Moths of North Carolina
Scientific Name:
Common Name:
Family (Alpha):
« »
View PDFTischeriidae Members: 7 NC Records

Astrotischeria solidagonifoliella Clemens, 1859 - No Common Name



view caption

view caption

view caption

view caption
Taxonomy
Superfamily: Tischerioidea Family: TischeriidaeSubfamily: [Tischeriinae]Tribe: [Tischeriini]P3 Number: 230005.00 MONA Number: 156.00
Comments: The genus Astrotischeria contains 13 Nearctic species that are leafminers, and most specialize on members of the Asteraceae.
Identification
Field Guide Descriptions: Online Photographs: MPG, BugGuide, BOLDTechnical Description, Adults: Braun (1972)Technical Description, Immature Stages: Braun (1972)                                                                                 
Adult Markings: The following is Braun's (1972) verbatim description of adults based on studies of 89 specimens from throughout the range of the species. Head varying in color from cream to pale ocherous, antennae whitish, becoming darker toward apex, ciliate in both sexes, cilia very long in male, long in female. Fore wings variable in ground color, pale cream or whitish to ocherous; markings formed by groups of dark-tipped scales with sometimes a scattering of fuscous scales over the entire wing surface; there is great variation in the presence of the patches of darker scales, some of which may form clearly defined markings; in some specimens, there is no grouping of dark scales, but merely a dusting of fuscous scales, a little denser along costa, in the area where the costal patch (as described by Clemens) lies. Well-marked specimens may be described as follows: a small spot in disc at about one third the wing length, with a few scattered dark scales or a small spot before it; a line of dark scales along dorsum, which may form a well-defined spot at mid-dorsum; a relatively large patch just above tornus, costal margin more or less darkened with fuscous scales, which may form a dark spot on costa opposite the space between the mid-dorsal and tornal spots; apical area of the wing darkened with scattered fuscous scales, somewhat grouped at apex and on termen. Cilia pale cream or whitish ocherous. Hind wings whitish to pale fuscous ocherous. Legs whitish, shaded with fuscous in darker specimens. Abdomen whitish to pale brownish ocherous. Astrotischeria solidagonifoliella varies markedly in the degree to which dark marking are present on the fore wings and cannot always be reliably separated from other Astrotischeria. This species lacks the oblique dark bar or streak from the basal third of costa that is usually evident in A. astericola and A. ambrosiaeella. Positive identifications are best achieved by using either genitalia, molecular markers, or by finding leaf mines and rearing adults. Astrotischeria species have non-overlapping host preferences and most locality records in the eastern US are based on leaf mines or adults that were reared from mines.
Adult Structural Features: Braun (1972) provides keys to Astrotischeria species based on male and female genitalia. Her verbatim descriptions of the genitalia follow. Entire vinculum strongly sclerotized, tapering anteriorly to the narrowed rounded tip; harpe nearly divided, costal area short, heavily sclerotized and modified into a short curved tooth, cucullus narrow, apically with heavy setae; at base, adjacent to anellus, a short acicular process; anellus with ventral sinus; aedeagus forking before middle, the forks swollen toward tip, then diverging and sharply acuminate; socii lobed, setose, and concealing the small and acutely triangular uncus forks. Female genitalia: peg setae of ovipositor short, thick, and dark pigmented, lateral lobes small, outer margins thickened; sex opening without sclerotized margins; posterior apophyses slender; arms of patibulum diverging from middle of anterior margin of eighth sternite; prela long and slender, near tips a membranous elongate projection.
Immatures and Development: A female deposits a bluish iridescent egg on the upper surface of a leaf and the hatchling initially mines a small blotch. As the mine expands, a nidus is constructed near the beginning of the mine and silk is spun that leads toward the nidus from the enlarging area of the mine. The nidus becomes more pronounced with time as additional silk lining is added. Larvae produce upper-surface mines and the underside of the leaf is normally green or slightly tarnished brown. At emergence, the pupa pierces through the lower epidermis of the leaf adjacent to the nidus (Braun, 1972).
Larvae ID Requirements: Identifiable from good quality photos, especially where associated with known host plants.
Distribution in North Carolina
Distribution: Astrotischeria solidagonifoliella in found in eastern North America from southern Canada southward to Missouri, Arkansas, and North Carolina. As of 2019, we currently have only a few records for North Carolina that include Madison, Scotland, Wake, and Durham Counties (BugGuide). Searches for leaf mines will likely yield many new locality records for the state.
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Flight Dates:
 High Mountains (HM) ≥ 4,000 ft.
 Low Mountains (LM) < 4,000 ft.
 Piedmont (Pd)
 Coastal Plain (CP)

Click on graph to enlarge
Immature Dates:
 High Mountains (HM) ≥ 4,000 ft.
 Low Mountains (LM) < 4,000 ft.
 Piedmont (Pd)
 Coastal Plain (CP)

Click on graph to enlarge
Flight Comments: Based on records in Braun (1972) the adults are most active from May-September. Two leaf mines were collected in mid and late October in North Carolina that each contained what appeared to be an overwintering pupa.
Habitats and Life History
Habitats: The larvae feed entirely on goldenrods (Solidago) spp. and are found in a variety of habitats with the host species. These include open, disturbed habitats such as roadsides and abandoned lots, old fields, and forests and forest edges.
Larval Host Plants: The larvae mine the leaves of goldenrods. Documented host species include Tall Goldenrod (S. altissima), Bluestem Goldenrod (S. caesia), Canada Goldenrod (S. canadensis), Hairy Goldenrod (S. hispida), Early Goldenrod (S. juncea), Gray Goldenrod (S. nemoralis), Wrinkle-leaf Goldenrod (S. rugosa), Stiff Goldenrod (S. rigida), Autumn Goldenrod (Solidago sphacelata), and Elmleaf Goldenrod (S. ulmifolia).
Observation Methods: This species appears to rarely visit lights, and most records are based on leaf mines or adults raised from leaf mines. We recommend searching for mines on goldenrod during the summer and early autumn months, and rearing adults whenever possible.
Wikipedia
See also Habitat Account for General Successional Fields and Forblands
Status in North Carolina
Natural Heritage Program Status:
Natural Heritage Program Ranks: GNR SU
State Protection: Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.
Comments: This small leafminer has been undercollected within the state and may be more abundant and widespread than our current records suggest. We currently do not have sufficient information to assess its conservation status.

 Photo Gallery for Astrotischeria solidagonifoliella - No common name

Photos: 14

Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2020-10-19
Madison Co.
Comment: Upper-surface mine with a pupa was on Tall Goldenrod (S. altissima) at edge of mowed field.
Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2020-09-24
Madison Co.
Comment: An adult that emerged from a mine on solidago altissima. Mine collected on 2020-09-20 (see companion photo); adult emerged 4 days later.
Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2020-09-24
Madison Co.
Comment: An adult that emerged from a mine on solidago altissima. Mine collected on 2020-09-20 (see companion photo); adult emerged 4 days later.
Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2020-09-20
Madison Co.
Comment: An upper-surface leaf mine on Tall Goldenrod (Solidago altissima).
Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2020-09-20
Madison Co.
Comment: Backlit image of an upper-surface leaf mine on Tall Goldenrod (Solidago altissima).
Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2019-10-28
Madison Co.
Comment: This upper-surface leaf mine was on Tall Goldenrod (Solidago altissima). Note the white nidus on the left.
Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2019-10-28
Madison Co.
Comment: A backlit image of a mine (see companion photo) that shows a pupa inside a nidus.
Recorded by: Tracy S. Feldman on 2018-07-20
Wake Co.
Comment: Mines on Solidago canadensis--mostly upper-surface, blotch mines.
Recorded by: Tracy S. Feldman on 2018-07-20
Wake Co.
Comment: Mines on Solidago canadensis--mostly upper-surface, blotch mines.
Recorded by: Tracy S. Feldman on 2018-07-20
Wake Co.
Comment: Mines on Solidago canadensis--mostly upper-surface, blotch mines.
Recorded by: Tracy S. Feldman on 2018-05-29
Durham Co.
Comment: Mines on Solidago canadensis--mostly upper-surface blotch mines. Not reared.
Recorded by: Tracy S. Feldman on 2018-05-29
Durham Co.
Comment: Mines on Solidago canadensis--mostly upper-surface blotch mines. Not reared.
Recorded by: Tracy S. Feldman on 2017-08-21
Scotland Co.
Comment: Mine on Solidago nemoralis--mostly upper surface blotch mine.
Recorded by: Tracy S. Feldman on 2017-08-21
Scotland Co.
Comment: Mine on Solidago nemoralis--mostly upper surface blotch mine.