Hoppers of North Carolina:
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DELPHACIDAE Members: NC Records

Stenocranus lautus - No Common Name



© Kyle Kittelberger- note length of hind tibia
and tarsus

© Kyle Kittelberger- note length of hind tibia
and tarsus

© Kyle Kittelberger

© Kyle Kittelberger- note black spot on subcosta
Taxonomy
Family: DELPHACIDAESubfamily: Stenocraninae
Taxonomic Author: Van Duzee, 1897
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: A brownish species with a white median dorsal line. The wing venation toward the tips is dark, varying in width and pattern among individuals (see pics above). This species very closely resembles S. vittatus and in some instances there may not be a way to differentiate between the two. Charles Bartlett notes that he is "not sure that the two can be consistently separated without tails, but there is some coloration difference" (pers. comment). Hamilton (2006) notes that in S. vittatus, the dorsomedial length of the hind tibia is greater than that of the hind tarsus, whereas in S. lautus the lengths are essentially the same. Furthermore, males of S. vittatus are 4.5 mm or longer while females are 5.0 mm or longer, while adults of S. lautus are reported at 5-6 mm in length. See vittatus and lautus for comparisons of pinned specimens. As in S. vittatus, the head is rounded and the face is dark with a pale midline. (UDEL), (Beamer)
Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Distribution: Eastern and central United States and Canada; also Cuba (UDEL)
Abundance: Somewhat common to uncommon, though typically recorded in low numbers. A majority of records come from the Piedmont and mountains.
Seasonal Occurrence
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec
Habitats and Life History
Habitats:
Plant Associates: Carex lurida, C. cumberlandensis, Cyperus esculentus, Cy. strigosus (Cyperaceae) (UDEL)
Behavior: Can be attracted at night with a light.
Comment: NOTE: As mentioned above, S. lautus and S. vittatus can be very difficult to distinguish from one another. Since lautus is much more common than vittatus, on default individuals that fall in this category can be tentatively identified as lautus. However, having a clear view of the side, showing the hind tibia and tarsus would allow for a proper identification.

S. lautus could also be confused with some individuals of S. brunneus, which typically is darker than lautus. S. brunneus is also typically smaller than lautus, being less than 5 mm in length, listed as 3.5-4.5 mm.

Status: Native
Global and State Rank:

Species Photo Gallery for Stenocranus lautus No Common Name

Photo by: Bo Sullivan
Ashe Co.
Comment: male, photographed by K. Kittelberger
Photo by: Bo Sullivan
Ashe Co.
Comment: male, photographed by K. Kittelberger
Photo by: Bo Sullivan
Ashe Co.
Comment: male, photographed by K. Kittelberger
Photo by: Rob Van Epps
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: specimen photographed by Kyle Kittelberger; 4.8 mm
Photo by: Rob Van Epps
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: specimen photographed by Kyle Kittelberger; 4.8 mm
Photo by: Rob Van Epps
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: specimen photographed by Kyle Kittelberger; 4.8 mm
Photo by: Mark Shields
Onslow Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Moore Co.
Comment: sandhills (pine forest) habitat with lots of shrubby vegetation
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
New Hanover Co.
Comment: open woodlands, pine dominated
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Paul Scharf
Wake Co.
Comment: brushy habitat near mixed hardwood forest
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Paul Scharf
Wake Co.
Comment: brushy habitat near mixed hardwood forest
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment: open forest habitat, near mixed hardwoods; on a lawn
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment: open forest habitat, near mixed hardwoods; on a lawn
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment: open forest habitat, near mixed hardwoods; on a lawn
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Moore Co.
Comment: sandhills (pine forest) habitat with lots of shrubby vegetation
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Moore Co.
Comment: sandhills (pine forest) habitat with lots of shrubby vegetation
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Rockingham Co.
Comment: grassy area near mixed hardwood forest and pond
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Rockingham Co.
Comment: grassy area near mixed hardwood forest and pond
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Washington Co.
Comment: open forest habitat
Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: Caught Sweeping