Moths of North Carolina
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View PDFGracillariidae Members: 38 NC Records

Cameraria guttifinitella (Clemens, 1859) - No Common Name



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Taxonomy
Superfamily: Gracillarioidea Family: GracillariidaeSubfamily: LithocolletinaeTribe: [Lithocolletini]P3 Number: 330360.00 MONA Number: 822.00
Comments: Cameraria is a genus of leaf-mining micromoths. Many species are stenophagous and specialize on a small number of closely related host species. There are currently more than 50 described species in North America.
Identification
Field Guide Descriptions: Online Photographs: MPG, BugGuide, iNaturalist, Google, BAMONA, GBIFTechnical Description, Adults: Clemens (1859)Technical Description, Immature Stages: Clemens (1859), Eiseman (2019)                                                                                 
Adult Markings: The adults closely resemble several other species of Cameraria, but can be identified from high-quality images that show both lateral and dorsal views. The adults appear to rarely visit lights and are best obtained by collecting leaves with mines and raising larvae to eclosion. The following is mostly based on Clemens (1859) original description of the adults. The front is silvery with a reddish hue, while the tuft and thorax are reddish orange. The antenna varies from light to blackish brown. The forewing is a rather deep reddish orange, with two silvery bands that are black margined behind. One is in the middle of the wing and nearly straight, while the other is midway between this and the base of the wing and somewhat obliquely placed. A costal silvery spot or streak is present before the costo-apical cilia and is black margined on both sides. A similar opposing silvery streak is present dorsally that is margined with black only on the posterior edge. The apical portion of the wing is dusted with blackish scales, and there is a white spot or short, faint streak near the tip above the middle of the wing. One or two dark marginal lines are sometimes evident: one near the margin of the dispersed scales and the second just posterior and in the cilia. This species lacks a pale or whitish streak at the base of the dorsal margin, which helps to distinguish it from other Cameraria with otherwise similar patterning.
Wingspan: 7-8 mm
Adult ID Requirements: Identifiable from good quality photos of unworn specimens.
Immatures and Development: The larvae feed on Toxicodendron species, including Poison Ivy (Toxicodendron radicans), Poison Oak (T. pubescens), and Poison Sumac (T. vernix). Feeding occurs on the upper leaf surface and eventually results in elongated blotch mines. These characteristically have light edges and darker centers that are frass-filled. Individual mines often have a single larva, but it is not uncommon for there to be two or more larvae present that feed communally. A single leaflet sometimes has two or more mines that occupy most of the surface of a leaflet and produce an overall bleached pattern. Larvae of the last seasonal brood typically overwinter in the mines in circular or oval-shaped, silk-lined chambers. They then pupate during the spring warm-up and eclose shortly thereafter (Eiseman, 2019).
Larvae ID Requirements: Identifiable from good quality photos, especially where associated with known host plants.
Distribution in North Carolina
Distribution: This species is broadly distributed in North America and occurs as far west as Washington State and British Columbia. In eastern North America, it occurs from southern Canada south to Texas and Florida (Eiseman, 2019). In North Carolina, most of our records are from the lower elevations in the mountains and the Piedmont where Poison Ivy is the primary host. As of 2022, we have only two records from the Coastal Plain.
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Flight Dates:
 High Mountains (HM) ≥ 4,000 ft.
 Low Mountains (LM) < 4,000 ft.
 Piedmont (Pd)
 Coastal Plain (CP)

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Immature Dates:
 High Mountains (HM) ≥ 4,000 ft.
 Low Mountains (LM) < 4,000 ft.
 Piedmont (Pd)
 Coastal Plain (CP)

Click on graph to enlarge
Flight Comments: Eiseman (2019) reported that this species is bivoltine. As of 2022, our earliest records of occupied mines are from early June.
Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Populations have been found in North Carolina in habitats that range from a mid-elevation hardwood forest in the Blue Ridge to a wetland habitat near the coast. Local populations occur in a variety of forested or edge habitats that support Poison Ivy and other host plants.
Larval Host Plants: The larvae require either Poison Ivy (Toxicodendron radicans), Poison Oak (T. pubescens), or Poison Sumac (T. vernix) for feeding and shelter. Almost all of our records as of 2022 are from Poison Ivy, with one from Poison Sumac. We have no records of this species using Poison Oak even though it is often locally abundant in some areas of the Coastal Plain.
Observation Methods: Local populations of this species are most easily detected by searching for the distinctive blotch mines that are on Poison Ivy and other species of Toxicodendron. Two other moth species mine Toxicodendron leaves in the eastern US. These produce either very elongated, narrow mines (Stigmella rhoifoliella), or linear mines that eventually widen and become tentiform (Caloptilia rhoifoliella). Both are easily distinguished from the large blotch mines of C. guttifinitella. The adults appear to rarely come to lights.
Wikipedia
See also Habitat Account for General Sumac Thickets and Poison Ivy Tangles
Status in North Carolina
Natural Heritage Program Status:
Natural Heritage Program Ranks: GNR S4S5
State Protection: Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.
Comments: Searches for leaf mines have added many new records for this species since 2015. Populations are often locally abundant where stands of Poison Ivy are present in mesic woods.

 Photo Gallery for Cameraria guttifinitella - No common name

51 photos are available. Only the most recent 30 are shown.

Recorded by: Tracy S. Feldman on 2022-06-03
Orange Co.
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Recorded by: Tracy S. Feldman on 2022-05-12
Durham Co.
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Recorded by: tom ward on 2022-05-03
Buncombe Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2022-03-28
Henderson Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2022-03-28
Henderson Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2022-03-28
Henderson Co.
Comment: Adult was reared from mine on Poison Ivy; mine on Sept 24, 2021 with nidus; adult emerged on April 4, 2022 after overwintering in refrigerator.
Recorded by: Ken Kneidel on 2021-10-05
Mecklenburg Co.
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Recorded by: Ken Kneidel on 2021-10-05
Mecklenburg Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2021-09-30
Scotland Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2021-09-24
Buncombe Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2021-09-24
Henderson Co.
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Recorded by: Steve Hall, Carol Tingley, Van Cotter, and Meriel Goodwin on 2021-09-21
Durham Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2021-09-18
Madison Co.
Comment: An occupied mine on Poison Ivy.
Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2021-09-12
Madison Co.
Comment: An occupied mine on Poison Ivy.
Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2021-09-10
Transylvania Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2021-09-10
Transylvania Co.
Comment: A backlit image showing two niduses.
Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2021-09-02
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2021-09-02
Madison Co.
Comment: A backlit image showing a feeding larva.
Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2021-08-03
Ashe Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2021-08-03
Watauga Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2021-07-23
Graham Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2021-07-22
Graham Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2021-07-13
Avery Co.
Comment: Occupied mines were on Poison Ivy.
Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2021-07-13
Mitchell Co.
Comment: Unoccupied mine was on Poison Ivy.
Recorded by: Vin Stanton on 2021-07-10
McDowell Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2021-07-06
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2021-06-27
McDowell Co.
Comment: Occupied upper surface mine was on Poison Ivy; one larva in the mine.
Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2021-06-21
Buncombe Co.
Comment: Occupied mines were on Poison Ivy
Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2021-06-16
Transylvania Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2021-06-07
Catawba Co.
Comment: Occupied upper surface mine was on Poison Ivy; two larvae in a single mine.