Hoppers of North Carolina:
Spittlebugs, Leafhoppers, Treehoppers, and Planthoppers
Scientific Name: Search Common Name:
Family (Alpha):
« »
CICADELLIDAE Members: NC Records

Crumbana arundinea - No Common Name



© Kyle Kittelberger- note wing pattern

© Kyle Kittelberger- note vertex shape & spots

© Kyle Kittelberger- note coloration

© Kyle Kittelberger- note orange spots
Taxonomy
Family: CICADELLIDAESubfamily: DeltocephalinaeTribe: Deltocephalini
Taxonomic Author: (Crumb, 1915)
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: The vertex is creamy, with a pair of black triangular spots near the apex and one on each side of the eyes. There is a pair of large irregular, fuscous to orange-colored spots that form a somewhat broken band between the anterior margins of the eyes; these fuscous spots, contrasting with the smaller black spots along the vertex margin, are characteristic of this species. There is also a pair of oblique fuscous dashes on the base of the vertex. The pronotum is fuscous with five somewhat indistinct pale longitudinal bands (this tends to result in there being four orange longitudinal bands); there is an irregular dark spot behind each eye, along the anterior margin. The scutellum has a spot at the apex (not always present) and a dark spot in each basal angle. The wings are fuscous, with the nervures and venation a contrasting whitish color, margined with fuscous. There are three conspicuous dark, blackish spots on each wing (elytron): one on the middle of the clavus, one on the middle of the costal margin, and the other on the outer (lower) apical cell along the costa. There is a large pale area between the two dark spots along the costal margin, resulting in a fuscous arc of cells connecting each dot. The face is pale with fucous markings and heavy dark arcs. The vertex is bluntly produced, long and coming to a defined pointed apex, almost one-fourth longer in the middle than the width between the eyes. The female pregenital sternite is three times as long as the preceeding sternite, with the posterior margin trilobate. The lateral angles are roundingly produced in definite lobes, between which is a broadly rounded shorter median lobe; there is a distinctly rounded notch on either side of this lobe. The male subgenital plates are long, exceeding the valve by more than twice its length; the plates are concavely narrowed (outer margin) and produced into long acute tips. Adults are around 3.5 mm long. (DeLong 1926, DeLong 1946)

For diagrams of the genitalia of this species, see: 3I. For an image of a pinned specimen, see: BG.

Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Distribution: Eastern United States, east of the Mississippi River: IL south to LA, east to FL and NC. (3I)
Abundance: A locally common species throughout the Coastal Plain; likely found throughout this region and perhaps the eastern part of the Piedmont.
Seasonal Occurrence
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec
Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Has been found in open habitat near mixed hardwood forest edge; also stream-side habitat where cane is present (DeLong 1948).
Plant Associates: Switchcane (Arundinaria tecta;
Behavior: Can be attracted at night with a light.
Comment: This is the sole member of the genus Crumbana. This species is very similar to Sanctanus tectus in coloration and pattern, with tectus actually described as resembling arundineus but seemingly related to other Sanctanus species (DeLong and Hershberger 1946), and both species actually share the same host plant. Crumbana though tends to be paler overall, with a more pointed vertex that has a different spot pattern compared to Sanctanus tectus: two large orange-fuscous spots with two symmetric small black spots along the vertex margin, with the pair at the apex shaped like triangles. In contrast, tectus has two large black spots on the vertex, and there are black patches along the posterior margin of the vertex and anterior margin of the pronotum. The face pattern is also different, being darker with a dividing pale band in tectus and less dark but more uniformly colored in arundineus. The female pregenital sternites of both species also differ, with the sternite trilobate in arundineus and truncate in tectus.

Nymphs are reported to have a two-generation life-cycle, and have been taken in abundance in early July and in August (DeLong 1926).

NOTE: There appears to potentially be a cryptic species in the Coastal Plain that has a combination of characteristics from both Crumbana arundinea and Sanctanus tectus. The large fuscous marks on the head are darker than in Crumbana, the vertex is not quite as pointed and long as Crumbana, there are three black marks along the costal margin of each wing (similar to S. tectus), there are incomplete blackish marks along the anterior margin of the pronotum (and the orange coloration on the pronotum looks closer to S. tectus), the legs are largely pale with some black markings (like Crumbana), and the face is whitish with scattered small black marks (unlike either species). Additionally, the pregenital sternite is lobate and does not match that of either Crumbana or S. tectus.

Status: Native
Global and State Rank:

Species Photo Gallery for Crumbana arundinea No Common Name

Photo by: Scott Bolick
Pender Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Scott Bolick
Pender Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Paul Scharf
Gates Co.
Comment: open, grassy area near mixed hardwood forest. Male 3.4 mm long
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Paul Scharf
Gates Co.
Comment: open, grassy area near mixed hardwood forest. Male 3.4 mm long
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Paul Scharf
Gates Co.
Comment: open, grassy area near mixed hardwood forest. Male 3.4 mm long
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Paul Scharf
Gates Co.
Comment: open, grassy area near mixed hardwood forest. Male 3.4 mm long
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Paul Scharf
Gates Co.
Comment: open, grassy area near mixed hardwood forest. Male 3.4 mm long
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Paul Scharf
Gates Co.
Comment: open, grassy area near mixed hardwood forest
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Paul Scharf
Beaufort Co.
Comment: open, grassy habitat surrounded by pine and mixed hardwood forest
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Paul Scharf
Beaufort Co.
Comment: open, grassy habitat surrounded by pine and mixed hardwood forest
Photo by: J. Bolling Sullivan
Jones Co.
Comment: males
Photo by: J. Bolling Sullivan
Jones Co.
Comment: males
Photo by: J. Bolling Sullivan
Jones Co.
Comment: males
Photo by: J. Bolling Sullivan
Jones Co.
Comment: males
Photo by: J. Bolling Sullivan
Jones Co.
Comment: males
Photo by: J. Bolling Sullivan
Jones Co.
Comment: males
Photo by: Bo Sullivan
Carteret Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Bo Sullivan
Carteret Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Bo Sullivan
Carteret Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Erich Hofmann
Craven Co.
Comment: male; https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/46406484; photographed by K. Kittelberger
Photo by: Erich Hofmann
Craven Co.
Comment: male; https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/46406484; photographed by K. Kittelberger
Photo by: Erich Hofmann
Craven Co.
Comment: male; https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/46406484; photographed by K. Kittelberger
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: open to mixed hardwood forest
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: open to mixed hardwood forest