Moths of North Carolina
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34 NC Records

Homostinea curviliniella Dietz, 1905 - No Common Name


Taxonomy
Superfamily: Tineoidea Family: TineidaeSubfamily: MeessiinaeTribe: [Meessiini]P3 Number: 300184.00 MONA Number: 301.00
Identification
Field Guide Descriptions: Leckie and Beadle (2018)Online Photographs: MPG, BugGuide, iNaturalist, Google, BAMONA, GBIF, BOLDTechnical Description, Adults: Dietz (1905)                                                                                 
Adult Markings: The following description is based primarily on that of Dietz (1905). The head is ocherous-yellow, while the antenna is fuscous and about two-thirds the wing length. Labial and maxillary palps are grayish fuscous with varying amounts of dark brown. The thorax is dark brown and the ends of the patagia paler. The forewing is sordid yellowish and dusted with fuscous. The basal part of the extreme costa is dark fuscous, and additional fuscous dusting is concentrated along the costa except its last fifth. The extreme base of the inner margin is blackish, and there is a blackish spot (sometimes diffuse and represented by scattered scales) in the costal half of the wing just before the middle. There is a black line in the middle of the apical third that extends posteriorly before angling or curving towards the apex. This is often incomplete and represented by a series of linear dots. The cilia are concolorous with darker scales that are often arranged to form one to three irregular dark lines. The hindwing is grayish fuscous with concolorous cilia that are paler at their base. The legs are yellowish gray, with varying levels of fuscous to dark brown banding. The hind tibia is roughened with coarse long hairs. This is a fairly distinctive species with the dark thoracic region that contrasts sharply with the lighter head tuft and wings. Tinea apicimaculella is similar, but has a row of black spots around the apex and a distinct black orbicular spot.
Wingspan: 9-12 mm (Forbes, 1923)
Adult ID Requirements: Identifiable from good quality photos of unworn specimens.
Immatures and Development: The larval life history is undocumented.
Distribution in North Carolina
Distribution: Homostinea curviliniella is found in eastern North America. Adults have been found in Manitoba and Ontario, as well as throughout much of the eastern US. The range in the US extends from the New England states southward to Florida and westward to Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, Missouri, eastern Minnesota, and as an apparent disjunct in Colorado. This species appears to occur statewide, but is less common in the western mountains than elsewhere in the state.
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Flight Dates:
 High Mountains (HM) ‚Č• 4,000 ft.
 Low Mountains (LM) < 4,000 ft.
 Piedmont (Pd)
 Coastal Plain (CP)

Click on graph to enlarge
Flight Comments: Adults have been observed year-round in Florida and between April and September at more northern latitudes. As of 2020, our records extend from mid-May through mid-October, with one exception in January along the coast.
Habitats and Life History
Habitats: The larvae have never been discovered and the preferred habitats are undocumented. Many of our records are from semi-wooded residential neighborhoods.
Larval Host Plants: Like most North American tineids, the larvae and their food resources have never been reported. The larvae presumably feed on either dead organic matter such as bird feathers, scat, and plant or animal remains, or on living fungi and lichens. - View
Observation Methods: The adults are attracted to lights.
Wikipedia
Status in North Carolina
Natural Heritage Program Status:
Natural Heritage Program Ranks: GNR SU
State Protection: Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.
Comments: This species seem to be reasonably secure in the state, but additional information on its distribution, abundance and habitat requirements before we can fully assess its conservation status.

 Photo Gallery for Homostinea curviliniella - No common name

37 photos are available. Only the most recent 30 are shown.

Recorded by: Hunter Phillips on 2024-06-14
Onslow Co.
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Recorded by: Rob Van Epps on 2023-09-06
Mecklenburg Co.
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Recorded by: Stephen Dunn on 2023-09-05
Orange Co.
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Recorded by: David George, Jeff Niznik on 2023-09-04
Orange Co.
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Recorded by: David George on 2023-08-15
Orange Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2023-06-01
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: David George on 2023-04-05
Durham Co.
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Recorded by: David George on 2023-04-05
Durham Co.
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Recorded by: David George on 2023-04-05
Durham Co.
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Recorded by: David George, L. M. Carlson on 2022-07-30
Orange Co.
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Recorded by: David George, L. M. Carlson on 2022-07-30
Orange Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2022-07-11
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2022-07-11
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2022-06-05
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2022-06-05
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Stephen Hall on 2022-05-03
Durham Co.
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Recorded by: R. Newman on 2021-10-13
Carteret Co.
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Recorded by: Ken Kneidel on 2021-09-11
Mecklenburg Co.
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Recorded by: Ken Kneidel on 2021-09-11
Mecklenburg Co.
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Recorded by: Ken Kneidel on 2021-09-11
Mecklenburg Co.
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Recorded by: Simpson Eason on 2021-08-20
Durham Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2021-05-24
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2021-05-24
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Mark Shields on 2020-10-15
Onslow Co.
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Recorded by: Simpson Eason on 2020-05-16
Durham Co.
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Recorded by: Mark Shields on 2020-05-16
Onslow Co.
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Recorded by: Mark Shields on 2020-01-10
Onslow Co.
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Recorded by: Mark Shields on 2019-10-05
Onslow Co.
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Recorded by: Mark Shields on 2019-08-24
Onslow Co.
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Recorded by: B. Bockhahn on 2018-07-25
Orange Co.
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