Moths of North Carolina
Scientific Name:
Common Name:
Family (Alpha):
« »
View PDFTineidae Members:
Acrolophus Members:
64 NC Records

Acrolophus mycetophagus Davis, 1990 - Frilly Grass Tubeworm Moth


Taxonomy
Superfamily: Tineoidea Family: TineidaeSubfamily: [Acrolophinae]Tribe: [Acrolophini]P3 Number: 300100.00 MONA Number: 367.10
Comments: The genus Acrolophus is a mostly neotropical taxon with over 250 described species, including 54 that are currently recognized in North America. The labial palps on the males of many species are very elongated and densely hairy. The larvae of some species live in silk-lined burrows in the ground and feed on the roots and young shoots of grasses and herbs. However, the life histories of most species remain undocumented and in need of study. Members of this genus were previously placed in their own family (Acrolophidae), but they are now treated as a subgroup within the Tineidae based on molecular phylogenetic studies.
Identification
Field Guide Descriptions: Leckie and Beadle (2018)Online Photographs: MPG, BugGuide, iNaturalist, Google, BAMONA, GBIFTechnical Description, Adults: Davis (1990)                                                                                 
Adult Markings: This is a moderately small moth that has dull white forewings that are heavily marked with dark fuscous over the distal half. The legs have plumes of long, white hairs that are distinctive. The following description is based on that of Davis (1990). The labial palps are whitish, with the dorsal segment mostly fuscous. They are shorter than is seen in most Acrolophus, and extend dorsally to only slightly above the antennal bases. The head vestiture is relatively smooth, with piliform scales that are dull white. The antenna is approximately one-half the length of the forewing and light brown. The dorsum of the thorax is either uniformly white or with light brown to fuscous suffusion near the center. The ground color of the forewing is dull white. The basal third and sometimes the distal fourth are dull white, but occasionally with a fuscous suffusion. A dark fuscous suffusion extends obliquely across the wing from the subapical region to the middle of the inner margin. It tends to be more extensive on the female, and may obliterate or greatly reduce the proportion of white scales on the distal fourth of the wing. The hindwing is uniformly fuscous, with a paler, light brown fringe. The legs are light brown dorsally and white ventrally, with conspicuous plumes of long white hairs from the upper sections. The abdomen is brown to fuscous dorsally and cream colored ventrally.
Forewing Length: Male, 5-8 mm; female, 8-11 mm (Davis, 1990)
Adult Structural Features: Davis (1990) has detailed descriptions and illustrations of the male and female genitalia.
Adult ID Requirements: Identifiable from good quality photos of unworn specimens.
Immatures and Development: The larval life history is poorly documented. An adult was reared from a bracket fungus.
Distribution in North Carolina
Distribution: Acrolophus mycetophagus is mostly restricted to the Piedmont and Coastal Plain of the southeastern US. The range is from eastern Texas eastward to Florida, and northward to northern Mississippi, Tennessee, southern Kentucky, and Virginia. In North Carolina, this species is well-represented in the Coastal Plain and eastern Piedmont, but scarce farther west. As of 2022, we have only two records for the mountains.
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Flight Dates:
 High Mountains (HM) ≥ 4,000 ft.
 Low Mountains (LM) < 4,000 ft.
 Piedmont (Pd)
 Coastal Plain (CP)

Click on graph to enlarge
Flight Comments: Adults are active from February through October in the southernmost populations, and March through September elsewhere. Populations in North Carolina appear to be univoltine, with adults mostly flying from Mid-May through early July.
Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Local populations appear to be dependent on bracket fungi as food resources for larvae. We have records from semi-wooded residential neighborhoods as well as more natural, forested habitats.
Larval Host Plants: The adults do not feed on living foliage. There is one record of an adult being reared from a bracket fungus in Florida (Davis, 1990). Details of the species of fungus or host trees were not reported.
Observation Methods: The adults are attracted to lights.
Wikipedia
Status in North Carolina
Natural Heritage Program Status:
Natural Heritage Program Ranks: GNR [S4S5]
State Protection: Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.
Comments: This species is seemingly secure within the state.

 Photo Gallery for Acrolophus mycetophagus - Frilly Grass Tubeworm Moth

68 photos are available. Only the most recent 30 are shown.

Recorded by: Morgan Freese on 2022-07-24
Buncombe Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2022-07-06
Guilford Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: David George on 2022-07-02
Chatham Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: Steve Hall on 2022-06-30
Durham Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: David George, L. M. Carlson on 2022-06-26
Orange Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: Ken Kneidel on 2022-06-21
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: Ken Kneidel on 2022-06-21
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2022-06-14
Guilford Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: Dean Furbish on 2022-06-14
Wake Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: David George, L. M. Carlson on 2022-06-13
Durham Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: David George, L. M. Carlson on 2022-06-12
Orange Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: John Petranka on 2022-06-07
Orange Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2022-06-05
Guilford Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: Stephen Hall on 2022-05-27
Orange Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2022-05-26
Guilford Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2022-05-26
Guilford Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: Simpson Eason on 2022-05-19
Durham Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: Dean Furbish and Joy Wiggins on 2022-05-04
Pender Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: R. Newman on 2022-05-01
Carteret Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: Steve Taylor on 2021-07-10
Beaufort Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: Steve Taylor on 2021-07-10
Beaufort Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: Steve Taylor on 2021-07-10
Beaufort Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: David George on 2021-06-27
Durham Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: David George on 2021-06-20
Durham Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: Dean Furbish on 2021-06-17
Wake Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: Dean Furbish on 2021-06-17
Wake Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: David L. Heavner on 2021-06-15
Chatham Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: Simpson Eason on 2021-06-15
Durham Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: Dean Furbish on 2021-06-08
Wake Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: Mark Shields on 2021-06-05
Onslow Co.
Comment: