Moths of North Carolina
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36 NC Records

Dysstroma hersiliata (Guenée, [1858]) - Orange-barred Carpet Moth



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Taxonomy
Superfamily: Geometroidea Family: GeometridaeSubfamily: LarentiinaeTribe: HydriomeniniP3 Number: 910024.00 MONA Number: 7189.00
Comments: A large genus found worldwide (Europe, China, India, Japan, Argentina) usually at high altitudes. Three species reach North Carolina.
Species Status: Samples from North Carolina have been barcoded and appear to be conspecific with most samples from the eastern US. Out West, there may be additional sibling species.
Identification
Field Guide Descriptions: Covell (1984); Beadle and Leckie (2012)Online Photographs: MPG, BugGuide, iNaturalist, Google, BAMONA, GBIFTechnical Description, Adults: Forbes (1948)Technical Description, Immature Stages: Forbes (1948); Wagner et al. (2001)                                                                                 
Adult Markings: Although highly variable in forewing pattern, this is the easy member of the genus to identify. It is smaller than the other two species, has very short palpi, and the subapical band has a very sharp, long indentation toward the thorax; in comparison, there is only a very short indentation in D. truncata and none in D. citrata. Sexes are similar. Perches with wings open or closed.
Wingspan: 25 mm (Forbs, 1948)
Adult Structural Features: Our three species have quite similar genitalia but those of D. hersiliata are the most distinct. The patch of cornuti in the aedeagus is much reduced, in females the sclerotized area of the anterior bursa is much more extensive and the accessory bursa is difficult to differentiate.
Structural photos
Adult ID Requirements: Identifiable from good quality photos of unworn specimens.
Immatures and Development: Larvae are lime green, with a pair of cream subdorsal stripes and a distinctive spinulose integument (Forbes, 1948; Wagner et al., 2001). Overwinters in the egg stage.
Larvae ID Requirements: Identifiable from good quality photos, especially where associated with known host plants.
Distribution in North Carolina
Distribution: Restricted to higher altitudes and becoming quite common around 4,000 ft and extending to the tops of most mountains
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Flight Dates:
 High Mountains (HM) ≥ 4,000 ft.
 Low Mountains (LM) < 4,000 ft.
 Piedmont (Pd)
 Coastal Plain (CP)

Click on graph to enlarge
Flight Comments: There may simply be one extended brood but the flight period is quite long
Habitats and Life History
Habitats: All of our records come from high elevation (>3,000 ft) stands of mesic forest, including Rich Cove Forests, Northern Hardwoods, and Spruce-fir Forests, all habitats where our species of Ribes occur.
Larval Host Plants: Larvae appear to feed primarily or exclusively on Currants and Gooseberries (Ribes spp.) (Forbes, 1948; Wagner et al., 2001). Which of the three species in that genus that occur in North Carolina are favored, is unknown.
Observation Methods: Adults swarm at lights, response to bait unrecorded but likely negative.
Wikipedia
See also Habitat Account for Gooseberry Thickets
Status in North Carolina
Natural Heritage Program Status: SR
Natural Heritage Program Ranks: G4G5 S2S3
State Protection: Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.
Comments: Although locally abundant at some sites, this species is restricted to high elevations in the mountains, where it appears to be a strong specialist in terms of both host plants and associations with mesic forests. As such, it is likely to be vulnerable to the effects of global climate change.

 Photo Gallery for Dysstroma hersiliata - Orange-barred Carpet Moth

Photos: 3

Recorded by: Richard Teper on 2022-06-29
Avery Co.
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Recorded by: B. Bockhahn, P. Scharf on 2016-06-27
Yancey Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: K. Bischof on 2015-09-01
Yancey Co.
Comment: