult that emerged from this mine on 2017-08-02).
Recorded by: Tracy S. Feldman on 2017-07-18
Scotland Co.
Comment: An upper-surface blotch mine on Acer floridanum (see companion photo of the adult that emerged from this mine on 2017-08-02).
Recorded by: Tracy S. Feldman and Charley Eiseman on 2016-08-13
Durham Co.
Comment: Leaf mines were collected on August 3rd, 2016, and the adult emerged on August 13th.
Recorded by: Harry Wilson on 2015-06-20
Wake Co.
Comment: