Moths of North Carolina
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Martyringa Members:
23 NC Records

Martyringa ravicapitis Hodges, 1960 - Himalayan Grain Moth


Taxonomy
Superfamily: Gelechioidea Family: LecithoceridaeP3 Number: 420028.00 MONA Number: 1066.00
Comments: Martyringa is a small genus with four recognized species that occur in North America, India, and Southeast Asia. Hodges described Martyringa ravicapitis in 1960 from two reared Louisiana specimens. This species is an introduced grain moth from India and Asia. Meyrick (1910) described an essentially identical species as Anchonoma xeraula from India (later transferred to the genus Martyringa). Some workers treat M. ravicapitis as a junior synonym of M. xeraula. However, others treat M. ravicapitis and M. xeraula as two separate species (see MPG). Until this issue is resolved, we continue to recognize M. ravicapitis.
Identification
Field Guide Descriptions: Online Photographs: MPG, BugGuide, iNaturalist, Google, BAMONA, GBIF                                                                                 
Adult Markings: The following description is based on Hodges (1960). The labial palp, head, thorax, and forewing are ocherous and heavily overlaid with dark fuscous. The second segment of the labial palp is dark fuscous on the basal two-thirds on the outer side, and somewhat fuscous near the base of the inner side. The third segment has a fuscous annulus on the basal half. The scape of the antenna is fuscous except for a narrow terminal ocherous annulus. The shaft is annulated with narrow, fuscous rings that become ocherous distally. The forewing has two black spots at the basal third. The anterior one ends where the inner, posterior one begins, and is preceded by a patch of skewed scales. The anterior black spot is followed by an ocherous bar and a third black spot at the end of the cell. A series of two or three fine longitudinal black lines are often present on the outer third of the wing. There is a wavy subterminal line that is W-shaped. The apex is ocherous. The cilia are fuscous basally and lighter gray distally from the apex to the tornus. The hindwing is fuscous and the cilia fuscous with ocherous tips. The legs are blackish fuscous outwardly, with ocherous annuli at the tips of the segments, and at the middle of the hind tibia. This species resembles a dulled-down version of M. latipennis, but the paired black spots at one-third are displaced relative to one another, and the subterminal line is more jagged and W-shaped. In M. latipennis the two paired spots are about equidistant from a reference point such as the wing base, and the subterminal line is less jagged, with the line running perpendicular to the costa before angulating posteriorly.
Adult Structural Features: Hodges (1974) provides a general description of the genitalia of our two Martyringa species and a summary of traits that can be used to separate the two.
Adult ID Requirements: Identifiable from good quality photos of unworn specimens.
Immatures and Development: Hodges (1974) reported that the larvae were found under rotting boards where they constructed feeding tubes out of frass and silk. Very few details are known about the larval life history.
Distribution in North Carolina
Distribution: Martyringa ravicapitis is found in the southeastern US from North Carolina southward to Florida and westward to Louisiana, Arkansas and eastern Texas. An apparent disjunct is found in New York City and vicinity. As of 2020, our records are from the eastern Piedmont and Coastal Plain.
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Flight Dates:
 High Mountains (HM) ≥ 4,000 ft.
 Low Mountains (LM) < 4,000 ft.
 Piedmont (Pd)
 Coastal Plain (CP)

Click on graph to enlarge
Flight Comments: Adults have been observed between March and October in different areas of the range, with no strong seasonal peak in activity. As of 2020, our records span from late May to early October, with evidence of double-brooding in the Piedmont.
Habitats and Life History
Habitats: The habitats are poorly documented. Expect to find this species in decomposing organic matter such as rotting logs or compose piles. It also occasionally exploits stored grain.
Larval Host Plants: This species is a minor pest in stored grain and also feeds on detritus and its associated organisms (Hodges, 1974; Robinson et al., 2010)
Observation Methods: The adults are attracted to lights.
Wikipedia
Status in North Carolina
Natural Heritage Program Status:
Natural Heritage Program Ranks: GNR SNA
State Protection:
Comments: This is an exotic species that does not merit protection.

 Photo Gallery for Martyringa ravicapitis - Himalayan Grain Moth

Photos: 19

Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2022-07-11
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2022-07-09
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2022-06-11
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: John Petranka on 2022-05-28
Orange Co.
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Recorded by: Dean Furbish on 2021-09-20
Wake Co.
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Recorded by: Simpson Eason on 2021-06-05
Durham Co.
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Recorded by: Mark Shields on 2021-05-22
Onslow Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2020-10-08
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2020-09-24
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Owen McConnell on 2020-09-05
Durham Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2020-09-03
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2020-09-03
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2020-07-13
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2020-07-01
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Owen McConnell on 2020-06-29
Durham Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2020-06-28
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2020-06-25
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Owen McConnell on 2020-06-04
Durham Co.
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Recorded by: Darryl Willis on 2018-09-09
Cabarrus Co.
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