Moths of North Carolina
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74 NC Records

Chimoptesis gerulae (Heinrich, 1923) - No Common Name


Taxonomy
Superfamily: Tortricoidea Family: TortricidaeSubfamily: OlethreutinaeTribe: EucosminiP3 Number: 621180.00 MONA Number: 3272.00
Comments: Chimoptesis is a largely neotropical genus with 25 described species, four of which occur in the US (Razowski and Becker, 2015).
Identification
Field Guide Descriptions: Online Photographs: MPG, BugGuide, iNaturalist, Google, BAMONA, GBIF, BOLDTechnical Description, Adults: Heinrich (1923, as Griselda gerulae)                                                                                 
Adult Markings: The following description is based primarily on that of Heinrich (1923). The palps, antennae, and the crest on the crown of the head are grayish fuscous (Heinrich, 1923). The ground color of the forewing varies from grayish brown to dull ocherous-fuscous, with a whitish median patch on the dorsal margin (sometimes obscure) that extends inward to about one-third of the wing width. The white patch is preceded by a broad area of black that commonly extends from the wing base to the patch and covers the dorsal two-thirds or more of the wing. Immediately behind the patch is a narrower band of black that extends along the dorsal margin. A narrow arc of black extends from the median area of the costa obliquely to near the middle of the wing, then projects backwards to the apex. The costal portion is often fused or partially fused with the second black band behind the central white patch to produce a complete fascia. The costal edge within the arc has 3-4 short oblique dark streaks, and the apex usually has a dark costal spot. The ocellar region is rather poorly expressed and typically paler than the surrounding ground, and there are two or three faint black horizontal dashes in the ocellus. The hindwing is pale smoky fuscous.

Chimoptesis pennsylvaniana, which flies at the same time, is similar but has a much more conspicuous area of white or greenish-white running along the dorsal margin. Unlike C. pennsylvaniana, the palps and crests are not contrasting.
Wingspan: 17.5-18 mm (Heinrich, 1923)
Adult Structural Features: Males have a costal fold that is missing in Pseudexentera and other related genera (Heinrich, 1923). Gilligan et al. (2008) and Heinrich (1923) has an illustration of the male genitalia, and Powell (1964) has a general description of the genitalia for members of this genus as follows.

In males, the uncus is lacking and the posterior margin of the tegumen is either entire or with sclerotized projections at the posterior bases of the socii. The tegumen is broadly rounded, with the inner face bearing two elongated projections that are directed anteriorly. The socii are large, well developed, and broad from the base. The gnathos is reduced and very weakly sclerotized and the valve is simple. The cucullus is well defined, is densely hairy anteriorly, and has dense, short, strong spines posteriorly. The neck is rather strongly constricted and lacks well-developed spines or hair clusters. The clasper is lacking and the aedeagus is simple, straight, and stout.

In females, the papillae anales are simple, rotated 90° outward, and densely clothed with elongate setae exteriorly. The sclerotized portion of segments IX and X are either produced into a lobe dorsad or are simple. The posterior apophyses is short and stout, and segment VIII is narrowly sclerotized on the dorsal half with a pair of small projections of the sclerotized band cephalad. The sterigma is fused with sternite VII, sclerotized, and extends laterally into arms that are angling cephalad. The ductus bursae is narrow, simple, and either looped or with a twist just before the corpus bursae. The signa is narrow, rounded and thorn-like, and the surface of the corpus bursae is densely covered with unpigmented spiculae.
Adult ID Requirements: Identifiable from good quality photos of unworn specimens.
Immatures and Development: The larval life history is undocumented.
Distribution in North Carolina
Distribution: The range is largely restricted to the southeastern US and peripheral states. Specimens have been found from eastern Pennsylvania and New Jersey southward to Florida and westward to eastern Texas, Oklahoma, Tennessee, and southern Indiana. As of 2022, we have records from all three physiographic provinces, with the great majority from the Piedmont and Coastal Plain.
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Flight Dates:
 High Mountains (HM) ‚Č• 4,000 ft.
 Low Mountains (LM) < 4,000 ft.
 Piedmont (Pd)
 Coastal Plain (CP)

Click on graph to enlarge
Flight Comments: Local populations appear to be univoltine with the adults active during the winter and early spring months. The adults have been found from December through May in different areas of the range, with a seasonal peak in February and March. As of 2022, our records extend from early January through late-March.
Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Most of our records are from semi-wooded residential neighborhoods and other partially shaded habitats.
Larval Host Plants: The host plants are undocumented, but oaks may be the hosts given that two other Chimoptesis species use these. - View
Observation Methods: The adults are attracted to lights.
Wikipedia
Status in North Carolina
Natural Heritage Program Status:
Natural Heritage Program Ranks: GNR S4-S5
State Protection: Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.
Comments: This species appears to be secure within the state.

 Photo Gallery for Chimoptesis gerulae - No common name

114 photos are available. Only the most recent 30 are shown.

Recorded by: David George on 2024-03-13
Durham Co.
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Recorded by: David George on 2024-03-13
Durham Co.
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Recorded by: Dean Furbish and Joy Wiggins on 2024-03-03
Wake Co.
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Recorded by: Dean Furbish and Joy Wiggins on 2024-03-03
Wake Co.
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Recorded by: Jeff Niznik on 2024-02-11
Orange Co.
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Recorded by: Dean Furbish on 2024-02-10
Wake Co.
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Recorded by: Dean Furbish on 2024-02-10
Wake Co.
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Recorded by: Dean Furbish on 2024-02-09
Wake Co.
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Recorded by: Dean Furbish on 2024-02-09
Wake Co.
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Recorded by: Dean Furbish on 2024-01-26
Wake Co.
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Recorded by: Stephen Dunn on 2023-03-16
Orange Co.
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Recorded by: Stephen Dunn on 2023-03-16
Orange Co.
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Recorded by: Dean Furbish and Joy Wiggins on 2023-02-22
Wake Co.
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Recorded by: R. Newman on 2023-02-21
Carteret Co.
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Recorded by: Ken Kneidel on 2023-02-14
Mecklenburg Co.
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Recorded by: Ken Kneidel on 2023-02-14
Mecklenburg Co.
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Recorded by: Ken Kneidel on 2023-02-14
Mecklenburg Co.
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Recorded by: Dean Furbish on 2023-02-10
Wake Co.
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Recorded by: David George, Stephen Dunn on 2023-02-08
Orange Co.
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Recorded by: Dean Furbish on 2023-02-08
Wake Co.
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Recorded by: Dean Furbish on 2023-01-29
Wake Co.
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Recorded by: John Petranka on 2023-01-19
Orange Co.
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Recorded by: John Petranka on 2023-01-19
Orange Co.
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Recorded by: John Petranka on 2023-01-18
Orange Co.
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Recorded by: John Petranka on 2023-01-18
Orange Co.
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Recorded by: Dean Furbish and Joy Wiggins on 2022-03-03
Wake Co.
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Recorded by: Ken Kneidel on 2022-03-02
Mecklenburg Co.
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Recorded by: R. Newman on 2022-02-25
Carteret Co.
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Recorded by: Dean Furbish and Joy Wiggins on 2022-02-22
Wake Co.
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Recorded by: Dean Furbish on 2022-02-21
Wake Co.
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