The Dragonflies and Damselflies of North Carolina
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North Carolina's 188 Odonate species

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Related Species in COENAGRIONIDAE: Number of records added in 2021 = 0

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Hagen's Bluet (Enallagma hageni) by John Petranka, Sally Gewalt
Compare with: Familiar Bluet   Atlantic Bluet  
Identification Tips: Move the cursor over the image, or tap the image if using a mobile device, to reveal ID Tips.
Note: these identification tips apply specifically to mature males; features may differ in immature males and in females.

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mapClick on county for list of all its records for Hagen's Bluet
flight charts
distribution Essentially throughout the mountains, and likely the extreme upper Piedmont foothills. Not surprisingly, NC lies at the southern end of the species' range, it not having yet been recorded from SC, and just at one site in extreme northeastern GA. There is a surprisingly wide gap in records in the central mountains, and fairly heavily worked Buncombe and Madison counties lack a record.
abundance Uncommon to locally fairly common in the mountains, but very rare in the upper parts of Piedmont foothill counties. Interestingly, there is a count of 39 individuals from Macon County; thus, it isn't overly rare in parts of the southern mountains. Paulson (2011) says "Often most common species at large northern lakes." Of course, such is not the case in NC, at the southern edge of the range.
flight The NC records in the mountains fall between mid-June and late August, though the flight there likely starts in May. The few Piedmont records are only for late May and mid-June.
habitat Ponds, small lakes, and other open water with much emergent vegetation; often at bogs and marshes.

See also Habitat Account for Montane Herbaceous Ponds
behavior
comments Though there are numerous dragonflies that occur in NC only in the mountains, there are very few such damselflies with this type of range. The lack of records in the central mountain counties is puzzling, though this may represent poor coverage in its pond-like habitats.
state_status
S_rank S3
fed_status
G_rank G5
date_spread [Overwinter:] [Date Spread:] [No Late Date:] [Split on Feb:] [Default:]
synonym
other_name
Species account update: LeGrand on 2020-05-18 15:54:23

Photo Gallery for Hagen's Bluet   9 photos are shown. Other NC Galleries:    Jeff Pippen    Will Cook    Ted Wilcox
Photo 1 by: Mark Shields

Comment: Jackson, 2018-06-27, The Village Green, Cashiers - male at small creek
Photo 2 by: John Petranka, Barbara McRae, Sally Gewalt

Comment: Macon, 2017-07-20, Cliffside Lake at Cliffside Lake Recreation Area, ca. 4 miles NW of Highlands. - Mostly males, but several mating pairs.
Photo 3 by: John Petranka, Barbara McRae, Sally Gewalt

Comment: Macon, 2017-07-20, Cliffside Lake at Cliffside Lake Recreation Area, ca. 4 miles NW of Highlands. - Mostly males, but several mating pairs.
Photo 4 by: Jim Petranka

Comment: Avery, 2016-07-15, In permanent pond with emergent vegetation.
Photo 5 by: John Petranka

Comment: Alleghany, 2016-06-20, Pond along Blue Ridge Parkway about 4.3 mi. north of US 21. Junction of BRP with Mountain View Rd. (State Rd. 1463). Male. Photos.
Photo 6 by: John Petranka, Sally Gewalt

Comment: Watauga, 2015-06-30, Meat Camp Creek Environmental Studies Area. - Males.
Photo 7 by: Doug Johnston, Vin Stanton

Comment: Swain, 2013-07-16, Ferebee Park, Nantahala River - Male
Photo 8 by: Curtis Smalling

Comment: Watauga, 2010-06-20, Meat Camp Creek Environmental Studies Area - numerous pairs
Photo 9 by: Curtis Smalling

Comment: Watauga, 2010-06-20, Meat Camp Creek Environmental Studies Area - numerous pairs