Moths of North Carolina
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Common Name:
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View PDFCossidae Members: 10 NC Records

Givira francesca (Dyar, 1909) - No Common Name


Taxonomy
Superfamily: Cossoidea Family: CossidaeSubfamily: HypoptinaeTribe: [Hypoptini]P3 Number: 640019.00 MONA Number: 2671.00
Comments: One of at least 14 species of this predominantly western genus to occur in North America, two of which occur in North Carolina.
Identification
Field Guide Descriptions: Online Photographs: MPG, BugGuide, BOLDTechnical Description, Adults: Barnes and McDunnough (1911)                                                                                 
Adult Markings: Forewings brownish gray to gray and evenly covered with transverse black bars and spots, heaviest in the median area. A white comma-shaped mark at the end of the discal cell can be difficult to see through the mottled pattern. The hindwing is gray and unmarked, though with a checked fringe in fresh condition. It has a prominent, triangular thoracic hump and typically holds its furry legs straight out from body at rest. Length from tip of head to apex of forewing at rest averages 14.4 mm (n=8). Very similar in shape and size to G. anna but differentiated from that species by the presence of black on the forewings.
Wingspan: 21-23 mm (Barnes and McDunnough, 1911)
Adult ID Requirements: Identifiable from good quality photos of unworn specimens.
Immatures and Development: Apparently undescribed
Distribution in North Carolina
Distribution: Our records come from the southern half of the Coastal Plain, including the Fall-line Sandhills, and from a nearby area in the eastern Piedmont
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Flight Dates:
 High Mountains (HM) ≥ 4,000 ft.
 Low Mountains (LM) < 4,000 ft.
 Piedmont (Pd)
 Coastal Plain (CP)

Click on graph to enlarge
Flight Comments: Possibly univoltine, with adults flying in the summer from June to August
Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Two records from the Coastal Plain come from sandhills habitats where Longleaf Pine is the dominant species of pine. Loblolly is the most common pine in the area where the Piedmont record was obtained, but Short-leaf and Virginia Pines may also be present.
Larval Host Plants: A pine borer (Heppner, 2003).
Observation Methods: Attracted to lights but since the mouthparts of the adults are rudimentary, they do not feed and consequently do not come to bait or visit flowers.
Wikipedia
Status in North Carolina
Natural Heritage Program Status:
Natural Heritage Program Ranks: GNR [SU]
State Protection: Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it in state parks and on other public lands.
Comments: Likely uncommon in the Coastal Plain and Piedmont. However, limited but consistent sampling in these regions over many years has resulted in few records. Its status in the mountain region not known.

 Photo Gallery for Givira francesca - No common name

Photos: 13

Recorded by: Christine Goforth on 2020-08-04
Wake Co.
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Recorded by: Christine Goforth on 2020-08-04
Wake Co.
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Recorded by: Stephen Hall on 2020-07-27
Orange Co.
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Recorded by: Lenny Lampel on 2020-07-24
Mecklenburg Co.
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Recorded by: Steve Hall on 2020-07-21
Orange Co.
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Recorded by: Steve Hall on 2020-07-21
Orange Co.
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Recorded by: Steve Hall on 2020-07-21
Orange Co.
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Recorded by: Steve Hall on 2020-07-08
Orange Co.
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Recorded by: Mark Shields on 2019-07-24
Onslow Co.
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Recorded by: Parker Backstrom on 2010-08-06
Chatham Co.
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Recorded by: Parker Backstrom on 2010-08-06
Chatham Co.
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Recorded by: Harry Wilson on 2009-06-23
Wake Co.
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Recorded by: ASH on 2007-07-10
Moore Co.
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