Moths of North Carolina
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View PDFSphingidae Members: 109 NC Records

Eumorpha pandorus (Hübner, 1821) - Pandorus Sphinx


Taxonomy
Superfamily: Bombycoidea Family: SphingidaeSubfamily: MacroglossinaeTribe: MacroglossiniP3 Number: 890182.00 MONA Number: 7859.00
Comments: This is largely a Neotropical genus but 12 species are recorded from the U.S. and 5 from North Carolina.
Identification
Field Guide Descriptions: Covell (1984); Beadle and Leckie (2012)Online Photographs: MPG, BugGuide, BAMONATechnical Description, Adults: Forbes (1948); Hodges (1971); Tuttle (2007)Technical Description, Immature Stages: Forbes (1948); Wagner (2005); Tuttle (2007)                                                                                 
Adult Markings: A moderately large Sphinx moth with a distinctive pattern of pale and dark green patches on its wings and body. Markings are similar to that of E. intermedia, which is typically shaded with brown or reddish but can also be olive green (see Covell, 1984, and Brou, 2011, for details). Sexes are similar.
Adult ID Requirements: Identifiable from good quality photos of unworn specimens.
Immatures and Development: Late instar larvae are quite distinctive, varying in color but possessing large pale spots encircling the spiracles; humped or swollen anteriorly and possessing a slightly raised eyespot in place of the caudal horn (see Wagner, 2007, for details). Pupae are hidden several inches below the floor of the forest.
Larvae ID Requirements: Identifiable from good quality photos, especially where associated with known host plants.
Distribution in North Carolina
Distribution: Occurs statewide, including the Barrier Islands and High Mountains. Some records may represent migrants -- these robust moths are strong fliers and undoubtedly disperse over great distances.
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Flight Dates:
 High Mountains (HM) ≥ 4,000 ft.
 Low Mountains (LM) < 4,000 ft.
 Piedmont (Pd)
 Coastal Plain (CP)

Click on graph to enlarge
Immature Dates:
 High Mountains (HM) ≥ 4,000 ft.
 Low Mountains (LM) < 4,000 ft.
 Piedmont (Pd)
 Coastal Plain (CP)

Click on graph to enlarge
Flight Comments: Probably two broods.
Habitats and Life History
Habitats: The host plants used by pandorus occupy a wide range of habitats in North CArolina and we have larval records -- indicating resident populations -- from sites as different and far apart as Fort Macon on the Barrier Islands and New River State Park in the Mountains. We also have a large number of adult records from the Barrier Islands, Longleaf Pine and peatland habitats, all of which are fairly open. Most of our Mountain records come from mesic hardwood forests, including cove forests.
Larval Host Plants: Stenophagous. Larvae feed on members of the Grape family (Vitaceae), usually wild grapes and Virginia Creeper but will attack domestic grapes as well.
Observation Methods: Known to visit flowers but not found at bait. They are attracted to high intensity, including mercury-vapor, but come far less to 15 watt UV lights or incandescent porch lights; many of our records come from offices and other buildings with strong outdoor lighting. Larvae often found on Virginia Creeper.
Wikipedia
See also Habitat Account for General Vitaceous Tangles
Status in North Carolina
Natural Heritage Program Status:
Natural Heritage Program Ranks: G5 [S5]
State Protection: Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.
Comments: Its widespread occurrence across the state and use of a broad range of habitats makes this species relatively secure.

 Photo Gallery for Eumorpha pandorus - Pandorus Sphinx

76 photos are available. Only the most recent 30 are shown.

Recorded by: R. Newman on 2021-09-13
Carteret Co.
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Recorded by: Erich Hofmann on 2021-09-04
New Hanover Co.
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Recorded by: Erich Hofmann on 2021-09-04
New Hanover Co.
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Recorded by: Kenneth and James Rullo on 2021-08-27
Cumberland Co.
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Recorded by: Kenneth and James Rullo on 2021-08-27
Cumberland Co.
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Recorded by: David George, L. M. Carlson on 2021-08-27
Orange Co.
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Recorded by: David George, L. M. Carlson on 2021-08-27
Orange Co.
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Recorded by: Dean Furbish on 2021-08-05
Wake Co.
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Recorded by: John Petranka on 2021-08-04
Durham Co.
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Recorded by: Dean Furbish on 2021-08-01
Wake Co.
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Recorded by: tom ward on 2021-07-27
Buncombe Co.
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Recorded by: tom ward on 2021-07-27
Buncombe Co.
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Recorded by: Owen McConnell on 2021-07-24
Graham Co.
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Recorded by: tom ward on 2021-07-22
Buncombe Co.
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Recorded by: tom ward on 2021-07-22
Buncombe Co.
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Recorded by: L. Knepp on 2021-07-20
Surry Co.
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Recorded by: Stephen Hall and Savannah Hall on 2021-07-13
Orange Co.
Comment: Seen feeding on Virginia Creeper
Recorded by: Dean Furbish on 2021-06-15
Wake Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka, Bo Sullivan and Steve Hall on 2021-06-07
Moore Co.
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Recorded by: Simpson Eason on 2020-09-08
Wake Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2020-09-07
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2020-08-27
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Simpson Eason on 2020-08-26
Wake Co.
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Recorded by: Jeffrey Pippen on 2020-08-16
Durham Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2020-08-08
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn on 2020-07-15
Polk Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2020-06-23
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: S. Tillotson on 2019-09-24
Rutherford Co.
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Recorded by: S. Tillotson on 2019-09-24
Rutherford Co.
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Recorded by: K. Bischof on 2019-09-06
Yancey Co.
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