Hoppers of North Carolina:
Spittlebugs, Leafhoppers, Treehoppers, and Planthoppers
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CIXIIDAE Members: NC Records

Pentastiridius habeckorum - No Common Name


No image for this species.
Taxonomy
Family: CIXIIDAE
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: A dark species, with the color of the vertex and mesonotum varying from stramineous to testaceous. The mesonotal carinae are colored as follows: lateral pair are mostly fuscous, intermediate pair are yellowish, and the median pair are mostly orange. The vertex is very broad, and the face is fuscous. The wings are uniformly light to medium brown, with costal and apical cells a darker brown color; the costa and stigma are whitish to stramineous. Adult males are 6.7-7.2 mm long. (Mead & Kramer, 1982)

Male genitalia diagrams from Mead & Kramer: UDEL.

Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Distribution: Known only from three counties in North Carolina, one county in South Carolina, and one county in Virginia (Mead & Kramer, 1982)
Abundance: A rare species, known in the state from only a handful of records from three counties.
Seasonal Occurrence
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Habitats and Life History
Habitats:
Plant Associates: Reported from sweeping cane (Arundinaria sp.) (Mead & Kramer, 1982)
Behavior:
Comment: One of two species in this genus found in North America, the other, P. cinnamomeus, has been found as far South as Delaware and Maryland (UDEL). The two species are extremely similar morphologically with some minor differences. P. habeckorum is an overall lighter shade of brown, particularly on the wings, while P. cinnamomeus has wings that are a blackish-brown color. Additionally, habeckorum is distinctly larger, with males being over 6.5 mm long while males of cinnamomeus are under 6.0 mm. There are also slight differences in the genitalia and metatarsite (see Mead & Kramer, 1982 for more details).
Status: Native
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