Moths of North Carolina
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View PDFGeometridae Members: 634 NC Records

Anavitrinella pampinaria (Guenée, [1858]) - Common Gray Moth


Taxonomy
Superfamily: Geometroidea Family: GeometridaeSubfamily: EnnominaeTribe: BoarmiiniP3 Number: 911009.00 MONA Number: 6590.00
Comments: A genus of four North American species, only one reaches North Carolina; the remainder are from the western US.
Species Status: Barcodes indicate a single species in our area with very little variation in haplotypes.
Identification
Field Guide Descriptions: Covell (1984); Beadle and Leckie (2012)Online Photographs: MPG, BugGuide, iNaturalist, Google, BAMONATechnical Description, Adults: Forbes (1948)Technical Description, Immature Stages: Forbes (1948); Wagner et al. (2001)                                                                                 
Adult Markings: Moderately long-winged, powdery gray with black lines, patterned similarly to other geometrids loosely termed the Grays. The base of the abdomen has a black bar followed by a white ring, which distinguishes Anavitrinella from most of the Grays except Iridopsis humaria and I. pergracilis, both of which have a bulge in the postmedian at vein C2; in Anavitrinella the postmedian is wavy but lacks a noticeable bulge at C2 (Forbes, 1948). The two Cleora species have similar rings at the base of the abdomen, but have the white ring at the base followed by a black patch. On the underside of the wings, the continuous, dark marginal bands also separate pampinaria from most of the other grays except members of the genus Hypomecis, which are larger and unlikely to be confused with this species because of their much longer pectinations on the antennae and the lack of the basal rings on the abdomen.
Adult Structural Features: Both sexes possess foveae on the base of the forewings, which in the males are especially well-developed; foveae are lacking in Iridopsis species but found in several others of the Grays. The male valves are rather featureless, a distinction in itself. The female bursa lacks a typical signum and the sclerotization of the appendix bursa is quite different from that of species likely to be confused with Anavitrinella.
Structural photos
Adult ID Requirements: Identifiable from good quality photos of unworn specimens.
Immatures and Development: Highly variable coloration and lack of distinctive features make the larvae difficult to distinguish Wagner et al., 2001); look for a squared head and a pair of dorsal warts on segment A-8 (see Wagner et a., 2001, for details).
Larvae ID Requirements: Identifiable from close inspection of specimens or by DNA analysis.
Distribution in North Carolina
Distribution:
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Flight Dates:
 High Mountains (HM) ≥ 4,000 ft.
 Low Mountains (LM) < 4,000 ft.
 Piedmont (Pd)
 Coastal Plain (CP)

Click on graph to enlarge
Flight Comments: Appears early in the spring and continues well into the fall. Breeding is continuous throughout the growing cycle.
Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Found in virtually all habitats that have been sampled for moths in the state.
Larval Host Plants: Broadly polyphagous, known to eat a wide variety of forbs, hardwoods, conifers, and grasses!
Observation Methods: The species is attracted to lights but not baits. Larvae will turn up in beatings but it is difficult to specifically search for them.
Wikipedia
See also Habitat Account for General Forests and Fields
Status in North Carolina
Natural Heritage Program Status:
Natural Heritage Program Ranks: G5 [S5]
State Protection: Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.
Comments: With its statewide distribution, broad range of host plants, and extremely generalized habitat associations, this species appears to be very secure.

 Photo Gallery for Anavitrinella pampinaria - Common Gray Moth

96 photos are available. Only the most recent 30 are shown.

Recorded by: David George on 2021-09-28
Durham Co.
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Recorded by: David George on 2021-09-27
Durham Co.
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Recorded by: David George, L. M. Carlson on 2021-09-18
Orange Co.
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Recorded by: David George, L. M. Carlson on 2021-08-27
Orange Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2021-08-19
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: Dean Furbish on 2021-08-13
Wake Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Bo Sullivan on 2021-08-09
Moore Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2021-08-06
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2021-08-06
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: tom ward on 2021-07-17
Buncombe Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2021-07-14
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: Simpson Eason on 2021-06-20
Durham Co.
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Recorded by: Dean Furbish on 2021-06-19
Wake Co.
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Recorded by: Steve Hall, Jim Petranka, and Bo Sullivan on 2021-06-07
Moore Co.
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Recorded by: Vin Stanton on 2021-06-02
Buncombe Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2021-05-21
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: Dean Furbish on 2021-05-13
Wake Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2021-05-01
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2021-04-28
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2021-04-26
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2021-04-20
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Dean Furbish on 2021-04-20
Wake Co.
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Recorded by: Dean Furbish on 2021-04-18
Wake Co.
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Recorded by: Dean Furbish on 2021-04-16
Wake Co.
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Recorded by: Simpson Eason on 2021-04-15
Durham Co.
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Recorded by: Dean Furbish on 2021-04-13
Wake Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2021-04-09
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: Steve Hall and Bo Sullivan on 2021-04-07
Moore Co.
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Recorded by: Dean Furbish on 2021-04-07
Wake Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2020-10-06
Guilford Co.
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