Hoppers of North Carolina:
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DELPHACIDAE Members: NC Records

Stenocranus brunneus - No Common Name



© Kyle Kittelberger- side view; note rounded head

© Kyle Kittelberger- note coloration

© Kyle Kittelberger- underside

© Ken Kneidel- female
Taxonomy
Family: DELPHACIDAESubfamily: Stenocraninae
Taxonomic Author: Beamer, 1946
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: A dark species, with dark wings that typically have the M veins that strongly curve near the wing tips outlined in black as well. The amount of black on the wings can vary among individuals, and males are darker than females. This species has a dark, reddish underside of the abdomen and thorax. The face is black with a pale midline. The head is somewhat rounded and lacks the sharpness that other members of this genus have. This is a small species, smaller than other members of this genus, being 3.5-4.5 mm. (UDEL)

See here for a nice set of images of a pinned specimen.

Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Distribution: Eastern United States (UDEL)
Abundance: Recorded primarily from the Piedmont, as well as from a few counties in the mountains and coastal plain; probably more abundant in the right habitat.
Seasonal Occurrence
Jan
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Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Has been found in grassy and open areas near mixed hardwood forest; areas with grass or sedge.
Plant Associates: Carex cumberlandensis, C. gracilescens, C. radfordii, C. pensylvanica, C. stricta, C. intumescens var fernaldii (Cyperaceae) (UDEL)
Behavior: Can be attracted at night with a light.
Comment: While S. brunneus is a fairly distinctive species, it could be confused with a couple other Stenocranus. It is most likely to be confused with S. acutus, which has similar coloration. However, the key differentiating factor is the shape of the head. In S. acutus, the head is very pointed, forming a sharp angle when viewed from the side; however, in S. brunneus the head is more rounded and lacks the sharpness. Additionally, S. acutus has a longer, narrower body shape than brunneus. The other similar species is S. lautus, which typically is not as dark as S. brunneus, with a different wing pattern. The two species are also noticeable different in size, with lautus typically around 5.0 mm in length and brunneus less than 5.0 mm, listed as 3.5-4.5 mm.
Status: Native
Global and State Rank:

Species Photo Gallery for Stenocranus brunneus No Common Name

Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: 4 mm female, sweep of grassy area
Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: 4 mm female, sweep of grassy area
Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: 4 mm female, sweep of grassy area
Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: 4 mm female, sweep of grassy area
Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: 4 mm female, sweep of grassy area
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment: mixed hardwood forest
Photo by: Rob Van Epps
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: Attracted to UV light. Suburban yard near woods.
Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Yancey Co.
Comment: female 3.6 mm, sweep of low vegetation adjacent to a bog. [Confirmed via C. Bartlett]
Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Yancey Co.
Comment: female 3.6 mm, sweep of low vegetation adjacent to a bog
Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Yancey Co.
Comment: female 3.6 mm, sweep of low vegetation adjacent to a bog
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Rockingham Co.
Comment: grassy area near mixed hardwood forest and a pond
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Rockingham Co.
Comment: grassy area near mixed hardwood forest and a pond
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Rockingham Co.
Comment: grassy area near mixed hardwood forest and a pond
Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: Caught Sweeping
Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: Attracted to Black Light
Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: Attracted to Black Light