Hoppers of North Carolina:
Spittlebugs, Leafhoppers, Treehoppers, and Planthoppers
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CALISCELIDAE Members: NC Records

Bruchomorpha oculata - No Common Name



© Kyle Kittelberger

© Kyle Kittelberger

© Kyle Kittelberger- nymph

© Kyle Kittelberger- nymph
Taxonomy
Family: CALISCELIDAE
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: A uniformly dark species, typically blackish in color, with only a trace of a pale median stripe that extends from the head onto the thorax. The 'nose' or head projection is slightly bulbous and protrudes down and out, but is not as long as that of B. nodosa; also note that the head of B. oculata is flat and straight on the top, but not as short and flat as that of B. tristis. Nymphs resemble the adults, showing the characteristic head projection. Nymphs are brownish in color and can have a thin, pale median line extending across the whole body. Both adults and nymphs have yellowish legs.
Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Distribution: Found across the United States, as far west as the Rocky Mountains; also in Canada (UDEL)
Abundance: The most common and abundant piglet in NC, the one most frequently encountered. Recorded across the state, with a majority of the records in the Piedmont. Can be locally common where found.
Seasonal Occurrence
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec
Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Has been found in grassy, brushy, field-type habitat and forest edge.
Plant Associates: Eragrostis curvula (weeping lovegrass) (UDEL)
Behavior:
Comment: Sometimes adults are macropterous and have very pronounced wings, differing from the typically brachypterous individuals that have very reduced wings.
Status: Native
Global and State Rank:

Species Photo Gallery for Bruchomorpha oculata No Common Name

Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: 4 mm, sweep of low vegetation in detention basin
Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: 4 mm, sweep of low vegetation in detention basin
Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: 4 mm, sweep of low vegetation in detention basin
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Vance Co.
Comment: Field/forest edge habitat. A nymph
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Vance Co.
Comment: Field/forest edge habitat. A nymph
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Paul Scharf
Wake Co.
Comment: grassy habitat and microstygium
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Surry Co.
Comment: grassy, brushy habitat near forest edge
Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: Caught Sweeping
Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: Caught Sweeping
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: grassy/brushy habitat on the side of the road
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Surry Co.
Comment: grassy, brushy habitat near forest edge
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Surry Co.
Comment: grassy, brushy habitat near forest edge
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Vance Co.
Comment: Field/forest edge habitat. A nymph
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Paul Scharf
Wake Co.
Comment: tall grassy habitat
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Paul Scharf
Wake Co.
Comment: tall grassy habitat
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Paul Scharf
Wake Co.
Comment: tall grassy habitat